Searching for "web design"

university web page design

Urgent: Today’s students need a digitally fluent college website-here’s how

By Liz Schulte August 3rd, 2017

Students can no longer remember the world before the technology revolution. Digital fluency isn’t optional for schools; it’s a must.

Urgent: Today’s students need a digitally fluent college website-here’s how

A good school site should:

  • Demonstrate its brand
  • Be easy to navigate
  • Show students a clear pathway to success
  • Highlight the best qualities of the school
  • Provide information visitors want to find

Pay close attention to your website’s analytics. Where are visitors going? How long are they staying? When do they leave? Are they finding where they want to go while they are there?

92 percent of Americans 18-29 years old own a smartphone. They will interact with your site from their phone. If it is frustrating, they will be frustrated with the school. The site needs a responsive design that will allow it to adapt to the size of any screen.

implement A/B testing to make sure the new design is improving on functionality and not just aesthetics. Also, make sure your website is ADA compliant.

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more on academic web page design in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=web+design

library website content strategy

Developing a Website Content Strategy

Instructor: Shoshana Mayden, Dates: July 3-28, 2017
http://libraryjuiceacademy.com/049-content-strategy.php

Shoshana Mayden is a content strategist with the University of Arizona Libraries in Tucson, Arizona. She advises on issues related to website content and contributes to developing a content strategy across multiple channels for the library. She works with content managers and library stakeholders to re-write, re-think and re-organize content for the main library website, as well as develop workflows related to the lifecycle of content. She also a copy editor for Weave: the Journal of Library User Experience.

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Information Architecture: Designing Navigation for Library Websites

Instructor: Laura-Edythe Coleman

http://libraryjuiceacademy.com/046-designing-navigation.php

Information Architecture is an essential component of user-centered design of information spaces, especially websites. Website navigation is a key design device to help users search and browse library websites and information systems. The design of Website navigation can be simple or complex, flat or deep. In all cases, website navigation should take into account information architecture (IA) best practices, common user tasks in the library domain, user research, analytics and information seeking models.

Laura-Edythe Coleman is a Museum Informaticist: her focus is on the point of convergence for museums, information, people, and technology. Knowing that societies need museums for creating and sustaining cultural memory, she strives to help communities co-create heritage collections with museums. She holds a PhD in Information Science, a Masters of Library and Information Science and a Bachelors of Fine Arts. She can be reached via Twitter: @lauraedythe, website: http://www.lauraedythe.com, or by email lauraedythecoleman@gmail.com

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Content Strategy for Library Websites from Rebecca Blakiston
http://www.academia.edu/12370418/Content_Strategy_for_Library_Websites 
https://steadfastlibrarian.wordpress.com/2012/06/27/211/
https://connect.library.utoronto.ca/download/attachments/25199917/2013_-__-_DevelopingaContentStrategyforanAcademicLibraryWebs%5Bretrieved-2015-11-17%5D.pdf
https://www.researchgate.net/publication/271758861_Developing_a_Content_Strategy_for_an_Academic_Library_Website
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Other resources: 
http://guiseppegetto.com/ux-content-strategy-library/

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more on Libary web site in this IMS blog
https://www.lib.umich.edu/blog-tags/web-content-strategy
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=library+web+page

instructional design librarian

Conversations With Blended Librarians: The Evolving Instructional Design Librarian now available

Published on

Joelle Pitts is an Instructional Design Librarian and Associate Professor at Kansas State University Libraries. She is responsible for the creation and maintenance of web-based learning objects and environments aimed at improving the information literacy of the Kansas State University community. She leads the New Literacies Alliance, an inter-institutional information literacy consortium. Her research interests include distance education and e-learning theory and design, library user experience (UX), as well as the design and implementation of games-based learning environments.

The view the recorded session visit http://blendedlibrarian.learningtimes.net/

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more on blended librarian in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=blended+librarian

academic institution website

IT #2: 5 ways your college website turns away students (continued)

http://www.ecampusnews.com/it-newsletter/2-college-website-students/

According to the KDG report, prospective students are not only used to reading short bits of information thanks to social media, but many incoming freshman read at a 7th grade level.

