Searching for "turkle"

Sherry Turkle 2016 book

Sherry Turkle Says There’s a Wrong Way to Flip a Classroom

By Jeffrey R. Young     Oct 13, 2016

https://www.edsurge.com/news/2016-10-13-sherry-turkle-says-there-s-a-wrong-way-to-flip-a-classroom

“Reclaiming Conversation: The Power of Talk in a Digital Age,

It’s much more likely that students will get lit up by learning if they come in for office hours and they present a very imperfect argument and the teacher says, the mentor says, that’s not really right. That’s not really where it should be, but come back again. Come back here again. I’ll be here for you again.

So many faculty are kind of going in the opposite direction or saying we’re putting things online and you can take the course online.

definition flipped classroom
In a flipped classroom the idea is the students are learning the technical material at home and then the classroom time is designed to be about discussion of the material and questions about the material.
part of the narrative of a flipped classroom is that it’s somehow responding to a crisis of a deadened classroom instead of an enlivened classroom and that isn’t necessarily true.

an open laptop or an open iPad opens up a kind of cone of silence and attentional disarray around itself because students’ attention has sort of been taken by the open device.

We’re not using the technology really the way we should. And I think that education is a tough case because so much has been pitched and so much has been sold. Schools have been told that this is the future, and parents are told that this is the future. Actually, it’s not clear, it’s not clear how much of this is the future and how much some of this is just our feeling

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more on Sherry Turkle in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=turkle

intelligent chatbots

https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2018/11/14/magazine/tech-design-ai-chatbot.html

TWO YEARS AGO, Alison Darcy built a robot to help out the depressed. As a clinical research psychologist at Stanford University, she knew that one powerful way to help people suffering from depression or anxiety is cognitive behavioral therapy, or C.B.T. It’s a form of treatment in which a therapist teaches patients simple techniques that help them break negative patterns of thinking.

In a study with 70 young adults, Darcy found that after two weeks of interacting with the bot, the test subjects had lower incidences of depression and anxiety. They were impressed, and even touched, by the software’s attentiveness.

Many tell Darcy that it’s easier to talk to a bot than a human; they don’t feel judged.

Darcy argues this is a glimpse of our rapidly arriving future, where talking software is increasingly able to help us manage our emotions. There will be A.I.s that detect our feelings, possibly better than we can. “I think you’ll see robots for weight loss, and robots for being more effective communicators,” she says. It may feel odd at first

RECENT HISTORY HAS seen a rapid change in at least one human attitude toward machines: We’ve grown accustomed to talking to them. Millions now tell Alexa or Siri or Google Assistant to play music, take memos, put something on their calendar or tell a terrible joke.

One reason botmakers are embracing artificiality is that the Turing Test turns out to be incredibly difficult to pass. Human conversation is full of idioms, metaphors and implied knowledge: Recognizing that the expression “It’s raining cats and dogs” isn’t actually about cats and dogs, for example, surpasses the reach of chatbots.

Conversational bots thus could bring on a new wave of unemployment — or “readjustment,” to use the bloodless term of economics. Service workers, sales agents, telemarketers — it’s not hard to imagine how millions of jobs that require social interaction, whether on the phone or online, could eventually be eliminated by code.

One person who bought a Jibo was Erin Partridge, an art therapist in Alameda, Calif., who works with the elderly. When she took Jibo on visits, her patients loved it.

For some technology critics, including Sherry Turkle, who does research on the psychology of tech at M.I.T., this raises ethical concerns. “People are hard-wired with sort of Darwinian vulnerabilities, Darwinian buttons,” she told me. “And these Darwinian buttons are pushed by this technology.” That is, programmers are manipulating our emotions when they create objects that inquire after our needs.

