Searching for "video 360"

video 360 faculty assessment

Jones, C., Watkins, F., Williams, J., Lambros, A., Callahan, K., Lawlor, J., … Atkinson, H. (2019). A 360-degree assessment of teaching effectiveness using a structured-videorecorded observed teaching exercise for faculty development. Medical Education Online24(1), 1596708. https://doi.org/10.1080/10872981.2019.1596708

https://mnpals-scs.primo.exlibrisgroup.com/permalink/01MNPALS_SCS/hb33bq/informaworld_s10_1080_10872981_2019_1596708

enable faculty to receive a detailed 360-degree assessment of their teaching

The faculty in Gerontology and Geriatric Medicine at Wake Forest School of Medicine (WFSM) saw an opportunity to incorporate a focused teaching practicum for faculty within a multiple-specialty faculty development program. 360-degree assessments involve a combination of feedback from subordinates, colleagues and superiors. 360-degree feedback has been considered an essential tool in transformational leadership because the evaluation process avoids bias through diversity of viewpoints represented, and it is rarely applied to teaching assessments. Specifically, we designed a teaching practicum using a Videorecorded Observed Teaching Exercise (VOTE) to provide self-, peer- and learner assessments of teaching

Our design of videorecorded microteaching sessions embedded into a faculty development program presents a feasible, well-received model to provide faculty development in teaching and a robust 360-degree assessment of teaching skills.

Two strengths of our program are that it is feasible and reproducible.

In addition, costs for these sessions were low. VOTE video capture costs ranged from $45 – $90 per session depending on the audiovisual capacity of the room used for recording. Costs for this activity included an audiovisual technician who performed the room setup and videorecording. However, a handheld videorecorder or mobile device could be used for these sessions as well.

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more on video 360 in this iMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=360

cool video 360

View this post on Instagram

🌍 around the world . . . . . #augmentedreality #hololens #magicleap #art🎨 #arkit #arcore #vr #startup #technology #hogwarts #mixedreality #holographic #hologram #дополненнаяреальность #virtualreality #future #mixedreality #computergraphics #3d #iphonex #mixarofficial #виртуальнаяреальность #computervision #ai #artificial_intelligence . By @lee_manor

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SCSU VR AR Video 360

Chapter 12: AR, VR, and Video 360: Toward New Realities in Education by Plamen Miltenoff

in Augmented and Virtual Reality in Libraries, EDITED BY JOLANDA-PIETA VAN ARNHEM; CHRISTINE ELLIOTT AND MARIE ROSE

https://rowman.com/ISBN/9781538102909/The-LITA-Guide-to-Augmented-Reality-in-Libraries#

Special thanks to Mark Gill, the SCSU Visual Lab Director for collaborating on the project and helping with shaping the chapter. Special thanks to Tom Hergert for in-depth proofreading.

Thanks to Cari Kenner, Kirstin Bratt and Vicky Williams for accommodating the testing of the VIdeo 360 library orientation.

video 360 compilers

https://vr.google.com/tourcreator/

Example: https://poly.google.com/u/1/view/7rfKK4–oKN

example small business promotion: https://poly.google.com/view/5vVMdnSRzVS

https://poly.google.com/u/1/view/2yTR4KVvd-0

http://www.freetech4teachers.com/2018/05/how-to-add-points-of-interest-to.html

http://www.marzipano.net/tool/index.html

Asynchronous Virtual Field Experiences with 360 Video

Zolfaghari, M., Austin, C. K., Kosko, K. W., & Ferdig, R. E. (2020). Creating Asynchronous Virtual Field Experiences with 360 Video. Journal of Technology and Teacher Education, 28(2), 315–320.
https://www.learntechlib.org/p/216115/
The global COVID-19 pandemic has disrupted normal face-to-face classes across institutions. This has significantly impacted methods courses where preservice teachers (PSTs) practice pedagogy in the field (e.g., in the PreK-12 classroom). In this paper, we describe efforts to adapt an assignment originally situated in a face-to-face school placement into a virtual version. By utilizing multi-perspective 360 video, preliminary results suggest virtual field experiences can provide PSTs with similar experiences for observation-based assignments. Acknowledging that immersive virtual experiences are not a complete replacement for face-to-face field-based experiences, we suggest virtual field assignments can be a useful supplement or a viable alternative during a time of pandemic.