“This means your college website must be at the 7th grade level, especially the sections used to attract prospects and to guide them through the application process. No, we’re not kidding,

1. Reading like the New York Times.

2. Requiring Form Fills.

prospective students are often fatigued by long forms that they must complete in order to get the information they need and will quickly leave the website. “Not only will a live chat feature save students time, it can also save your admissions office time answering questions from prospects and applicants

3. Not Understanding What’s Important.

a delicate balance between static and antiquated, and being too interactive. “Don’t get so caught up in the design that there’s a disconnect between what your institution is and marketing gimmicks. You also don’t want super technical, information-filled pages.”

4. Using Fake Images.

images of students posed for the camera won’t do, either. They want to see students, like them, doing the things students do on campus—with exceptions, of course…Candid images, combined with some documentary-style photos from important events on campus, will go a long way toward creating a website that invites visitors to look deeper.
looked at sites like Airbnb.

5. Using Clichéd Statements about Passé Issues

They may read at a 7th grade level, but that doesn’t mean they can’t recognize a cliché.

boasting about unique accomplishments with current relevance for students in a down-to-earth way, such as mentioning a good acceptance rate or a special program for those with learning disabilities. Positive statistics about campus crime rates, successful career counseling efforts or facts about innovative STEM programs are also good talking points.

For more information on the KDG report and blog synopsis, click here.

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more on university web pages in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2016/03/22/university-web-page/

learning space design

An Open Repository of Learning Space Design

The cross-institutional FLEXspace team created a global forum for sharing examples of technology-enhanced learning environments and their impact on teaching and learning.

By Meg Lloyd 10/12/16

https://campustechnology.com/articles/2016/10/12/an-open-repository-of-learning-space-design.aspx

The Flexible Learning Environments eXchange (FLEXspace) a highly searchable, peer-reviewed repository of technology-enhanced learning spaces, freely available to the higher ed community.

FLEXspace uses the Artstor Shared Shelf platform to create its open education resource and share it with the higher education community.

A user begins by accessing the public facing FLEXspace website, which describes each project.

Ultimately, FLEXspace, used in conjunction with other resources like the Learning Space Rating System, will not only promote understanding of other institutions’ efforts, but also assist individual campus stakeholders in creating master learning space plans.

 

 

 

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more on learning spaces in this IMS blog

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=learning+space

tech curriculum design

Dell and Microsoft sponsored.

Register for this complimentary webcast on July 19th to learn how your school or district can design a tech curriculum that matches the future needs of your students today.

During this interactive presentation, you’ll hear how Kennewick School District is giving its students a head start with access to modern tech tools they are likely to use in the real world. Find out how the right tech plan can enable innovative teaching and learning at your school.

Join us as Ron Cone, Kennewick School District CIO, shares:

  • How to design a tech curriculum that matches your students’ future career needs
  • Tips for selecting the right tech to support that curriculum
  • Managing the nuts and bolts of deploying and managing that tech
  • Assessing curriculum and student success

Register »

Thank you,

Linda Briggs
Senior Contributing Editor
THE Journal

instructional designers and tech adoption

Survey: Instructional Designers ‘Pivotal’ in Tech Adoption

By Dian Schaffhauser 05/09/16

https://campustechnology.com/articles/2016/05/09/survey-instructional-designers-pivotal-in-tech-adoption.aspx

Managing projects is the most common task instructional designers undertake during their days, followed by technology and pedagogical training. Their biggest obstacle to success on the job is faculty resistance. The most important expertise they possess as a whole is the ability to learn new technologies, followed by project management and learning science or theory. Their favorite tools to work with are Camtasia and Adobe products; their least-favorite are Blackboard and learning management systems in general.

  • Consider adding more resources in the area of instructional design. If that isn’t possible, at least consider involving instructional designers “early” and “often” during technology transitions.”
  • “Incentivize” faculty to work with instructional designers “from the get-go” in order to help them learn how to engage with their students and expand class time through the use of online tools.
  • Technology providers should work closely with instructional designers in the selection of digital tools.

The report, “Instructional Design in Higher Education,” is freely available on the Intentional Futures website here.

Instructional Design in Higher Education

http://intentionalfutures.com/reports/instructional_design/

p. 4 Graph: median number of instructional designers by type of institution. According to the graph, SCSU must have between 3 and 16 instructional designers.

p. 10.“While a ‘jack-of-all-trades’ can get by in instructional design, the best instructional designers are ‘aces-of-many-trades’,with authentic experience and training in all aspects of the process.”

p. 12“Management choose[s] tools that are cheap and never ask[s] about integration or accessibility.Then we spend enormous amounts of time trying to get them to work.”

