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university web page design

Urgent: Today’s students need a digitally fluent college website-here’s how

By Liz Schulte August 3rd, 2017

Students can no longer remember the world before the technology revolution. Digital fluency isn’t optional for schools; it’s a must.

Urgent: Today’s students need a digitally fluent college website-here’s how

A good school site should:

  • Demonstrate its brand
  • Be easy to navigate
  • Show students a clear pathway to success
  • Highlight the best qualities of the school
  • Provide information visitors want to find

Pay close attention to your website’s analytics. Where are visitors going? How long are they staying? When do they leave? Are they finding where they want to go while they are there?

92 percent of Americans 18-29 years old own a smartphone. They will interact with your site from their phone. If it is frustrating, they will be frustrated with the school. The site needs a responsive design that will allow it to adapt to the size of any screen.

implement A/B testing to make sure the new design is improving on functionality and not just aesthetics. Also, make sure your website is ADA compliant.

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more on academic web page design in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=web+design

Scopus webinar

Scopus Content: High quality, historical depth and expert curation

Bibliographic Indexing Leader

Register for the September 28th webinar

https://www.brighttalk.com/webcast/13703/275301

metadata: counts of papers by yer, researcher, institution, province, region and country. scientific fields subfields
metadata in one-credit course as a topic:

publisher – suppliers =- Elsevier processes – Scopus Data

h-index: The h-index is an author-level metric that attempts to measure both the productivity and citation impact of the publications of a scientist or scholar. The index is based on the set of the scientist’s most cited papers and the number of citations that they have received in other publications.

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https://www.brighttalk.com/webcast/9995/275813

Librarians and APIs 101: overview and use cases
Christina Harlow, Library Data Specialist;Jonathan Hartmann, Georgetown Univ Medical Center; Robert Phillips, Univ of Florida

https://zenodo.org/

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Slides | Research data literacy and the library from Library_Connect

 The era of e-science demands new skill sets and competencies of researchers to ensure their work is accessible, discoverable and reusable. Librarians are naturally positioned to assist in this education as part of their liaison and information literacy services.

Research data literacy and the library

Christian Lauersen, University of Copenhagen; Sarah Wright, Cornell University; Anita de Waard, Elsevier

https://www.brighttalk.com/webcast/9995/226043

Data Literacy: access, assess, manipulate, summarize and present data

Statistical Literacy: think critically about basic stats in everyday media

Information Literacy: think critically about concepts; read, interpret, evaluate information

data information literacy: the ability to use, understand and manage data. the skills needed through the whole data life cycle.

Shield, Milo. “Information literacy, statistical literacy and data literacy.” I ASSIST Quarterly 28. 2/3 (2004): 6-11.

Carlson, J., Fosmire, M., Miller, C. C., & Nelson, M. S. (2011). Determining data information literacy needs: A study of students and research faculty. Portal: Libraries & the Academy, 11(2), 629-657.

data information literacy needs

embedded librarianship,

Courses developed: NTRESS 6600 research data management seminar. six sessions, one-credit mini course

http://guides.library.cornell.edu/ntres6600
BIOG 3020: Seminar in Research skills for biologists; one-credit semester long for undergrads. data management organization http://guides.library.cornell.edu/BIOG3020

lessons learned:

  • lack of formal training for students working with data.
  • faculty assumed that students have or should have acquired the competencies earlier
  • students were considered lacking in these competencies
  • the competencies were almost universally considered important by students and faculty interviewed

http://www.datainfolit.org/

http://www.thepress.purdue.edu/titles/format/9781612493527

ideas behind data information literacy, such as the twelve data competencies.

http://blogs.lib.purdue.edu/dil/the-twelve-dil-competencies/

http://blogs.lib.purdue.edu/dil/what-is-data-information-literacy/

Johnston, L., & Carlson, J. (2015). Data Information Literacy : Librarians, Data and the Education of a New Generation of Researchers. Ashland: Purdue University Press.  http://login.libproxy.stcloudstate.edu/login?qurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ebscohost.com%2flogin.aspx%3fdirect%3dtrue%26db%3dnlebk%26AN%3d987172%26site%3dehost-live%26scope%3dsite

