Searching for "vine"

Helping a psychology student from Edinburgh Napier with his essay:

To what extent have the new generation of psychodynamic psychoanalysts addressed the issues raised by the ferocious critiques of Freud’s work that have emerged?

Almond, R. (2006). How do we bridge the gap? Commentary on Luyten, Blatt, and Corveleyn. Journal of the American Psychoanalytic Association, 54(2), 611–618.

Ambrosio, J. (2010). A Fearsome Trap: The will to know, the obligation to confess, and the Freudian subject of desire. Educational Philosophy & Theory, 42(7), 728–741.

Appelbaum, J. (2013). Psychoanalysis and philosophy: Nurturing dialogues. The American Journal of Psychoanalysis, 73(2), 117–120.

Auxéméry, Y. (2015). « Névrose » et « Psychose »: Quelles définitions pour la psychiatrie contemporaine ? = “Neurosis” and “psychosis”: What definitions for contemporary psychiatry? Annales Médico-Psychologiques, 173(8), 643–648. http://doi.org/10.1016/j.amp.2014.12.015

Brookes, C. E. (2015). Review of From classical to contemporary psychoanalysis: A critique and integration. Psychodynamic Psychiatry, 43(4), 507–512.

Cohen, J. (2007). Interdisciplinary Psychoanalysis and the Education of Children: Psychoanalytic and Educational Partnerships. Psychoanalytic Study of the Child, 62, 180–207.

Cooper-White, P. (2002). “Higher Powers and Infernal Regions”: Models of Mind in Freud’s Interpretation of Dreams and Contemporary Psychoanalysis, and Their Implications for Pastoral Theology. Pastoral Psychology, 50(5), 319–343.

Cooper-White, P. (2014). Review of Psychoanalysis, monotheism and morality: The Sigmund Freud Museum Symposia, 2009–2011. Journal of the American Psychoanalytic Association, 62(6), 1163–1170. http://doi.org/10.1177/0003065114558924

Cortina, M. (2012). Review of Psychoanalysis and motivational systems. A new look. Psychodynamic Psychiatry, 40(2), 357–364.

Daldin, H. (1988). The fate of the sexually abused child. Clinical Social Work Journal, 16(1), 22–32.

Dimen, M. (2014). Inside the Revolution: Power, Sex, and Technique in Freud’s “‘Wild’ Analysis”. Psychoanalytic Dialogues, 24(5), 499–515.

Eckardt, M. H. (2003). Evolution of psychoanalysis. Journal of the American Academy of Psychoanalysis, 31(4), 726–728.

Eliman, S. J. (2005). Rothstein as a Self and Object Freudian. Psychoanalytic Dialogues, 15(3), 459–471.

Friedman, N. (1976). From the experiential in therapy to experiential psychotherapy: A history. Psychotherapy: Theory, Research & Practice, 13(3), 236–243. http://doi.org/10.1037/h0088347

Golding, R. (1982). Freud, psychoanalysis, and sociology:  some observations on the sociological analysis of the individual. British Journal of Sociology, 33(4), 545–562.

Gordon, P. (2014). Radical analyses? Psychodynamic Practice, 20(1), 68–74.

Granqvist, P. (2006). On the relation between secular and divine relationships: An emerging attachment perspective and a critique of the “depth” approaches. International Journal for the Psychology of Religion, 16(1), 1–18. http://doi.org/10.1207/s15327582ijpr1601_1

Greenwood, D. (2010). Embracing the “allegiance effect” as a positive quality in research into the psychological therapies-exploring the concept of “influence”. European Journal of Psychotherapy & Counselling, 12(1), 41–54.

Hansen, I. A. (2007). Buddhist Influences on the Idea of the Unconscious. Psychological Perspectives, 50(2), 181–197.

Jeffrey M JJ Jackson. (2008). Philosophy as Melancholia: Freud, Kant, Foucault. Psychoanalysis, Culture & Society, 13(3), 299–315.

Jones, G. Y. (1999). “Beyond the Oedipal Complex”:  Freud and Lacan revisited. Psychodynamic Counselling, 5(4), 453.

Kerr, J. (2012). Review of From classical to contemporary psychoanalysis: A critique and integration. Psychoanalytic Review, 99(5), 785–792.