The precursor to today’s bots, Joseph Weizenbaum’s ELIZA, was created at M.I.T. in 1966. ELIZA was a pretty crude set of prompts, but by simply asking people about their feelings, it drew them into deep conversations.

educational technology

The Overselling of Education Technology

By Alfie Kohn     Mar 16, 2016

https://www.edsurge.com/news/2016-03-16-the-overselling-of-education-technology

my response to ed tech is “It depends.”

Some people seem to be drawn to technology for its own sake—because it’s cool.

Other people, particularly politicians, defend technology on the grounds that it will keep our students “competitive in the global economy.”

But the rationale that I find most disturbing—despite, or perhaps because of, the fact that it’s rarely made explicit—is the idea that technology will increase our efficiency…at teaching the same way that children have been taught for a very long time. Perhaps it hasn’t escaped your notice that ed tech is passionately embraced by very traditional schools: Their institutional pulse quickens over whatever is cutting-edge: instruction that’s blended, flipped, digitally personalized.

We can’t answer the question “Is tech useful in schools?” until we’ve grappled with a deeper question: “What kinds of learning should be taking place in those schools?”

Tarting up a lecture with a SmartBoard, loading a textbook on an iPad, looking up facts online, rehearsing skills with an “adaptive learning system,” writing answers to the teacher’s (or workbook’s) questions and uploading them to Google Docs—these are examples of how technology may make the process a bit more efficient or less dreary but does nothing to challenge the outdated pedagogy. To the contrary: These are shiny things that distract us from rethinking our approach to learning and reassure us that we’re already being innovative.

putting grades online (thereby increasing their salience and their damaging effects), using computers to administer tests and score essays, and setting up “embedded” assessment that’s marketed as “competency-based.” (If your instinct is to ask “What sort of competency? Isn’t that just warmed-over behaviorism?”

But as I argued not long ago, we shouldn’t confuse personalized learning with personal learning. The first involves adjusting the difficulty level of prefabricated skills-based exercises based on students’ test scores, and it requires the purchase of software. The second involves working with each student to create projects of intellectual discovery that reflect his or her unique needs and interests, and it requires the presence of a caring teacher who knows each child well.a recent review found that studies of tech-based personalized instruction “show mixed results ranging from modest impacts to no impact” – despite the fact that it’s remarkably expensive.

 an article in Education Week, “a host of national and regional surveys suggest that teachers are far more likely to use tech to make their own jobs easier and to supplement traditional instructional strategies than to put students in control of their own learning.”

OECD reportednegative outcomes when students spent a lot of time using computers, while Stanford University’s Center for Research on Education Outcomes (CREDO) concluded that online charter schools were basically a disaster.

Larry Cuban, Sherry Turkle, Gary Stager, and Will Richardson.

Emily Talmage points out, uncannily aligned with the wish list of the Digital Learning Council, a group consisting largely of conservative advocacy groups and foundations, and corporations with a financial interest in promoting ed tech.

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more on educational technology in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=educational+technology

Qi Gong

Dr. Jerry Wellik will lead
When: every Monday
Where: in Atwood’s Maple Room
FREE Qi Gong sessions. Here is more info: https://www.springforestqigong.com/

Who: Faculty, staff, students and all community members are welcome.

Please consider also introducing in your classes to contemplative computing. Here is more information:

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=contemplative+computing

You may have heard the names of
David Levy (http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2016/06/01/mindful-tech/ )

Dan Barberzat (http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2013/11/05/getting-unplugged/ )
and, naturally,
Sherry Turkle

Please let us know, if you need more information, regarding the well-being of you and your students in relation to technology.

mindful tech

Mindful Tech: Establishing a Healthier and More Effective Relationship with Our Digital Devices and Apps
Tuesdays, June 7 and 14, 2016, 1:00 – 2:30 pm Central Time
David Levy, Information School, University of Washington

Don’t miss out on the opportunity to attend these personally helpful sessions.

Register Now for this 2 part webinar

“There is a long history of people worrying and complaining about new technologies and also putting them up on a pedestal as the answer…

As a society, I think we’re beginning to recognize this imbalance, and we’re in a position to ask questions like “How do we live a more balanced life in the fast world? How do we achieve adequate forms of slow practice?”