NEW ROLESFOR LIbRARIANS: DATAMANAgEMENTAND CURATION

the capacity to manage and curate research data has not kept pace with the ability to produce them (Hey & Hey, 2006). In recognition of this gap, the NSF and other funding agencies are now mandating that every grant proposal must include a DMP (NSF, 2010). These mandates highlight the benefits of producing well-described data that can be shared, understood, and reused by oth-ers, but they generally offer little in the way of guidance or instruction on how to address the inherent issues and challenges researchers face in complying. Even with increasing expecta-tions from funding agencies and research com-munities, such as the announcement by the White House for all federal funding agencies to better share research data (Holdren, 2013), the lack of data curation services tailored for the “small sciences,” the single investigators or small labs that typically comprise science prac-tice at universities, has been identified as a bar-rier in making research data more widely avail-able (Cragin, Palmer, Carlson, & Witt, 2010).Academic libraries, which support the re-search and teaching activities of their home institutions, are recognizing the need to de-velop services and resources in support of the evolving demands of the information age. The curation of research data is an area that librar-ians are well suited to address, and a num-ber of academic libraries are taking action to build capacity in this area (Soehner, Steeves, & Ward, 2010)

REIMAgININg AN ExISTINg ROLEOF LIbRARIANS: TEAChINg INFORMATION LITERACY SkILLS

By combining the use-based standards of information literacy with skill development across the whole data life cycle, we sought to support the practices of science by develop-ing a DIL curriculum and providing training for higher education students and research-ers. We increased ca-pacity and enabled comparative work by involving several insti-tutions in developing instruction in DIL. Finally, we grounded the instruction in the real-world needs as articu-lated by active researchers and their students from a variety of fields

Chapter 1 The development of the 12 DIL competencies is explained, and a brief compari-son is performed between DIL and information literacy, as defined by the 2000 ACRL standards.

chapter 2 thinking and approaches toward engaging researchers and students with the 12 competencies, a re-view of the literature on a variety of educational approaches to teaching data management and curation to students, and an articulation of our key assumptions in forming the DIL project.

Chapter 3 Journal of Digital Curation. http://www.ijdc.net/

http://www.dcc.ac.uk/digital-curation

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2017/10/19/digital-curation-2/

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2016/12/06/digital-curation/

chapter 4 because these lon-gitudinal data cannot be reproduced, acquiring the skills necessary to work with databases and to handle data entry was described as essential. Interventions took place in a classroom set-ting through a spring 2013 semester one-credit course entitled Managing Data to Facilitate Your Research taught by this DIL team.

chapter 5 embedded librar-ian approach of working with the teaching as-sistants (TAs) to develop tools and resources to teach undergraduate students data management skills as a part of their EPICS experience.
Lack of organization and documentation presents a bar-rier to (a) successfully transferring code to new students who will continue its development, (b) delivering code and other project outputs to the community client, and (c) the center ad-ministration’s ability to understand and evalu-ate the impact on student learning.
skill sessions to deliver instruction to team lead-ers, crafted a rubric for measuring the quality of documenting code and other data, served as critics in student design reviews, and attended student lab sessions to observe and consult on student work

chapter 6 Although the faculty researcher had created formal policies on data management practices for his lab, this case study demonstrated that students’ adherence to these guidelines was limited at best. Similar patterns arose in discus-sions concerning the quality of metadata. This case study addressed a situation in which stu-dents are at least somewhat aware of the need to manage their data;

chapter 7 University of Minnesota team to design and implement a hybrid course to teach DIL com-petencies to graduate students in civil engi-neering.
stu-dents’ abilities to understand and track issues affecting the quality of the data, the transfer of data from their custody to the custody of the lab upon graduation, and the steps neces-sary to maintain the value and utility of the data over time.

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more on Scopus in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=scopus

library website content strategy

Developing a Website Content Strategy

Instructor: Shoshana Mayden, Dates: July 3-28, 2017
http://libraryjuiceacademy.com/049-content-strategy.php

Shoshana Mayden is a content strategist with the University of Arizona Libraries in Tucson, Arizona. She advises on issues related to website content and contributes to developing a content strategy across multiple channels for the library. She works with content managers and library stakeholders to re-write, re-think and re-organize content for the main library website, as well as develop workflows related to the lifecycle of content. She also a copy editor for Weave: the Journal of Library User Experience.