Knoblauch, S. H. (2005). Body Rhythms and the Unconscious: Toward an Expanding of Clinical Attention. Psychoanalytic Dialogues, 15(6), 807–827.

Kronemyer, D. E. (2011). Freud’s Illusion: New Approaches to Intractable Issues. International Journal for the Psychology of Religion, 21(4), 249–275.

Kruger, L.-M. (2006). A tribute to 150 years of Sigmund Freud: Not mastering the mind: Freud and the “Forgotten Material” of Psychology. Psycho-Analytic Psychotherapy in South Africa, 14(2), 1–12.

Lee, N.-N. (2014). Sublimated or castrated psychoanalysis? Adorno’s critique of the revisionist psychoanalysis: An introduction to “The Revisionist Psychoanalysis”. Philosophy & Social Criticism, 40(3), 309–338.

Lenthall, A. (2007). Review of Psychotherapy and phenomenology: On Freud, Husserl and Heidegger. Psychodynamic Practice: Individuals, Groups and Organisations, 13(4), 423–427. http://doi.org/10.1080/14753630701609939

Lothane, Z. (2006). Freud’s legacy–is it still with us? Psychoanalytic Psychology, 23(2), 285–301. http://doi.org/10.1037/0736-9735.23.2.285

Metcalf, R. (2000). THE TRUTH OF SHAME-CONSCIOUSNESS IN FREUD AND PHENOMENOLOGY. Journal of Phenomenological Psychology, 31(1), 1–18.

Mook, B. (2007). Review of Psychotherapy and phenomenology. The Humanistic Psychologist, 35(4), 401–403. http://doi.org/10.1080/08873260701593417

Moyaert, P. (2013). The Death Drive and the Nucleus of the Ego: An Introduction to Freudian Metaphysics. Southern Journal of Philosophy, 51, 94–119.

Noys, B. (2009). Revolution in Psychology: Alienation to Emancipation The Lacanian Left: Psychoanalysis, Theory, and Politics. Historical Materialism, 17(1), 183–190.

Palombo, J. (2013). The Self As a Complex Adaptive System Part I: Complexity, Metapsychology, and Developmental Theories. Psychoanalytic Social Work, 20(1), 1–25.

Pavón-Cuéllar, D. (2014). The Freudo-Marxist Tradition and the Critique of Psychotherapeutic Ideology. Psychotherapy & Politics International, 12(3), 208–219.

Pedroni, I. (2015). Finding New Ways of Belonging Through Religious Experience in the Framework of a Therapeutic Encounter. International Journal of Psychoanalytic Self Psychology, 10(4), 343–354.

Price, M. (1995). The illusion of theory: Discussion of R. D. Chessick’s “Poststructural psychoanalysis or wild analysis?.” Journal of the American Academy of Psychoanalysis, 23(1), 63–70.

Robinson, P. (1985). FREUD UNDER SIEGE. Halcyone (01986449), 7, 1–15.

Rogers, R. (1989). Review of The Psychotic Core. Psychoanalytic Psychology, 6(3), 367–373. http://doi.org/10.1037/h0079741

Samuels, R. (1998). Passing beyond ego psychology: Freud, Lacan and the end of analysis. Clinical Studies: International Journal of Psychoanalysis, 4(1), 93–104.

Schafer, R. (1970). Requirements for a critique of the theory of catharsis. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 35(1, Pt.1), 13–17. http://doi.org/10.1037/h0029613

Schafer, R. (1975). Psychoanalysis without psychodynamics. The International Journal of Psychoanalysis, 56(1), 41–55.

Shafranske, E. P. (1992). A Psychoanalytic Response to Hood. International Journal for the Psychology of Religion, 2(3), 161.

SHILL, M. (2011). Intersubjectivity and the Ego. Psychoanalytic Social Work, 18(1), 1–22.

Thomas, A. (2007). Practical Irrationality, Reflexivity and Sartre’s Regress Argument. Teorema, 26(3), 113–121.

Tillman, J. G. (1998). Psychodynamic psychotherapy, religious beliefs, and self-disclosure. American Journal of Psychotherapy, 52(3), 273.