David Levy – See more at: http://tricycle.org/trikedaily/mindful-tech/#sthash.9iABezUN.dpuf

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xiv. fast world and slow world practices. always-on lifestyle.

p. 3. our devices have vastly extended our attentional choices, but the human attentional capacity remains unchanged. how to make wise choices and figure out what constitutes a wise choice, so we can use our digital tools to their best advantage and to ours.
by paying attention how you use your cellphone, how you handle email, how you feel when you are on FB or Pinterest, or when you multitask, you will be able to see which aspects of your current online practices are working well and which aren’t. seeing these will clearly will allow you to make constructive changes.
premise: we function more effectively and more healthfully online when we are more attentive, relaxed, and emotionally balanced. Also stated as negative: we function less effectively and less healthfully online when we are distracted, physically uncomfortable, and emotionally upset. that happens often when we are online. Good news – we can do something about it.
P. 4 engage and strengthen two forms of attention : 1. the ability to stay focused on what you are doing at the moment. 2. self-observation / self-awareness

p. 24. each excercise follows the same six-part structure

step 1: perform primary practice (email, FB etc)
step 2: observe what are you doing and feelig, paying special atention to what is happening in your mind and body as you engage in your primary practicestep 3: log your observation, in written form
step 4: consolidate observations by summarizing
step 5: formulate personal guidelines based on consolidated observatins
step 6: share and discuss with others

p. 25-26. mindfulness: the ability to direct your attention where you want it to go – to have a choice. in a world, where we are surrounded by advertisements, sales pitches, the biggest, best, and brightest promised of happiness and fulfillment that money can buy, not to mention the clear constant information overload of emails, status updates, tweets, photo albums, Netflix queues, RSS feeds, playin whack-a-mole with phone notifications. I wish I could say that we,  could get away, but i don’t think that as a society we can, or even that we should (this is where Turkle cannot help).

p. 27 two modes of attention
p. 27 one is like a flash light in a dark room: you see a chair; move to the left, you see something else.
p. 28 the other mode is to go beyond focusing on a single object, but opening up to the surrounding environment. like the same flash beam, but instead intense narrowed one, this is a diffused allowing to cover more, but with less visual acuity.
p. 29 both modes can exclude each other

p. 30 attentional shift, attentional choice
how to deploy our task focus (focused attention) to our self-awareness (open attention)
the brain has two different attentional systems: one is top-down and is under conscious control. the bottom-up system, an earlier evolutionary development, is completely automated. scanning the enthronement for potential threats, alerting us to them whether we want or not, since it is hard wired.

p. 31-32 interruption have two varieties: external ones: sounds, smells, movements, physical contact. internal interruptions are: hunger, mental activity (remembering late appointment).
we cannot turn alerting mechanisms, but we can minimize distractions.
we cannot turn everything off and eliminate all interruptions. what we can do is to notice them as they arise and make a decision how to proceed and face them – whether to respond in the moment or ignore them.

32. multitasking
it is now clearly established that we can mainly focus on only one thing at the a time. thus we have the ability to prioritize and focus on only one task.

34. emotions and the stress response

p. 40 strengthening task focus

mindful breathing – optional
simplest and most widespread form of attention training uses the breath as the object of focus. when mind wanders, bring back focus on your in- and out-breath: focusing, opening (noticing) and choosing. focus on your breath, notice when you have strayed and choose to come back to the breath

p. 41 strengthening self-observation / awareness
p. 42 Exercise 1. Observing email

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more on mindfulness in this IMS blog

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=mindfulness

more on the contemplative practices, contemplative computing specifically in this IMS blog