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more on Video 360 in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=360
and specifically for education:
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=video+360+education

360 video issues

Issues with displaying 360 video on mobiles and regular computers

this is time sensitive information; it can change at any moment. Please enter in the comment section your most recent findings and I will update the list

Finding:
360 video does not display properly in Mozilla Firefox and Internet Explorer. The only known browser to display properly is Google Chrome.
Reason:
360 video needs HMTL5 Player and does not play on the Flash platform
Sources:
Web support isn’t quite so good for a couple of reasons. One is that only certain web browsers support such content. Chrome and Opera are compatible, for example, whilst Safari and Firefox are not.
Arguably the best way to experience YouTube’s 360-degree content, however, is through Google Cardboard.
Facebook is the other major portal through which 360-degree video content can be enjoyed, though it came to the game far later than Google.
Unlike Google’s YouTube implementation, however, there’s no Google Cardboard support on the VR side. Rather, Facebook recently opened out support to Samsung’s Gear VR ahead of the inevitable support from its own Oculus Rift when that launches early in 2016.
http://www.trustedreviews.com/opinions/how-can-i-watch-facebook-360-videos-1
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360° video only works when you use the HTML5 player. Currently it’s available on Android devices and Chrome browsers. Go here –> http://youtube.com/html5 to check if you’re using the HTML5 player.
https://productforums.google.com/forum/#!topic/youtube/7sk92Fs1juk
———————-
How do you get html5 to work with Firefox?
https://support.mozilla.org/en-US/questions/958124
Videos to test:
in browser: http://bit.ly/VRlib
in YouTube: http://bit.ly/SCSULIB
Panorama to test:
http://bit.ly/scsuvrlib

Finding:
360 video does not display properly on Apple and Android mobile devices neither through Google Chrome browser for mobile devices nor through YouTube
Reason:
360 video needs HMTL5 Player and does not play on the Flash platform
Sources:
Arguably the best way to experience YouTube’s 360-degree content, however, is through Google Cardboard.
Facebook is the other major portal through which 360-degree video content can be enjoyed, though it came to the game far later than Google.
Unlike Google’s YouTube implementation, however, there’s no Google Cardboard support on the VR side. Rather, Facebook recently opened out support to Samsung’s Gear VR ahead of the inevitable support from its own Oculus Rift when that launches early in 2016.
http://www.trustedreviews.com/opinions/how-can-i-watch-facebook-360-videos-1
Videos to test:
in browser: http://bit.ly/VRlib
in YouTube: http://bit.ly/SCSULIB

Conclusion/Resolutions:
– make sure desktop/laptop has installed Google Chrome browser. – if instructor’s station and you cannot and/or don’t have time to install, Chrome, bring your own laptop
– if possible, identify which of the students’ phones are displaying correctly (HTML5) 360 video and panorama and collaborate with students to use their phones and demonstrate to other students the Google Cardbox experience.

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more on 360 video in this IMS blog:
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=360

IM 690 Gear 360 tutorial

IM 690 Virtual Reality and Augmented Reality

https://stcloudstate.learn.minnstate.edu/d2l/home/4819732

Jan. 21, MC 205 (how to get to the PDR room:

Plan: learn to create, edit and use still 360 degrees images and videos.

#scalability

  1. What is 360 degrees video and how does it fit in the Virtual Reality concept?
    https://www.academia.edu/41628237/Chapter_12_VR_AR_and_Video_360_A_Case_Study_Towards_New_Realities_in_Education_by_Plamen_Miltenoff
  2. Video 360: existing materials versus materials we create
    1. how to find existing materials
      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nOHM8gnin8Y
      https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=360+videos+education
    2. how to decide if we need to create materials
      https://poly.google.com/u/1/view/epydAlXlJSw
      https://poly.google.com/u/1/view/elo1OtpgzHP
      https://poly.google.com/view/8HB4l4zGSbv
  3. Tools and apps for Video 360
    1. Cameras:
      1. Samsung Gear 360: https://www.samsung.com/global/galaxy/gear-360/
        1. 2016
        2. 2017
      2. alternatives: https://filmora.wondershare.com/virtual-reality/samsung-gear-360-camera-alternatives.html
      3. Vuze: https://vuze.camera/
        https://youtu.be/peu-OavRcd8 
        Video 360 3D
    2. Samsung Android (Galaxy) phones app
      https://youtu.be/AKhfoJjcZBM?t=66
    3. Editing
      1. Gear 360 Action Director
        https://youtu.be/c2bcz77y3UY
      2. Photoshop CC

https://www.digitaltrends.com/photography/how-to-edit-360-photos-in-photoshop/

https://tonyredhead.com/adobe/360-photoshop-advanced-editing

Phot

 