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Information Architecture: Designing Navigation for Library Websites

Instructor: Laura-Edythe Coleman

http://libraryjuiceacademy.com/046-designing-navigation.php

Information Architecture is an essential component of user-centered design of information spaces, especially websites. Website navigation is a key design device to help users search and browse library websites and information systems. The design of Website navigation can be simple or complex, flat or deep. In all cases, website navigation should take into account information architecture (IA) best practices, common user tasks in the library domain, user research, analytics and information seeking models.

Laura-Edythe Coleman is a Museum Informaticist: her focus is on the point of convergence for museums, information, people, and technology. Knowing that societies need museums for creating and sustaining cultural memory, she strives to help communities co-create heritage collections with museums. She holds a PhD in Information Science, a Masters of Library and Information Science and a Bachelors of Fine Arts. She can be reached via Twitter: @lauraedythe, website: http://www.lauraedythe.com, or by email lauraedythecoleman@gmail.com

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Content Strategy for Library Websites from Rebecca Blakiston
http://www.academia.edu/12370418/Content_Strategy_for_Library_Websites 
https://steadfastlibrarian.wordpress.com/2012/06/27/211/
https://connect.library.utoronto.ca/download/attachments/25199917/2013_-__-_DevelopingaContentStrategyforanAcademicLibraryWebs%5Bretrieved-2015-11-17%5D.pdf
https://www.researchgate.net/publication/271758861_Developing_a_Content_Strategy_for_an_Academic_Library_Website
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Other resources: 
http://guiseppegetto.com/ux-content-strategy-library/

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more on Libary web site in this IMS blog
https://www.lib.umich.edu/blog-tags/web-content-strategy
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=library+web+page

instructional design librarian

Conversations With Blended Librarians: The Evolving Instructional Design Librarian now available

Published on

Joelle Pitts is an Instructional Design Librarian and Associate Professor at Kansas State University Libraries. She is responsible for the creation and maintenance of web-based learning objects and environments aimed at improving the information literacy of the Kansas State University community. She leads the New Literacies Alliance, an inter-institutional information literacy consortium. Her research interests include distance education and e-learning theory and design, library user experience (UX), as well as the design and implementation of games-based learning environments.

The view the recorded session visit http://blendedlibrarian.learningtimes.net/

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more on blended librarian in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=blended+librarian

academic institution website

IT #2: 5 ways your college website turns away students (continued)

http://www.ecampusnews.com/it-newsletter/2-college-website-students/

According to the KDG report, prospective students are not only used to reading short bits of information thanks to social media, but many incoming freshman read at a 7th grade level.

“This means your college website must be at the 7th grade level, especially the sections used to attract prospects and to guide them through the application process. No, we’re not kidding,

1. Reading like the New York Times.

2. Requiring Form Fills.

prospective students are often fatigued by long forms that they must complete in order to get the information they need and will quickly leave the website. “Not only will a live chat feature save students time, it can also save your admissions office time answering questions from prospects and applicants

3. Not Understanding What’s Important.

a delicate balance between static and antiquated, and being too interactive. “Don’t get so caught up in the design that there’s a disconnect between what your institution is and marketing gimmicks. You also don’t want super technical, information-filled pages.”

4. Using Fake Images.

images of students posed for the camera won’t do, either. They want to see students, like them, doing the things students do on campus—with exceptions, of course…Candid images, combined with some documentary-style photos from important events on campus, will go a long way toward creating a website that invites visitors to look deeper.
looked at sites like Airbnb.

5. Using Clichéd Statements about Passé Issues

They may read at a 7th grade level, but that doesn’t mean they can’t recognize a cliché.

boasting about unique accomplishments with current relevance for students in a down-to-earth way, such as mentioning a good acceptance rate or a special program for those with learning disabilities. Positive statistics about campus crime rates, successful career counseling efforts or facts about innovative STEM programs are also good talking points.

For more information on the KDG report and blog synopsis, click here.

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more on university web pages in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2016/03/22/university-web-page/

learning space design

An Open Repository of Learning Space Design

The cross-institutional FLEXspace team created a global forum for sharing examples of technology-enhanced learning environments and their impact on teaching and learning.