Wax, M. L. (1995). Method as Madness: Science, hermeneutics, and art in psychoanalysis. Journal of the American Academy of Psychoanalysis, 23(4), 525–543.

Webster, J. (2013). Critique and cure: A dream of uniting psychoanalysis and philosophy. The American Journal of Psychoanalysis, 73(2), 138–157. http://doi.org/10.1057/ajp.2013.1

Weinberger, J., & Westen, D. (2001). Science and psychodynamics: From arguments about Freud to data. Psychological Inquiry, 12(3), 129–132. http://doi.org/10.1207/S15327965PLI1203_02

Zepf, S. (2012). Repression and Substitutive Formation: The Relationship Between Freud’s Concepts Reconsidered. Psychoanalytic Review, 99(3), 397–420.

Zepf, S. (2013). Abwehr, Verdrängung und Ersatzbildung: Die Beziehung zwischen Freuds Konzepten neu organisiert. Defence, Repression and Substitutive Formation: The Relationship between Freud’s Reorganized Concepts, 29(4), 499–515.

Academic Journal

By: Freeman, Tabitha. Studies in Gender & Sexuality. Spring2008, Vol. 9 Issue 2, p113-139. 27p. DOI: 10.1080/15240650801935156., Database: EBSCO MegaFILE

Subjects: ESSAY (Literary form); PSYCHOANALYSIS; FATHERHOOD; OEDIPUS complex; PARENT & child; FATHER & child; PATRILINEAL kinship

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Generation Z bibliography

Levine, A. (2012). Generation on a Tightrope: A Portrait of Today’s College Student (1 edition). San Francisco: Jossey-Bass. as reported in the IMS blog of:
https://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2014/01/08/visit-to-mankato-cetl/

Additional bibliography:

http://generationz.com.au/education/

Rosenfeld, E., & Loertscher, D. V. (2007). Toward a 21st-Century School Library Media Program. Scarecrow Press.

https://books.google.com/books?hl=en&lr=&id=brLbpR6dI8sC&oi=fnd&pg=PA235&dq=generation+z&ots=9CSv7vT6Bn&sig=RAKh-H98EVQ8x61YbnExS02ZlV8#v=onepage&q=generation%20z&f=false

Jeff Feiertag, & Zane L. Berge. (2008). Training Generation N: how educators should approach the Net Generation. Education + Training, 50(6), 457–464. http://doi.org/10.1108/00400910810901782 http://www.emeraldinsight.com/doi/full/10.1108/00400910810901782
Malone, K. (2007). The bubble‐wrap generation: children growing up in walled gardens. Environmental Education Research, 13(4), 513–527. http://doi.org/10.1080/13504620701581612 http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/13504620701581612
some of the changes in childhood environmental behaviours I explore children and parent relationships, in particular, the phenomena of ‘bubble‐wrapping’ children to appease the anxieties of some middle class parents.
Ivanova, A., & Ivanova, G. (2009). Net-generation Learning Style: A Challenge for Higher Education. In Proceedings of the International Conference on Computer Systems and Technologies and Workshop for PhD Students in Computing (pp. 72:1–72:6). New York, NY, USA: ACM. http://doi.org/10.1145/1731740.1731818 http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=1731818
Ivanova, A., & Smirkarov, A. (2009). The New Generations of Students  and the Future of e – Learning in Higher Education. Presented at the International Conference on e – Learni ng and the Knowledge Society  –  e – Learning’09. Retrieved from http://www.iit.bas.bg/esf/docs/2009/thenewgenerationsstudentsfuturee-learninghigheredu.pdf
Montana, P., & Petit, F. (2008). MOTIVATING GENERATION X AND Y ON THE JOB  AND PREPARING Z. GLOBAL JOURNAL OF BUSINESS RESEARCH, 2(2), 1–30. http://www.theibfr.com/ARCHIVE/GJBR-V2-N2-2008.pdf
McCrindle, M. (n.d.). Understanding Generation Y . The Australian Leadership Foundation. Retrieved from http://emoneco.net/info_docs/UnderstandingGenY.pdf
Igel, C., & Urquhort, V. (2012). Generation Z, meet cooperative learning. Middle School Journal, 43(4), 16–21. http://www.jstor.org/stable/41432109?seq=1#page_scan_tab_contents
Levickaite, R. (2010). Generations X, Y, Z: how social networks form the concept of the world without borders (the case of Lithuania)/Y, X, Z kartos: pasaulio be sienu idejos formavimas naudojantis socialiniais tinklais (Lietuvos Atvejis). LIMES, 3(2), 170. Retrieved from http://go.galegroup.com/ps/i.do?id=GALE%7CA250135086&v=2.1&u=stcloud_main&it=r&p=EAIM&sw=w&asid=934b505505fbc57b849a3fb9eefe7871
Lynch, K., & Hogan, J. (2012). How Irish Political Parties are Using Social Networking Sites to Reach Generation Z: an Insight into a New Online Social Network in a Small Democracy. Irish Communication Review, 13. Retrieved from http://arrow.dit.ie/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1124&context=buschmarart
Benckendorff, P., Moscardo, G., & Pendergast, D. (2010). Tourism and Generation Y. CABI. Retrieved from https://books.google.com/books?hl=en&lr=&id=vNsJazDA74UC&oi=fnd&pg=PA1&dq=%22generation+z%22+and+education&ots=g9e1CaCH6x&sig=OBkL2OFoxd-EBc6EHW3WJEe2tr8#v=onepage&q&f=false
Parker, K., Czech, D., Burdette, T., Stewart, J., Biber, D., Easton, L., … McDaniel, T. (2012). The Preferred Coaching Styles of Generation Z Athletes:  A Qualitative Study. Journal of Coaching Education, 5(2), 5–97.
Greydanus, D. E., & Greydanus, M. M. (2012). Internet use, misuse, and addiction in adolescents: current issues and challenges. International Journal of Adolescent Medicine and Health, 24(4), 283–289. http://doi.org/10.1515/ijamh.2012.041

