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DGBL in higher ed

Digital Game-Based Learning in Higher Ed Moves Beyond the Hype

By George Lorenzo     Aug 4, 2016

https://www.edsurge.com/news/2016-08-04-digital-game-based-learning-in-higher-ed-moves-beyond-the-hype

Toolwire and Muzzy Lane, two digital game-based learning (DGBL) vendors that are making significant strides in higher education through their “serious game” products. The state of DGBL in higher ed is not nearly as prevalent and accepted as it is in K-12, but growing quickly.

Serious games feature evidenced-centered design, whereby data is collected, analyzed and adapted to the knowledge level of the player

Andy Phelps, director of the Rochester Institute of Technology Center for Media, Arts, Games, Interaction and Creativity (MAGIC) and executive committee member of the Higher Education Video Game Alliance (HEVGA),adds that “game-based learning has the opportunity to really challenge our assumptions about linear modes of educational interaction.”

Muzzy Lane, s higher-education-oriented Practice Series games, in partnership with McGraw Hill, feature titles in Marketing, Spanish, Medical Office and Operations.

The Challenge of Creating Worthy GamesBoth Toolwire and Muzzy Lane DGBL products are not of the “Triple A” PlayStation 4 and Xbox One variety, meaning they do not have all the high-fidelity, digital-media bells and whistles that are inside the heavily advertised war games and sports games geared toward the more than $99 billion global video game consumer marketplace, according to gaming market intelligence company Newzoo.

the state of DGBL in higher education consists of very effective digital games of less-than-Triple A fidelity coming out of private companies like Toolwire and Muzzy Lane, as well as from a good number of college and university game design innovation centers similar to RIT’s MAGIC. These include the Games+Learning+Society (GLS) Center at the University of Wisconsin-Madison; the University of Southern California Interactive Media and Games Division, the Carnegie Mellon University Entertainment Technology Center and the New York University Game Center.

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more on DGBL in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=dgbl

Library Technology Conference 2019

#LTC2019

Intro to XR in Libraries from Plamen Miltenoff

keynote: equitable access to information

keynote spaker

https://sched.co/JAqk
the type of data: wikipedia. the dangers of learning from wikipedia. how individuals can organize mitigate some of these dangers. wikidata, algorithms.
IBM Watson is using wikipedia by algorythms making sense, AI system
youtube videos debunked of conspiracy theories by using wikipedia.

semantic relatedness, Word2Vec
how does algorithms work: large body of unstructured text. picks specific words

lots of AI learns about the world from wikipedia. the neutral point of view policy. WIkipedia asks editors present as proportionally as possible. Wikipedia biases: 1. gender bias (only 20-30 % are women).

conceptnet. debias along different demographic dimensions.

citations analysis gives also an idea about biases. localness of sources cited in spatial articles. structural biases.

geolocation on Twitter by County. predicting the people living in urban areas. FB wants to push more local news.

danger (biases) #3. wikipedia search results vs wkipedia knowledge panel.

collective action against tech: Reddit, boycott for FB and Instagram.

Mechanical Turk https://www.mturk.com/  algorithmic / human intersection

data labor: what the primary resources this companies have. posts, images, reviews etc.

boycott, data strike (data not being available for algorithms in the future). GDPR in EU – all historical data is like the CA Consumer Privacy Act. One can do data strike without data boycott. general vs homogeneous (group with shared identity) boycott.

the wikipedia SPAM policy is obstructing new editors and that hit communities such as women.

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Twitter and Other Social Media: Supporting New Types of Research Materials

https://sched.co/JAWp

Nancy Herther Cody Hennesy

http://z.umn.edu/

twitter librarieshow to access at different levels. methods and methodological concerns. ethical concerns, legal concerns,

tweetdeck for advanced Twitter searches. quoting, likes is relevant, but not enough, sometimes screenshot

engagement option

social listening platforms: crimson hexagon, parsely, sysomos – not yet academic platforms, tools to setup queries and visualization, but difficult to algorythm, the data samples etc. open sources tools (Urbana, Social Media microscope: SMILE (social media intelligence and learning environment) to collect data from twitter, reddit and within the platform they can query Twitter. create trend analysis, sentiment analysis, Voxgov (subscription service: analyzing political social media)

graduate level and faculty research: accessing SM large scale data web scraping & APIs Twitter APIs. Jason script, Python etc. Gnip Firehose API ($) ; Web SCraper Chrome plugin (easy tool, Pyhon and R created); Twint (Twitter scraper)

Facepager (open source) if not Python or R coder. structure and download the data sets.

