Searching for "writing"

handwriting to text

OneNote
OneNote is the obvious choice for anyone who is using a Microsoft Surface or other Windows-based tablet. It is also available to use on iPads and on Android tablets. The option to have handwriting converted to text is an outstanding feature.

Google Keep
If you’re a G Suite for Education user, Google Keep. It doesn’t have the handwriting-to-text function that OneNote offers.

Zoho Notebook
Zoho Notebook doesn’t have the name recognition of OneNote or Keep. Zoho Notebook has the most intuitive design or organization options of the three digital notebooks featured here.

The downside to Zoho Notebook is that the handwriting option only appears on the Android and iOS platforms. If the handwriting option worked in the Chrome or Edge web browsers,

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more on screencasting lecturecapture in this iMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=touch+screen

writing and publishing

Writing is an Art; Publishing is a Business

Peter DeHaan

https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/writing-art-publishing-business-peter-dehaan/

Writing is an Art; Publishing is a Business

Many writers also struggle with the business side of their art. And while I am closer to connecting the two, my struggle is no less real.

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more on OER in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=oer

AI tracks students writings

Schools are using AI to track what students write on their computers

By Simone Stolzoff August 19, 2018
50 million k-12 students in the US
Under the Children’s Internet Protection Act (CIPA), any US school that receives federal funding is required to have an internet-safety policy. As school-issued tablets and Chromebook laptops become more commonplace, schools must install technological guardrails to keep their students safe. For some, this simply means blocking inappropriate websites. Others, however, have turned to software companies like GaggleSecurly, and GoGuardian to surface potentially worrisome communications to school administrators
In an age of mass school-shootings and increased student suicides, SMPs Safety Management Platforms can play a vital role in preventing harm before it happens. Each of these companies has case studies where an intercepted message helped save lives.
Over 50% of teachers say their schools are one-to-one (the industry term for assigning every student a device of their own), according to a 2017 survey from Freckle Education
But even in an age of student suicides and school shootings, when do security precautions start to infringe on students’ freedoms?
When the Gaggle algorithm surfaces a word or phrase that may be of concern—like a mention of drugs or signs of cyberbullying—the “incident” gets sent to human reviewers before being passed on to the school. Using AI, the software is able to process thousands of student tweets, posts, and status updates to look for signs of harm.
SMPs help normalize surveillance from a young age. In the wake of the Cambridge Analytica scandal at Facebook and other recent data breaches from companies like Equifax, we have the opportunity to teach kids the importance of protecting their online data
in an age of increased school violence, bullying, and depression, schools have an obligation to protect their students. But the protection of kids’ personal information is also a matter of their safety

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more on cybersecurity in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=cybersecurity

more on surveillance  in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=surveillance

more on privacy in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=privacy

opinion persuasive argumentative writing

Argumentative v. Persuasive Writing

The adoption of college and career-ready standards has included an addition of argumentative writing at all grade levels. Interpreting expectations among the types of argument (e.g., opinion, persuasive, argument, etc.) can be difficult. Begin first by outlining the subtle, but significant differences among them. Download a chart that defines each and their purposes, techniques, components, etc

Op_v_Pers_v_Arg-zd11ig

writing first draft

Writing the First Draft: The No-Nonsense Guide for Authors

  • I go to a quiet room, office, library or coffee shop.
  • Depending on where I am, I brew/order a cup of coffee.
  • I disconnect my computer from the internet.
  • I put my phone in airplane mode.
  • I open up Scrivener.
  • I arrange the outline for the chapter in question.
  • I set a timer for 30 minutes.
  • I write, keep my fingers moving and avoid stopping to edit myself (this is harder than it sounds).
  • When the buzzer sounds, I stand up and take a two-minute break.
  • After this break, I review my outline and notes.

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25 Things About Writing

by Justin McLachlan  http://www.justinmclachlan.com/1670/25-things-writing/

also in: http://pin.it/HwXSc4n

  • Real writing is actually a lot of rewriting.
  • Your friends won’t be as impressed the second time around. Don’t let it stop you.
  • Grammar, punctuation, spelling — it’s okay if all these things come last.
  • First drafts universally suck.
  • Avoid the advice of those who tell you otherwise of #5.
  • Trying to edit while writing is like trying to chop down a tree while you’re climbing it
  • Writing can be lonely. Very, very lonely.
  • Inspiration will never strike when you need it to. Just write. Do the work.
  • Complex construction doesn’t equal complex though. Simplify.
  • Deadlines. Goals. Set them, and stick to them.

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more on proofreading in this IMS blog
https://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=proofreading
more proofreading techniques for the EDAD doctoral cohort on Pinterest
https://www.pinterest.com/aidedza/doctoral-cohort/

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