——————–

more on Generation Z in this IMS blog

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/?s=generation+z&submit=Search
https://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2015/09/19/gen-z/
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2014/03/27/who-is-coming-to-college-after-the-millennials/

Visual Social Marketing

Visual Social Marketing 101

http://mashable.com/2014/07/17/visual-social-marketing-101/

Snapchat

Of the three platforms, Snapchat is the one marketers may have the most difficult time getting a grip on. The tools are intended to produce clips that are less polished than creatives are used to and the platform isn’t designed for reach.

Vine

Vine is the newest of the three platforms, though many learned of it before Snapchat gained more mainstream attention last year. Vine videos are often whimsical and some even seem effortless, but the most popular users may spend hours or even days creating memorable stop motion videos.

Instagram

Many of the world’s top brands are now on Instagram and for good reason. The social network has more than 200 million users, integrates well with its parent company Facebook and lends itself more to the types of professional photographs and 15-second video spots that marketers are accustomed to.

 

Social Videos With Your Smartphone

How to Create Social Videos With Your Smartphone

http://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/create-social-videos-smartphone/

Do you want to create videos without having costly equipment?

#1: Choose Your Channel

Instagram allows you to post videos 3 to 15 seconds in length.

Vine lets you publish videos up to 6 seconds long.

YouTube offers the ability to upload almost any video regardless of length or quality.

#2: Choose a Video Style

stop motion, time-lapse and standard video

#3: Shoot a Stop Motion Video With Vine

#4: Shoot a Time-Lapse Video With Hyperlapse

My note: Time-Lapse Video is available on the new “Camera” feature of iPAD and iTouch

#5: Shoot a Regular Video

#6: Edit Your Video

Interactive Marketing and Social Media

Interactive Marketing and Social Media

deCesare, Gina, Miltenoff, Plamen

Section 5, T/TH – 11:00am – 12:15pm and, Section 7, T – 6:oopm – 9:00pm

http://media4.stcloudstate.edu/scsu

  1. Introduction. Who am I, what I do:

http://lrts.stcloudstate.edu/library/general/ims/default.asp
http://web.stcloudstate.edu/pmiltenoff/lib290/

  1. What is the purpose of the meeting today: Interactive Marketing and Social Media
  • Define top 3 questions on your mind and be ready to share

Jerry Seinfeld’s 5 Tips On Social Media Etiquette
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2014/06/26/social-media-netiquette-fun-with-jerry-seinfeld/

Social Media: do you use it and how?…
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MLNWWZN8BAA

  1. PPT, e.g. slide 27, by sharing with the students resources (most of them are infographics,) about best time when to apply social media marketing.

