Searching for "video 360"

metabook

Metabook line

https://www.marketplace.org/shows/marketplace-tech/marketplace-tech-thursday-november-17-2016

Film isn’t the only medium that gets the virtual reality treatment. The best-selling author Wally Lamb has a new book called “I’ll Take You There” that’ll launch as part of the Metabook line — a series of works that include extras like 360 degree videos and photos.

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More on ebooks in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=ebook

Stanford VR Project

Stanford VR Project Shows Students Oceans of the Future

By Dian Schaffhauser 10/19/16

https://thejournal.com/articles/2016/10/19/stanford-vr-project-shows-students-oceans-of-the-future.aspx

A new, free virtual reality program allows users to explore just what happens as climate change kills off coral reefs. The Stanford Ocean Acidification Experience is a free science education tool that takes students to the bottom of the sea and then fast-forwards their experience to the end of this century, when, as scientists predict, many coral reefs are expected to corrode through ocean acidification. By putting the experience in VR, the collaborators say they are hoping to change people’s behavior in the real world.

The project came out of Stanford’s Virtual Human Interaction Lab, which created a related 360-degree video project that also examines the problem of global warming and its impact on the ocean’s life forms. But it’s the VR version that allows the viewer to deep-sea dive and collect samples off of the ocean floor.

The lab created the software in partnership with marine biologists Fiorenza Micheli from Stanford and Kristy Kroeker, formerly at Stanford and now at the University of California, Santa Cruz, as well as Roy Pea, a professor at Stanford’s Graduate School of Education. The development process took two years to recreate a virtual replica of an actual rocky reef around the Italian island of Ischia

A related video, “The Crystal Reef,” filmed in 360 degrees and developed as part of a master’s degree project by a lab member, premiered during the Tribeca Film Festival earlier this year. There, people could watch the film on VR headgear. “We had a line of dozens of people for 11 hours a day, six days straight,” said Bailenson, in a Stanford article about the project.

The VR project has also gone to Washington, where lawmakers and staffers tried it out during a Capitol Hill event organized by non-profit Ocean Conservancy.

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more on virtual reality in this IMS blog

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=virtual+reality

Ethical Considerations For Using Virtual Reality

Five Ethical Considerations For Using Virtual Reality with Children and Adolescents

Five Ethical Considerations For Using Virtual Reality with Children and Adolescents

G+ link https://plus.google.com/+TessPajaron/posts/8YYgjoPrQvq

In an address to the VRX conference in San Francisco, noted game developer and tech wizard, Jesse Schell predicted that over 8 million VR gamer headsets will be sold in 2016. Facebook purchased Oculus Rift, presumably laying the groundwork for a future where friends and family will interact in rich virtual spaces. All the major players, including Microsoft, Sony, Samsung, Google and an HTC and Valve partnership are jostling for the consumer headset market.

Experimenting with VR in his classes as part of a project piloted by Seattle-based foundry10, a privately funded research organization that creates partnerships with educators to implement, research and explore the various intersections of emerging technologies and learning, including VR..

And the technology’s potential for good is vast. It has already been used to help with autism, improve personal financial management, treat PTSD and manage pain. More and more news outlets, including the New York Times, are adopting immersive journalism, where news stories can be experienced through VR.

As an educational tool, VR might prove transformative. Google Expeditions allows students to take over 100 virtual journeys from ancient Rome to the surface of Mars. It might also have a big impact on social emotional learning (SEL), as VR’s unique ability to produce empathy recently led Wired magazine to explore its potential as “the ultimate empathy machine”. Addressing a persistent anxiety, Suter used Samsung Gear’s Public Speaking Simulator to successfully prepare a few nervous students for class presentations, reporting they felt “much more calm” during the live delivery.

Ethical Considerations

In a recently published article, researchers Michael Madary and Thomas K. Metzinger from Johannes Gutenberg University in Germany review a series of ethical considerations when implementing VR. The illusion of embodiment may provide VR’s greatest value to education, but also lies at the heart of its ethical implementation. Madary and Metzinger believe that VR is not just an evolution from television and video game screens, but a revolution that will have an enormous social impact. In their paper, they claim that:

VR technology will eventually change not only our general image of humanity but also our understanding of deeply entrenched notions, such as “conscious experience,” “selfhood,” “authenticity,” or “realness.”