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=contemplative

IMS Instruction Sessions Spring 2016

IMS Instruction Sessions Spring 2016

Where is MC 205? Per campus map, Miller Center 205 is on the second floor, direction computer lab, right-handside, pass the counter with printers on both sides. Please use this virtual reality direction map to find the room (use Google Chrome and activate QuickTime plugin).

please have a link to a PDF copy print out instruction sessions spring 2016

Dreamweaver: 4 Mondays –  10-10:45AM . Jan 18, 25, Feb 1, 8 ; location MC 205.  attendees cap is 5

Keywords: web development, web design, Adobe Dreamweaver

Description: Adobe Dreamweaver CC is the default web development tool on campus. In four consecutive weeks, learn the basics of Dreamweaver, web development, web design and maintaining web pages on the Web. Site map and site structure. HTML and HTML5 basics, basics of CSS, page properties, text editing, hyperlinks and images, tables, forms.

Remote participation through desktopsharing at http://scsuconnect.stcloudstate.edu/ims upon registration and specific request

 

Photoshop: 4 Tuesdays – –  10-10:45AM .  Jan 19, 26, Feb 2, 9 ; location MC 205.  attendees cap is 5

Keywords: image processing, image editing, visual literacy, Adobe Photoshop

Description: In four 45 min sessions, learn the basics of image editing.  A comprehensive understanding of Adobe Photoshop and its essential tools. Design and edit, adjusting images for the Internet and print outs. Learn image formats, compressions, layers. Retouching, repairing and correcting photos

Remote participation through desktopsharing at http://scsuconnect.stcloudstate.edu/ims upon registration and specific request

 

Social Media in Education 9:30-10:15 AM. Feb 3, 10, 17, 24. location MC 205.  attendees cap is 15

Keywords: social media, social media in education, social media and learning, social media and teaching, social media and communication, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, LinkedIn, YouTube, Diigo, Delicious, Evernote, SideVibe, Pinterest, Vine, Snapchat, Google+, Zotero, Mendeley, blogs, wikis, podcasts, visuals, text
Description: In four 45 min sessions, structure your approach to social media and assess how to use in teaching and learning. What is social media and how to use it. How to discriminate between personal and professional use of social media. Amidst 180 most popular social media tools, acquire a robust structure to cluster them and orient yourself quick and easy, which tools fit best your teaching materials and methods to enable learning and communication with your students. Visuals versus text and how to combine them for effective communication and teaching. Policies, engagement of students. Expanding and improving research and organization of your research through social media and networking toward your research through social media.

Remote participation through desktopsharing at http://scsuconnect.stcloudstate.edu/ims upon registration and specific request

 

Cheating: what, why and how to avoid: Jan 28, 10-10:45AM .  location MC 205.  attendees cap is 15

Keywords: cheating, academic dishonesty, academic integrity, plagiarism.

Description: in 45 minutes we can start a conversation about identification of cheating practices and determination of what plagiarism is, considering generational differences, the evolution of the Internet. Identifying of “cheating” can provide robust boundaries for understanding students’ behavior and identifying practices and methods to alleviate such behavior, including change of teaching methods and practices.

Remote participation through desktopsharing at http://scsuconnect.stcloudstate.edu/ims upon registration and specific request

 

10 basics steps to start social media. March 16, 11-11:45AM  location MC 205.  attendees cap is 15

Keywords: social media, social media in education, social media and learning, social media and teaching, social media and communication, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, LinkedIn, YouTube, Diigo, Delicious, Evernote, SideVibe, Pinterest, Vine, Snapchat, Google+, Zotero, Mendeley, blogs, wikis, podcasts, visuals, text

Description: introduction to social media and its use for personal and professional purposes. Ideas and scenarios of using different social media tools in education. Hands-on exercises for using social media in teaching.

Remote participation through desktopsharing at http://scsuconnect.stcloudstate.edu/ims upon registration and specific request

 

Games and Gamification in Education. Feb 24 2-2:45PM, March 25, 10-10:45AM, April 14, 2-2:45PM MC 205, attendees cap is 5

Keywords: play, games, serious games, game-based learning, gaming, gamification.