By Meg Lloyd 10/12/16

https://campustechnology.com/articles/2016/10/12/an-open-repository-of-learning-space-design.aspx

The Flexible Learning Environments eXchange (FLEXspace) a highly searchable, peer-reviewed repository of technology-enhanced learning spaces, freely available to the higher ed community.

FLEXspace uses the Artstor Shared Shelf platform to create its open education resource and share it with the higher education community.

A user begins by accessing the public facing FLEXspace website, which describes each project.

Ultimately, FLEXspace, used in conjunction with other resources like the Learning Space Rating System, will not only promote understanding of other institutions’ efforts, but also assist individual campus stakeholders in creating master learning space plans.

 

 

 

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more on learning spaces in this IMS blog

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=learning+space

tech curriculum design

Dell and Microsoft sponsored.

Register for this complimentary webcast on July 19th to learn how your school or district can design a tech curriculum that matches the future needs of your students today.

During this interactive presentation, you’ll hear how Kennewick School District is giving its students a head start with access to modern tech tools they are likely to use in the real world. Find out how the right tech plan can enable innovative teaching and learning at your school.

Join us as Ron Cone, Kennewick School District CIO, shares:

  • How to design a tech curriculum that matches your students’ future career needs
  • Tips for selecting the right tech to support that curriculum
  • Managing the nuts and bolts of deploying and managing that tech
  • Assessing curriculum and student success

Register »

Thank you,

Linda Briggs
Senior Contributing Editor
THE Journal

instructional designers and tech adoption

Survey: Instructional Designers ‘Pivotal’ in Tech Adoption

By Dian Schaffhauser 05/09/16

https://campustechnology.com/articles/2016/05/09/survey-instructional-designers-pivotal-in-tech-adoption.aspx

Managing projects is the most common task instructional designers undertake during their days, followed by technology and pedagogical training. Their biggest obstacle to success on the job is faculty resistance. The most important expertise they possess as a whole is the ability to learn new technologies, followed by project management and learning science or theory. Their favorite tools to work with are Camtasia and Adobe products; their least-favorite are Blackboard and learning management systems in general.

  • Consider adding more resources in the area of instructional design. If that isn’t possible, at least consider involving instructional designers “early” and “often” during technology transitions.”
  • “Incentivize” faculty to work with instructional designers “from the get-go” in order to help them learn how to engage with their students and expand class time through the use of online tools.
  • Technology providers should work closely with instructional designers in the selection of digital tools.

The report, “Instructional Design in Higher Education,” is freely available on the Intentional Futures website here.

Instructional Design in Higher Education

http://intentionalfutures.com/reports/instructional_design/

p. 4 Graph: median number of instructional designers by type of institution. According to the graph, SCSU must have between 3 and 16 instructional designers.

p. 10.“While a ‘jack-of-all-trades’ can get by in instructional design, the best instructional designers are ‘aces-of-many-trades’,with authentic experience and training in all aspects of the process.”

p. 12“Management choose[s] tools that are cheap and never ask[s] about integration or accessibility.Then we spend enormous amounts of time trying to get them to work.”

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more in this IMS blog on instructional design

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=instructional

Re-conceptualizing Librarianship as a Design Discipline

Re-conceptualizing Librarianship as a Design Discipline

From ‘Design Thinking’ to ‘Design Knowing’

https://goo.gl/yLrG8l

Rachel Ivy Clarke, Ph.D. (@archivy) discussed the theoretical underpinnings that distinguish design knowledge from scientific knowledge and how it is relevant to research, teaching and practice in librarianship.

Recent years have seen an upsurge of interest in applying “design thinking” to library work, but librarianship also aligns with “design knowing”—foundations of knowledge in design that differentiate it from science.

The Blended Librarians Online Community for the webcast of the session

problem solving – who is doing and how.
how the problem is framed. e.g. is the classification system for the librarians or for the students. or both; a wicked problem

design is not an end product, but an ongoing
iteration. a procedure in which repetition of a sequence of operations yields results successively closer to a desired result
and reflection
in design, reflection is going throughout the entire process.

repertoire is the accumulation but not acknowledged.

rationale – why; critique, constructive, so what – research and education and practice

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