It’s important to remember that many current VR uses in schools, like Google Expeditions, are not interactive VR, but simply 360-degree video experiences. In these cases, students experience immersive 3D pictures or panoramas, but do not deeply interact with the content. The illusion of embodiment is a product of interactive content and motion tracking, where users can alter and affect their environment and engage with others who share their virtual space. Headsets like the Vive and Occulus Rift fall under this latter category, but it won’t be long before most, if not all, consumer oriented VR technology will be completely immersive and interactive.

1. Long-Term Effects and Prolonged Exposure

2. The Impact of Environment on Agency and Behavior

3. Aggravating Preexisting Psychological or Emotional Issues

4. (Un)Reality and Diminished Real World Interactions

5. Privacy and Data Gathering

 

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more on virtual reality in this IMS blog

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=virtual+reality

death of game consoles

The death of game consoles is upon us

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=consoles

integrated strategic planning

Integrated Strategic Planning and Resource Allocation

Ultimately, aligning plans, people, and resources is about working collaboratively across departments and divisions. This program will give you the tools and techniques needed to accomplish this in a meaningful way. This workshop goes beyond creating a beautiful strategic plan; it’s about the hard work of implementation to move your institution forward.

Google Glass versus Microsoft HoloLens

Here’s one thing Google and Microsoft agree on (and they’re right)

http://www.businessinsider.com/google-and-microsoft-embrace-ar-over-vr-2016-4

Virtual reality, like the new Facebook Oculus and HTC Vive, completely immerse you inside a computer generated world. It’s like being inside a 360-degree video game, or movie, or computer-generated simulation.

according to a report in The Information today, Google’s long-term bet is on augmented reality. The company is making not one but several follow-ups to Glass, and has a project called “Tango” that aims to outfit smartphones with computerized “eyes” that can map a 3D space.

More on augmented reality in this IMS blog

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/?s=augmented&submit=Search

lecture capture and online ed

From the Blended and Online Learning discussion list:

We’re working on a grant program at my unit to improve these lec-capture courses. One of the ways is to train faculty:

  •  We’ve seen that these courses have very little student engagement, especially for online students for whom this is the main medium of instruction. It’s challenging for the instructors to keep the online student in mind as they teach their lec-capture class. This is not surprising, since they’re essentially being asked to teach 2 different audiences simultaneously  – in class and online. However, given that this is not going to change in the near future for us, we’ve begun exploring ways to train faculty to do a better job given the constraints. Below are some ideas:
    • We are in the process of creating a sort of “checklist” to address things that can be done before, during, and after the class and ways of streamlining the process.
    • BEFORE
      • Make faculty familiar with the technology – do tours of rooms, tutorials, short workshops, etc.
      • Syllabus, Schedule and instructional materials are prepared before the semester begins.
      • Learning objectives, outcomes, and assessments are aligned and made transparent to the students.
      • Design pedagogy that is inclusive – for e.g., move discussions online, create groups that include in-class and online students, use language that directly addresses online students, etc.
    • DURING & at the END
      • Review a sampling of videos at the beginning, middle, and end by ourselves and then with the faculty and provide them feedback on the good, the bad, and the ugly – very discreetly. 🙂 It’s going to be a sort of a joint reflection on the class. We believe if we do this a few times with the faculty, they’ll get the message and will make greater effort to include the online student in their instruction. And doing it 3 times will also make visible the changes and progress they make (or not)
      • We also plan to survey the students at the beginning, middle, and at the end of the semester and share the results with the faculty.

Chunking of videos includes preplanning and post production tasks. Faculty can be trained to script their lectures more, create lecture based on “topics” to make chunking and tagging easier. Need to focus on end user experience (online student).

These are some of the ideas. We plan to start implementing them this summer. I’ll share with you our progress. 🙂

Rema

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Rema Nilakanta, Ph.D.
Director of Design & Delivery|
Engineering-LAS Online Learning
1328 Howe Hall
515-294-9259 (office)
515-294-6184 (fax)
http://www.elo.iastate.edu

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On Wed, Jan 27, 2016 at 8:48 AM, Nilakanta, Rema [ELO] <rema@iastate.edu> wrote:

Good Morning!

Thank you all for filling out the survey on the use of lecture capture in higher education. I appreciate your time and interest in this subject.