Description: Gaming and Gamification is one of the most pronounced trends in education as per the New Horizon Report. Besides the increase of participation and enthusiasm, it increases learning. Introduction to gaming and gamification by establishing definitions, learning to distinguish gaming and gamification and learning the basics of gaming and gamification in the teaching process. Hands-on exercises for introducing gaming practices in the teaching and learning process and gamifying the existing syllabi.

Remote participation through desktopsharing at http://scsuconnect.stcloudstate.edu/ims upon registration and specific request

 

Teaching Online. Jan. 29. 10-10:45AM. Feb 18, 2-2:45PM,  March 30, 3-3:45 PM MC 205. attendees cap is 5.

Keywords: online teaching, mobile teaching, distance education, distributive learning, hybrid learning, hybrid teaching, blended learning

Description: this 45 min session is aimed to help you transition your F2F teaching to hybrid and online teaching. Learn about synchronous and asynchronous modes of teaching and communication to structure and organize your class materials and methods for better delivery. Hands-on exercises for improving content delivery, class discussions and communications among instructor and students.
Remote participation through desktopsharing at http://scsuconnect.stcloudstate.edu/ims upon registration and specific request

 

Effective Presentations. Jan 28, 2-2:45PM.  MC 205. attendees cap is 10

Keywords: presentations, PowerPoint, alternatives to PowerPoint, presentation design, presentation essentials, Prezi, SlideShare, LodeStar, Zentation, Zoho, Powtoon, Zaption, Thinglink, Haiku, Kahoot, Storify, EdPuzzle, PollDaddy, Evernote, Mammoth, SideVibe, Paddlet, Remind, Death by PowerPoint, visual literacy, media literacy, digital literacy, visuals
Description: http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2016/01/07/effective-presentations/ . These four 45 minute sessions are aimed to introduce and orient faculty, staff and students to the opulence of alternatives to PowerPoint and revisit the basics of well-tailored presentation. Hands-on exercises for improving the structure and delivery of presentation as well as the choice of presentation tools.
Remote participation through desktopsharing at http://scsuconnect.stcloudstate.edu/ims upon registration and specific request

 

Death by PowerPoint. Feb 26, 10-10:45PM. MC 205. attendees cap is 10

Keywords: presentations, PowerPoint, alternatives to PowerPoint, presentation design, presentation essentials, Death by PowerPoint, visual literacy, media literacy, digital literacy, visuals.
Description: http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2016/01/07/effective-presentations/ . This 45 minute session is aimed to introduce and orient faculty, staff and students to the basics of PowerPoint and revisit the basics of a well-tailored presentation. Hands-on exercises for improving the structure and delivery of presentation as well as the choice of presentation tools.

Remote participation through desktopsharing at http://scsuconnect.stcloudstate.edu/ims upon registration and specific request

 

Contemplative Computing or Disconnect: How to Bring Balance in Your Life by Managing well Your Technology. Feb 17. 2-2:45PM.  MC 205. attendees cap is 10

Keywords: disconnect, Sherry Turkle, contemplative computing, mediation, contemplative practices, balance, technology stress

Description: this 45 min session introduces faculty, staff and students to the idea of regulating the use of technology in a meaningful way. Hands-on exercises and sharing good practices on balancing the use of technology in daily life.

Remote participation through desktopsharing at http://scsuconnect.stcloudstate.edu/ims upon registration and specific request

 

Videos in the classroom: fast and easy. Jan 28, 10-10:45PM. MC 205. attendees cap is 5.
Keywords: video, video editing, video manipulation, visual literacy, digital literacy, MovieMaker, iMovie, Instagram, Vine, YouTube, Kaltura

Description: this 45 min session is an orientation to the resources available for delivery of visual materials in the classroom. Hands-on experience of different basics tools on different computer platforms.