      1. Premiere CC
        https://youtu.be/8g4DhBEWvak
      2. Others
  1. Issues and solutions
    1. issues connected to Windows and Apple
      https://youtu.be/2Fok2YcyNSw
      (explains all the quirks between the 2016 & 2017 cameras)
    2. issues connected to Gear 360 camera
    3. issues connected to Gear 360 ActionDirector
      in version 2.0, drag and drop, export etc.
      https://youtu.be/c2bcz77y3UY
  2. Upload
    1. local
    2. social media
      1. Facebook
      2. YouTube
        1. resolution
        2. live stream
  3. Viewing, goggles
    1. Google Cardboard
      1. why do we still consider it?
    2. Low-end goggles (examples)
      1. Pansonite 3D VR Headset
      2. Gearsone G1 VR Headset
      3. Utopia 360 VR Headset
      4. TaoTronics 3D VR Headset
      5. Destek V4 VR Headset
    3. Hi-end goggles
      1. Oculus https://www.oculus.com/
        1. Go
        2. Rift
        3. Quest
          1. haptic devices https://youtu.be/6IhQnWb44zk
      2. HTC Vive: https://www.vive.com/us/comparison/
      3. Daydream Lenovo: https://www.lenovo.com/us/en/daydreamvr/
  4. Creating content
    1. Polly Google Tour Creator: https://poly.google.com/creator/tours/
      https://poly.google.com/view/8HB4l4zGSbv
      (turn ambient audio on)

Error messages working with Action Director

Gear 360 Action Director Error Msg

Gear 360 Action Director Error MsgNVIDIA error msg

 

 

More on VR in this IMS blog:
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2018/11/01/vendors-for-vr/

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1efFVsOIwxlTO2Qy-onKbG0dgr8qum3onq3bgFkaVfec/edit?usp=sharing

first snow in 360

Well, technically not the first for 2016, but certainly beautiful:

https://app.viar360.com/media?leaf=2LlIRQqu1Wto

Best experience with VR goggles: Google Cardbox, HTC Vive etc. (please ask for more info if needed). If you have goggles, choose “VR Mode” (1), if viewing on your computing device (desktop, laptop, smart phone, tablet) and/or don’t have goggles, choose “Panorama Mode” (2)

Virtual Reality

Save

If you would like to brainstorm ideas to apply Virtual Reality, Augmented Reality and/or 360 video in your courses, please let us know…

Emerging Trends and Impacts of the Internet of Things in Libraries

Emerging Trends and Impacts of the Internet of Things in Libraries

https://www.igi-global.com/gateway/book/244559

Chapters:

Holland, B. (2020). Emerging Technology and Today’s Libraries. In Holland, B. (Eds.), Emerging Trends and Impacts of the Internet of Things in Libraries (pp. 1-33). IGI Global. http://doi:10.4018/978-1-7998-4742-7.ch001

The purpose of this chapter is to examine emerging technology and today’s libraries. New technology stands out first and foremost given that they will end up revolutionizing every industry in an age where digital transformation plays a major role. Major trends will define technological disruption. The next-gen of communication, core computing, and integration technologies will adopt new architectures. Major technological, economic, and environmental changes have generated interest in smart cities. Sensing technologies have made IoT possible, but also provide the data required for AI algorithms and models, often in real-time, to make intelligent business and operational decisions. Smart cities consume different types of electronic internet of things (IoT) sensors to collect data and then use these data to manage assets and resources efficiently. This includes data collected from citizens, devices, and assets that are processed and analyzed to monitor and manage, schools, libraries, hospitals, and other community services.