Attached are the results. I’ve also provided an overview below. The main purpose of this survey was to get an overall idea of how lecture capture is used in HE. I was just curious to see if the way we use it is pretty much similar at other institutions. The finding was inconclusive. My next step is to dig a little deeper – perhaps repurpose this survey for faculty and students. The final goal is to improve these courses – make them as pedagogically sound as possible, given that this technology is here to stay at our campus, at least for the near future. It will certainly require designing faculty training, but I would also like to explore innovative and efficient ways of chunking lecture videos pre and post production.

Let me know if you have any questions or need further information.

Rema

OVERVIEW OF “USE OF LECTURE CAPTURE IN HE” SURVEY RESULTS & FINDINGS

By Rema Nilakanta

rema@iastate.edu

I’ve listed some of the findings that impressed me. They do not follow the order of the questions in the survey. For details, please view the attached report.

Just a quick note – There were 39 respondents, but not all responded to every question. The respondents included instructional and IT support staff and administrators at all levels generally from 4-year public and private universities.

FINDINGS & THEMES

  • Echo 365 and Panopto are the most frequently used lecture capture systems, but Adobe Connect also has several users.
  • The computer screen and the instructor feed are most commonly captured (89% and 79%, respectively). However, some also capture the document camera, the whiteboard, and the graphics pen tablet (53%, 39%, and 32%, respectively).
  • Almost every one (97%) report that they support their recordings with additional course materials in an LMS, while many also use web conferencing to deliver lectures and hold office hours. A sizeable portion of respondents also use online textbooks and publisher sites in their course delivery. Only 18% use lecture capture as the primary means of course delivery.
  • The majority of respondents use full class recordings of an hour or more, while around half also use short segments of 20 minutes or less.
  • The majority of the respondents seem to indicate a campus wide use of lecture capture for different purposes:

o   review of in-class lectures

o   training and advising

o   student presentations (students use the technology to create their presentations/demos/assignments)

o   live streaming of seminars and on-site hosting of conferences for remote students and audiences.

  • Size of the support units ranged from 1 person to 150+ people spread across campus.
  • Similarly, there was a wide range for the number of courses that used lecture capture – as few as 1-2 to a 1000 and more, if one takes into account non-traditional uses.
  • Although the numbers show that a majority (77%) provide full IT support for their lecture capture systems, a closer look at the comments indicates there is a general tendency toward making faculty more self reliant by providing them support when requested, or providing them with fully equipped and automated rooms, personal capture solutions and/or training.
  • Majority seemed satisfied with the lecture capture setup, so did the students.  However, it seemed that the knowledge about student satisfaction was more anecdotal than formal. Other observations include:

o   For people satisfied with the setup, there were quite a few users of Echo 360 and Panopto.

o   Panopto seemed to rise above the rest for its promptness and quality of service. Mediasite got mixed response.

o   There seems to be an awareness of the need to get the lectures captioned.

o   Along with automated lecture capture technology, there seems to be a rise in old ways of doing things – manual (human) recording of events continues and seems preferable, especially in the face of rising costs of lecture capture technology.

  • The top 5 challenges concerning faculty support can be summarized as follows:

o   Training faculty to use the technology – turn on the mic, no recording of white board, do not change settings, take time to learn the technology.

o   Funding and support

o   Ensuring best practices

o   Captioning

o   IP concerns

  • Efforts to address these challenges were related to:

OPERATIONS

–       Keep mic on all the time

–       Use of media asset management systems, like Kaltura (MediaSite)

–       Admins trained to check settings for rooms

–       Disable download of recordings as default setting (addressed IP concerns)

TRAINING

–       Create user groups around technologies

–       Promote communication among instructors using a particular room

–       Training of faculty by instructional design teams on the use of technology and best practices

 

here is more on lecture capture in this IMS blog:

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/?s=lecture+capture&submit=Search

Google Expeditions on VR Tours

Google Expeditions Takes Students on VR Tours of Great Barrier Reef, Buckingham Palace

https://thejournal.com/articles/2016/01/20/google-expeditions-takes-students-on-vr-tours-of-great-barrier-reef-buckingham-palace.aspx

Sign in here: https://www.google.com/edu/expeditions/. A minimum of 6 interested teachers. In order to take as many students as possible on an Expedition, we’ll visit schools showing the most interest first.

Here is a taste of what lies ahead:

When viewing on a mobile phone, the user can change the point of view of the video fluidly in 360 degrees simply by moving the device around.

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