Social Media Examiner has plenty to say about it:
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2014/10/01/social-media-management/

 

  1. Ideas and directions:
    Peruse over the 3 groups of directions and ideas and choose one. Study it. Outline what do you anticipate being useful for your future work. Add at least 3 more ideas of your own, which complement the information from this group of information sources.

 

 

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2014/09/21/social-media-cocktail/
time-saving social media tools
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2014/09/19/time-saving-social-media-tools/
30 Little-Known Features of the Social Media Sites
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2014/09/19/social-media-features/
26 Creative Ways to Publish Social Media Updates
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2014/08/28/26-creative-ways-to-publish-social-media-updates/
How to Write a Social Media Policy to Empower Employees
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2014/07/01/social-media-how-to-write-a-social-media-policy-to-empower-employees/
How to Create Awesome Online Videos: Tools and Software to Make it Easy
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2014/06/24/social-media-how-to-create-awesome-online-videos-tools-and-software-to-make-it-easy/

 

 

 

 

Emerging Social Networks

Emerging Social Networks

http://www.practicalecommerce.com/articles/72917-13-Emerging-Social-Networks-to-Watch

Learnist

Learnist is a crowd-sourced collection of knowledge, with web, text and video content covering thousands of topics. Boards are curated by knowledge leaders, providing content from the people who know it best. Create your own expert knowledge boards on the Learnist website and browse with the iOS and Android apps. Learnist was launched in 2012.

Sulia

Sulia is a subject-based social network to connect users with expert sources. Sulia seeks to help people to discover new sources and engage with their interests. If you’re an expert and would like to reach the audience Sulia has to offer, contact its staff, at experts@sulia.com. Sulia also offers a Sulia Select program, which matches top experts with leading publishers and retailers.

Pheed

Pheed is a free social multimedia platform, available on iOS, Android and via the web. Pheed users share voice-notes, music, photos, videos, text, and live broadcasts. Pheed channel holders can also monetize their content by charging a monthly subscription fee (between $1.99 and $34.99) or by charging for pay-per-view live broadcast events. Pheed launched with an iOS app in 2012 and an Android app in 2013.

Medium

Medium is a place where people share stories and ideas — a great place to generate expert content. Medium is designed to be collaborative, with tools to let readers offer feedback. Medium is also designed to help you find an audience, through a combination of algorithmic and editorial curation. Medium launched in 2012, and its iOS phone app launched in 2014.

Cyber Dust

Cyber Dust is a platform for temporary mobile messaging. Texts sent via Cyber Dust automatically disappear 24 seconds after being read. Users can blast messages and locations, and send disappearing promotional content, like stickers, animated GIFs, URLs and more. An alternative to Snapchat, Cyber Dust is the latest startup of maverick investor Mark Cuban, whose own legal woes motivated him to create the app.

ShareBloc

ShareBloc is a Reddit-like link-sharing community for professionals to curate, distribute, and discuss business content. ShareBloc could also be a good resource for small businesses in the B2B sector. The site launched in 2013 as a peer-review platform for members to rate and review vendors. ShareBloc’s main obstacle will come from the competition it faces from heavyweight LinkedIn.

Thumb

Thumb is a crowdsourcing platform to ask any question and quickly receive 50 to 100 responses. Easily filter by topic to get relevant responses and new content. Thumb is a resource for any small business looking for quick feedback on a new product or service. Originally launched in 2010 as a tool to give shopping feedback, Thumb has become a place to discover and give feedback on seemingly anything. The mobile app is available for Android and iOS.

Impossible

Impossible is a network where people help each other out. People who need help post a request, which is shown to users most likely to fulfill it. Those with help to give can share time, skills and objects for free, as they build kindness profiles. While this network is geared toward altruism, it may be a good place for a business to put its product to work.