Makori, E. O. (2020). Blockchain Applications and Trends That Promote Information Management. In Holland, B. (Eds.), Emerging Trends and Impacts of the Internet of Things in Libraries (pp. 34-51). IGI Global. http://doi:10.4018/978-1-7998-4742-7.ch002
Blockchain revolutionary paradigm is the new and emerging digital innovation that organizations have no choice but to embrace and implement in order to sustain and manage service delivery to the customers. From disruptive to sustaining perspective, blockchain practices have transformed the information management environment with innovative products and services. Blockchain-based applications and innovations provide information management professionals and practitioners with robust and secure opportunities to transform corporate affairs and social responsibilities of organizations through accountability, integrity, and transparency; information governance; data and information security; as well as digital internet of things.
Hahn, J. (2020). Student Engagement and Smart Spaces: Library Browsing and Internet of Things Technology. In Holland, B. (Eds.), Emerging Trends and Impacts of the Internet of Things in Libraries (pp. 52-70). IGI Global. http://doi:10.4018/978-1-7998-4742-7.ch003
The purpose of this chapter is to provide evidence-based findings on student engagement within smart library spaces. The focus of smart libraries includes spaces that are enhanced with the internet of things (IoT) infrastructure and library collection maps accessed through a library-designed mobile application. The analysis herein explored IoT-based browsing within an undergraduate library collection. The open stacks and mobile infrastructure provided several years (2016-2019) of user-generated smart building data on browsing and selecting items in open stacks. The methods of analysis used in this chapter include transactional analysis and data visualization of IoT infrastructure logs. By analyzing server logs from the computing infrastructure that powers the IoT services, it is possible to infer in greater detail than heretofore possible the specifics of the way library collections are a target of undergraduate student engagement.
Treskon, M. (2020). Providing an Environment for Authentic Learning Experiences. In Holland, B. (Eds.), Emerging Trends and Impacts of the Internet of Things in Libraries (pp. 71-86). IGI Global. http://doi:10.4018/978-1-7998-4742-7.ch004
The Loyola Notre Dame Library provides authentic learning environments for undergraduate students by serving as “client” for senior capstone projects. Through the creative application of IoT technologies such as Arduinos and Raspberry Pis in a library setting, the students gain valuable experience working through software design methodology and create software in response to a real-world challenge. Although these proof-of-concept projects could be implemented, the library is primarily interested in furthering the research, teaching, and learning missions of the two universities it supports. Whether the library gets a product that is worth implementing is not a requirement; it is a “bonus.”
Rashid, M., Nazeer, I., Gupta, S. K., & Khanam, Z. (2020). Internet of Things: Architecture, Challenges, and Future Directions. In Holland, B. (Ed.), Emerging Trends and Impacts of the Internet of Things in Libraries (pp. 87-104). IGI Global. http://doi:10.4018/978-1-7998-4742-7.ch005
The internet of things (IoT) is a computing paradigm that has changed our daily livelihood and functioning. IoT focuses on the interconnection of all the sensor-based devices like smart meters, coffee machines, cell phones, etc., enabling these devices to exchange data with each other during human interactions. With easy connectivity among humans and devices, speed of data generation is getting multi-fold, increasing exponentially in volume, and is getting more complex in nature. In this chapter, the authors will outline the architecture of IoT for handling various issues and challenges in real-world problems and will cover various areas where usage of IoT is done in real applications. The authors believe that this chapter will act as a guide for researchers in IoT to create a technical revolution for future generations.
Martin, L. (2020). Cloud Computing, Smart Technology, and Library Automation. In Holland, B. (Eds.), Emerging Trends and Impacts of the Internet of Things in Libraries (pp. 105-123). IGI Global. http://doi:10.4018/978-1-7998-4742-7.ch006
As technology continues to change, the landscape of the work of librarians and libraries continue to adapt and adopt innovations that support their services. Technology also continues to be an essential tool for dissemination, retrieving, storing, and accessing the resources and information. Cloud computing is an essential component employed to carry out these tasks. The concept of cloud computing has long been a tool utilized in libraries. Many libraries use OCLC to catalog and manage resources and share resources, WorldCat, and other library applications that are cloud-based services. Cloud computing services are used in the library automation process. Using cloud-based services can streamline library services, minimize cost, and the need to have designated space for servers, software, or other hardware to perform library operations. Cloud computing systems with the library consolidate, unify, and optimize library operations such as acquisitions, cataloging, circulation, discovery, and retrieval of information.
Owusu-Ansah, S. (2020). Developing a Digital Engagement Strategy for Ghanaian University Libraries: An Exploratory Study. In Holland, B. (Eds.), Emerging Trends and Impacts of the Internet of Things in Libraries (pp. 124-139). IGI Global. http://doi:10.4018/978-1-7998-4742-7.ch007