Remote participation through desktopsharing at http://scsuconnect.stcloudstate.edu/ims upon registration and specific request

 

Voice Over presentations: solutions. Feb 4, 10-10:45PM. MC 205. attendees cap is 5.

Keywords: PowerPoint, VoiceThread, LodeStar, MediaSpace (Kaltura), audio editing, narration

Description: http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2015/04/28/voice-over-presentation-solutions/ . This 45 min session is a short hands-on introduction to the tools available at MnSCU intuitions and free third-party applications for delivery of narrative attached to presentations.

Remote participation through desktopsharing at http://scsuconnect.stcloudstate.edu/ims upon registration and specific request

 

Infographics: make your projects, presentations and research credible through presentable data. Feb 10, 2-2:45PM.  March 29, 10-10:45AM, MC 205. attendees cap is 10

Keywords: Piktochart, Infogr, Visualy, statistics, visual literacy, digital literacy
Description: http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2014/04/09/infographics-how-to-create-them/. This 45 min session is an orientation to the world of infographics. Short introduction to the basics of statistics and their importance in presenting a research and idea. Hands-on exercise using one of the 3 popular infographic tools.

technology for early childhood students

Plan for today, Mon, Nov 17 class session:

Parent involvement in their children’s social emotional and academic development.

  1. Introduce myself, who I am, who do I work with. Why is it good to know IMS and consider working with IMS. How to contact us – 5 min
  2. Start with a video from the following IMS blog entry: http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2013/05/01/on-digital-literacy/ :
    http://youtu.be/d5kW4pI_VQw – 2 min. What is the video about, how do students think it relates to their class (parent involvement in their children’s social emotional and academic development) – about 5 min
  3. Group work assignment – what is digital literacy and why is it important to people of all ages:
    Students work in groups and outline a definition of digital literacy and a list of 5 reasons about the importance – 5 min
    Study and discuss the following infographic (5 min)
    http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2014/10/16/early-learners-tech-use/
    For and against children spending time with technology. Gaming, social media, and computer use in general as addiction. “Disconnect/Unplugged” (Sherry Turkle) versus contemplative computing and similar meditative and contemplative practices: http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2013/11/05/getting-unplugged/
  4. Discussion on how does digital literacy vary between age groups; how do people from different ages communicate. How do they work together and help each other when learning about digital literacy. Who is the best source for students to learn about digital literacy (hint – IMS ;)) – 10 min
    Suggested source for more information: The SlideShare presentation on the IMS blog entry: http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2013/05/01/on-digital-literacy/: http://www.slideshare.net/dajbelshaw/etmooc-t3-s1-digital-literacies-with-dr-doug-belshaw
  5. Discussion on digital identity, digital citizenship, privacy and security. – 10 min
    http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2013/10/03/digital-identity-and-digital-citizenship/
  6. Questions and suggestions regarding

Digital Identity and Digital Citizenship

5 Excellent Videos to Teach Your Students about Digital Citizenship ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning

bibliography:

Ramspott’s blog entry best written for my personal taste, but here is a long list of additional and similar opinions:

Bramman, R. (n.d.). Digital Identity Essentials: Understanding Online Etiquette and the Rules Social Media Engagement. Research Personal Branding. Retrieved October 3, 2013, from http://www.reachpersonalbranding.com/digital-identity-essentials-understanding-online-etiquette-and-the-rules-social-media-engagement/