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more in this IMS blog on instructional design

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=instructional

Re-conceptualizing Librarianship as a Design Discipline

Re-conceptualizing Librarianship as a Design Discipline

From ‘Design Thinking’ to ‘Design Knowing’

https://goo.gl/yLrG8l

Rachel Ivy Clarke, Ph.D. (@archivy) discussed the theoretical underpinnings that distinguish design knowledge from scientific knowledge and how it is relevant to research, teaching and practice in librarianship.

Recent years have seen an upsurge of interest in applying “design thinking” to library work, but librarianship also aligns with “design knowing”—foundations of knowledge in design that differentiate it from science.

The Blended Librarians Online Community for the webcast of the session

problem solving – who is doing and how.
how the problem is framed. e.g. is the classification system for the librarians or for the students. or both; a wicked problem

design is not an end product, but an ongoing
iteration. a procedure in which repetition of a sequence of operations yields results successively closer to a desired result
and reflection
in design, reflection is going throughout the entire process.

repertoire is the accumulation but not acknowledged.

rationale – why; critique, constructive, so what – research and education and practice

universal design

Universal Design for Libraries and Librarians

Instructors: Jessica Olin, Director of the Library, Robert H. Parker Library, Wesley College; and Holly Mabry, Digital Services Librarian, Gardner-Webb University

Offered: April 11 – May 27, 2016
A Moodle based web course with asynchronous weekly content lessons, tutorials, assignments, and groups discussion.

Register Online, page arranged by session date (login required)

Universal Design is the idea of designing products, places, and experiences to make them accessible to as broad a spectrum of people as possible, without requiring special modifications or adaptations. This course will present an overview of universal design as a historical movement, as a philosophy, and as an applicable set of tools. Students will learn about the diversity of experiences and capabilities that people have, including disabilities (e.g. physical, learning, cognitive, resulting from age and/or accident), cultural backgrounds, and other abilities. The class will also give students the opportunity to redesign specific products or environments to make them more universally accessible and usable.

Takeaways
By the end of this class, students will be able to…

  • Articulate the ethical, philosophical, and practical aspects of Universal Design as a method and movement – both in general and as it relates to their specific work and life circumstances
  • Demonstrate the specific pedagogical, ethical, and customer service benefits of using Universal Design principles to develop and recreate library spaces and services in order to make them more broadly accessible
  • Integrate the ideals and practicalities of Universal Design into library spaces and services via a continuous critique and evaluation cycle

 

Here’s the Course Page

Jessica Olin is the Director of the Library, Robert H. Parker Library, Wesley College. Ms. Olin received her MLIS from Simmons College in 2003 and an MAEd, with a concentration in Adult Education, from Touro University International. Her first position in higher education was at Landmark College, a college that is specifically geared to meeting the unique needs of people with learning differences. While at Landmark, Ms. Olin learned about the ethical, theoretical, and practical aspects of universal design. She has since taught an undergraduate course for both the education and the entrepreneurship departments at Hiram College on the subject.

Holly Mabry received her MLIS from UNC-Greensboro in 2009. She is currently the Digital Services Librarian at Gardner-Webb University where she manages the university’s institutional repository, and teaches the library’s for-credit online research skills course. She also works for an international virtual reference service called Chatstaff. Since finishing her MLIS, she has done several presentations at local and national library conferences on implementing universal design in libraries with a focus on accessibility for patrons with disabilities.

Dates:

February 29 – March 31, 2016

Costs:

  • LITA Member: $135
  • ALA Member: $195
  • Non-member: $260

 

Technical Requirements:

Moodle login info will be sent to registrants the week prior to the start date. The Moodle-developed course site will include weekly new content lessons and is composed of self-paced modules with facilitated interaction led by the instructor. Students regularly use the forum and chat room functions to facilitate their class participation. The course web site will be open for 1 week prior to the start date for students to have access to Moodle instructions and set their browser correctly. The course site will remain open for 90 days after the end date for students to refer back to course material.

Registration Information:

Register Online, page arranged by session date (login required)
OR
Mail or fax form to ALA Registration
OR
call 1-800-545-2433 and press 5
OR
email registration@ala.org

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