This study represents a framework that digital libraries can leverage to increase usage and visibility. The adopted qualitative research aims to examine a digital engagement strategy for the libraries in the University of Ghana (UG). Data is collected from participants (digital librarians) who are key stakeholders of digital library service provision in the University of Ghana Library System (UGLS). The chapter reveals that digital library services included rare collections, e-journal, e-databases, e-books, microfilms, e-theses, e-newspapers, and e-past questions. Additionally, the research revealed that the digital library service patronage could be enhanced through outreach programmes, open access, exhibitions, social media, and conferences. Digital librarians recommend that to optimize digital library services, literacy programmes/instructions, social media platforms, IT equipment, software, and website must be deployed. In conclusion, a DES helps UGLS foster new relationships, connect with new audiences, and establish new or improved brand identity.
Nambobi, M., Ssemwogerere, R., & Ramadhan, B. K. (2020). Implementation of Autonomous Library Assistants Using RFID Technology. In Holland, B. (Ed.), Emerging Trends and Impacts of the Internet of Things in Libraries (pp. 140-150). IGI Global. http://doi:10.4018/978-1-7998-4742-7.ch008
This is an interesting time to innovate around disruptive technologies like the internet of things (IoT), machine learning, blockchain. Autonomous assistants (IoT) are the electro-mechanical system that performs any prescribed task automatically with no human intervention through self-learning and adaptation to changing environments. This means that by acknowledging autonomy, the system has to perceive environments, actuate a movement, and perform tasks with a high degree of autonomy. This means the ability to make their own decisions in a given set of the environment. It is important to note that autonomous IoT using radio frequency identification (RFID) technology is used in educational sectors to boost the research the arena, improve customer service, ease book identification and traceability of items in the library. This chapter discusses the role, importance, the critical tools, applicability, and challenges of autonomous IoT in the library using RFID technology.
Priya, A., & Sahana, S. K. (2020). Processor Scheduling in High-Performance Computing (HPC) Environment. In Holland, B. (Ed.), Emerging Trends and Impacts of the Internet of Things in Libraries (pp. 151-179). IGI Global. http://doi:10.4018/978-1-7998-4742-7.ch009
Processor scheduling is one of the thrust areas in the field of computer science. The future technologies use a huge amount of processing for execution of their tasks like huge games, programming software, and in the field of quantum computing. In real-time, many complex problems are solved by GPU programming. The primary concern of scheduling is to reduce the time complexity and manpower. Several traditional techniques exit for processor scheduling. The performance of traditional techniques is reduced when it comes to the huge processing of tasks. Most scheduling problems are NP-hard in nature. Many of the complex problems are recently solved by GPU programming. GPU scheduling is another complex issue as it runs thousands of threads in parallel and needs to be scheduled efficiently. For such large-scale scheduling problems, the performance of state-of-the-art algorithms is very poor. It is observed that evolutionary and genetic-based algorithms exhibit better performance for large-scale combinatorial and internet of things (IoT) problems.
Kirsch, B. (2020). Virtual Reality in Libraries. In Holland, B. (Eds.), Emerging Trends and Impacts of the Internet of Things in Libraries (pp. 180-193). IGI Global. http://doi:10.4018/978-1-7998-4742-7.ch010
Librarians are beginning to offer virtual reality (VR) services in libraries. This chapter reviews how libraries are currently using virtual reality for both consumption and creation purposes. Virtual reality tools will be compared and contrasted, and recommendations will be given for purchasing and circulating headsets and VR equipment. Google Tour Creator and a smartphone or 360-degree camera can be used to create a virtual tour of the library and other virtual reality content. These new library services will be discussed along with practical advice and best practices for incorporating virtual reality into the library for instructional and entertainment purposes.
Heffernan, K. L., & Chartier, S. (2020). Augmented Reality Gamifies the Library: A Ride Through the Technological Frontier. In Holland, B. (Ed.), Emerging Trends and Impacts of the Internet of Things in Libraries (pp. 194-210). IGI Global. http://doi:10.4018/978-1-7998-4742-7.ch011
Two librarians at a University in New Hampshire attempted to integrate gamification and mobile technologies into the exploration of, and orientation to, the library’s services and resources. From augmented reality to virtual escape rooms and finally an in-house app created by undergraduate, campus-based, game design students, the library team learned much about the triumphs and challenges that come with attempting to utilize new technologies to reach users in the 21st century. This chapter is a narrative describing years of various attempts, innovation, and iteration, which have led to the library team being on the verge of introducing an app that could revolutionize campus discovery and engagement.
Miltenoff, P. (2020). Video 360 and Augmented Reality: Visualization to Help Educators Enter the Era of eXtended Reality. In Holland, B. (Eds.), Emerging Trends and Impacts of the Internet of Things in Libraries (pp. 211-225). IGI Global. http://doi:10.4018/978-1-7998-4742-7.ch012
The advent of all types of eXtended Reality (XR)—VR, AR, MR—raises serious questions, both technological and pedagogical. The setup of campus services around XR is only the prelude to the more complex and expensive project of creating learning content using XR. In 2018, the authors started a limited proof-of-concept augmented reality (AR) project for a library tour. Building on their previous research and experience creating a virtual reality (VR) library tour, they sought a scalable introduction of XR services and content for the campus community. The AR library tour aimed to start us toward a matrix for similar services for the entire campus. They also explored the attitudes of students, faculty, and staff toward this new technology and its incorporation in education, as well as its potential and limitations toward the creation of a “smart” library.

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