Braunstein, D. (2013, March 20). Digital Identities: Who Are You When You’re Online? Huffington Post. Retrieved from http://www.huffingtonpost.com/danya-braunstein/digital-identities-who-ar_b_2904211.html
Dalton, J. C., & Crosby, P. C. (2013). Digital Identity: How Social Media Are Influencing Student Learning and Development in College. Journal of College and Character, 14(1), 1–4. doi:10.1515/jcc-2013-0001
Death and the Social Network: The Persistence of Digital Identity. (n.d.). Jed Brubaker. Retrieved October 3, 2013, from http://www.jedbrubaker.com/death-and-the-social-network-the-persistence-of-digital-identity/
Digital identity. (2013, October 3). In Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Retrieved from http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Digital_identity&oldid=575355398
Digital Identity – Social Media and You. (n.d.). Altan Khendup. Retrieved October 3, 2013, from http://altankhendup.com/altankhendupblog/2013/6/6/digital-identity-social-media-and-you
Digital Identity and Social Media CFC. (n.d.). Liquid Learning. Retrieved October 3, 2013, from http://warburton.typepad.com/liquidlearning/2009/09/digital-identity-and-social-media-cfc.html
Digital Identity, Social Media, Privacy, Balance, and Being Radical. (n.d.). Retrieved October 3, 2013, from http://eduniverse.org/digital-identity-social-media-privacy-balance-and-being-radical
fsubeccaramspott. (n.d.). 2013: The Year of Digital Identity Development in Higher Education. CASE Blog. Retrieved October 3, 2013, from http://blog.case.org/2013/01/15/2013-the-year-of-digital-identity-development-in-higher-education/
Higher Ed Live – Digital Identity Development. (n.d.). Higher Ed Live. Retrieved October 3, 2013, from http://higheredlive.com/higher-ed-live-digital-identity-development/
Manage Your Digital Identity | Inside Higher Ed. (n.d.). Retrieved October 3, 2013, from http://www.insidehighered.com/blogs/gradhacker/manage-your-digital-identity
News: Social Media Thought Leader Eric Stoller to Speak About Digital Identity and Higher Education at Kent State, Feb. 14. (n.d.). Kent State University. Retrieved October 3, 2013, from http://www.kent.edu/news/newsdetail.cfm?newsitem=CAB2045F-0159-B0DC-526E15EFB8C5A416
Stewart, B. (n.d.). Digital Identities: Six Key Selves of Networked Publics. The Theoryblog. Retrieved October 3, 2013, from http://www.reachpersonalbranding.com/digital-identity-essentials-understanding-online-etiquette-and-the-rules-social-media-engagement/
Stroller, E. (n.d.). Digital Identity and Social Media // Speaker Deck. Retrieved October 3, 2013, from https://speakerdeck.com/ericstoller/digital-identity-and-social-media
Warburton, S., & Hatzipanagos, S. (Eds.). (2012). Digital Identity and Social Media: IGI Global. Retrieved from http://www.igi-global.com/book/digital-identity-social-media/63892

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Teach Digital Citizenship with … Minecraft

http://askatechteacher.wordpress.com/2013/10/03/teach-digital-citizenship-with-minecraft/

In the summer, there was an article about physics professor using Minecraft, but that’s not new because an MIT physics professor was using rap in the down of podcasting to teach physics and then another one later on was using Second Life. All of them gone by now…

From: Ewing, M Keith
Sent: Monday, September 30, 2013 4:43 PM
Subject: Eric Stoller on Digital Identity

A couple of interesting links to comments by Eric Stoller on “digital identity” – which he defines as “made up of their online interactions and exchanges.”

Character Clearinghouse – Interview with Eric Stoller, 2013 Jon C. Dalton Institute on College Student Values, Keynote Speaker

https://characterclearinghouse.fsu.edu/index.php/jon-c-dalton-institute-on-college-student-values/keynote-speakers/925-stoller

Digital Identity Keynote at Curry College (full video is about 63 minutes; includes transcript of the Twitter stream about his talk)

http://ericstoller.com/blog/2013/06/21/digital-identity-keynote-at-curry-college/

Eric might make a good speaker to students (and faculty) …

my (Plamen) note: Keith’s email and his suggestions for readings, e.g.

http://www.degruyter.com/view/j/jcc.2013.14.issue-1/jcc-2013-0001/jcc-2013-0001.xml

connects with “contemplative computing” and Turkle’s disconnect, so I am entering as tags