We Heart It

We Heart It is an image-based social network focused on inspiration, expression, and creativity. It’s a hipper version of Pinterest, aimed at “highly-engaged, tech-savvy, and consumption-focused millennials.” We Heart It has over 20 million monthly visitors to discover, collect, and share images on its mobile apps and website.

Chirp

Chirp lets you send a message using sound — a chirp — to anyone running the app near you. Share photos, links, notes, and more, all from your built-in iPhone speaker. Chirp could be a powerful marketing tool for location-based businesses looking to entice passers-by. Chirp’s iOS app launched in 2012, and its Android app launched in 2013.

Mobli

Mobli is a social application for sharing mobile photos and unlimited-length videos. It’s a feature-packed alternative to Instagram. Broadcast your live events, use photo and video filters update weekly, create looping videos, follow locations and hashtags, and more. In November of 2013, Mobil announced a capital raise of $60 million from billionaire Carlos Slim’s América Móvil.–

Vine

Vine is an application for creating and sharing six-second looping videos. Vine officially launched in 2013 (after Twitter purchased it in 2012) and quickly became the most-used video sharing application. Recently, Vine launched a new website with a variety of features to discover videos, such as channels, trending tags, and curated content. The change could deliver further gains for Vine, which according to GlobalWebIndex is used by a quarter of U.S. teens.

Snapchat

Chef the movie

There is a movie about a middle-aged cook, his early-teen son, who TWEETs and VINEs and helps his dad’s career: http://www.imdb.com/title/tt2883512/

chef movie, poster

Good actors but weak plot and movie. My blog entry is not about the movie quality, but about the notion that social media is saving the main character’s career and helps him self-promote.

Backchannel: is it only K12 moving that direction?

backchannel — a digital conversation that runs concurrently with a face-to-face activity — provides students with an outlet to engage in conversation.

In a recent article by Edutopia:
The Backchannel: Giving Every Student a Voice in the Blended Mobile Classroom. (n.d.). Edutopia. Retrieved May 28, 2014, from http://www.edutopia.org/blog/backchannel-student-voice-blended-classroom-beth-holland

the author brings yet another argument in support of using the BYOD movement in K12 to promote usage of mobile devices and social media FOR the learning process, rather then seeking ways to shut them off.
It seems that Higher Ed is lagging behind in their paradigm shift toward Backchanneling.
What do you think must be done at SCSU to seek the usage of mobile devices and/or social media to involved students in the learning process?
Pollard, E. A. (2014). Tweeting on the Backchannel of the Jumbo-Sized Lecture Hall: Maximizing Collective Learning in a World History Survey. History Teacher, 47(3), 329-354.
http://login.libproxy.stcloudstate.edu/login?qurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ebscohost.com%2flogin.aspx%3fdirect%3dtrue%26db%3dkeh%26AN%3d96310010%26site%3deds-live%26scope%3dsiteCamiel, L. D., Goldman-Levine, J. D., Kostka-Rokosz, M. D., & McCloskey, W. W. (2014). Twitter as an in-class backchannel tool in a large required pharmacy course. American Journal Of Pharmaceutical Education, (3),
http://login.libproxy.stcloudstate.edu/login?qurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ebscohost.com%2flogin.aspx%3fdirect%3dtrue%26db%3dedsgao%26AN%3dedsgcl.369220588%26site%3deds-live%26scope%3dsiteAagard, H., Bowen, K., & Olesova, L. (2010). Hotseat: Opening the Backchannel in Large Lectures. EDUCAUSE Quarterly, 33(3),
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Cronin, J. J. (2011). The Classroom as a Virtual Community: An Experience with Student Backchannel Discourse. Business Education Innovation Journal, 3(2), 56-65.
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Pohl, A., Gehlen-Baum, V., & Bry, F. (2012). Enhancing the Digital Backchannel Backstage on the Basis of a Formative User Study. International Journal Of Emerging Technologies In Learning, 7(1), 33.
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Jarrett, K., & Devine, M. A. (2010). How to use backchanneling in your classroom. Education Digest, (1), 41.
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Reid, A. (2011). Social media assemblages in digital humanities: From backchannel to buzz. doi:10.1108/S2044-9968(2011)0000003019
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