TAGS archiving google sheets, uses twitter API. anything older 7 days not avaialble, so harvest every week.

social feed manager (GWUniversity) – Justin Litman with Stanford. Install on server but allows much more.

legal concerns: copyright (public info, but not beyond copyrighted). fair use argument is strong, but cannot publish the data. can analyize under fair use. contracts supercede copyright (terms of service/use) licensed data through library.

methods: sampling concerns tufekci, 2014 questions for sm. SM data is a good set for SM, but other fields? not according to her. hashtag studies: self selection bias. twitter as a model organism: over-represnted data in academic studies.

methodological concerns: scope of access – lack of historical data. mechanics of platform and contenxt: retweets are not necessarily endorsements.

ethical concerns. public info – IRB no informed consent. the right to be forgotten. anonymized data is often still traceable.

table discussion: digital humanities, journalism interested, but too narrow. tools are still difficult to find an operate. context of the visuals. how to spread around variety of majors and classes. controversial events more likely to be deleted.

takedowns, lies and corrosion: what is a librarian to do: trolls, takedown,

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Crague Cook, Jay Ray

the pilot process. 2017. 3D printing, approaching and assessing success or failure.  https://collegepilot.wiscweb.wisc.edu/

development kit circulation. familiarity with the Oculus Rift resulted in lesser reservation. Downturn also.

An experience station. clean up free apps.

question: spherical video, video 360.

safety issues: policies? instructional perspective: curating,WI people: user testing. touch controllers more intuitive then xbox controller. Retail Oculus Rift

app Scatchfab. 3modelviewer. obj or sdl file. Medium, Tiltbrush.

College of Liberal Arts at the U has their VR, 3D print set up.
Penn State (Paul, librarian, kiniseology, anatomy programs), Information Science and Technology. immersive experiences lab for video 360.

CALIPHA part of it is xrlibraries. libraries equal education. content provider LifeLiqe STEM library of AR and VR objects. https://www.lifeliqe.com/

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Access for All:

https://sched.co/JAXn

accessibilityLeah Root

bloat code (e.g. cleaning up MS Word code)

ILLiad Doctype and Language declaration helps people with disabilities.

https://24ways.org/

 

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A Seat at the Table: Embedding the Library in Curriculum Development

https://sched.co/JAY5

embedded librarianembed library resources.

libraians, IT staff, IDs. help faculty with course design, primarily online, master courses. Concordia is GROWING, mostly because of online students.

solve issues (putting down fires, such as “gradebook” on BB). Librarians : research and resources experts. Librarians helping with LMS. Broadening definition of Library as support hub.

digital access to nonprint collections

Digital Access to Non-Print Collections

University libraries have held collections of books and printed material throughout their existence and continue to be perceived as repositories for physical collections.  Other non-print specialized collections of interest have been held in various departments on campus such as Anthropology, Art, and Biology due to the unique needs of the collections and their usage.  With the advent of electronic media, it becomes possible to store these non-print collections in a central place, such as the Libray.

The skills needed to curate artifacts from an archeological excavation, biological specimens from various life forms, and sculpture work are very different, making it difficult for smaller university libraries to properly hold, curate, and make available such collections.  In addition, faculty in the various departments tend to want those collections near their coursework and research, so it can be readily available to students and researchers. With the expansion of online learning, the need for such availability becomes increasingly pronounced.

With the advent of 3 dimensional (3D) scanners, it has become possible for a smaller library to hold digital representations of these collections in an archive that can be curated from the various departments by experts in the discipline.  The Library can then make the digital representations available to other researchers, students, and the public through kiosks in the Library or via the Internet.  Current methods to scan and store an artifact in 3Dstill require expertise not often found in a Library.

We propose to use existing technology to build an easy-to-use system to scan smaller artifacts in 3D.  The project will include purchase and installation of a workstation in the Library where the artifact collection can be accessed using a large touch-screen monitor, and a portable, easy-to-use 3D scanning station.  Curators of collections from various departments on the St. Cloud State University campus can check out the scanning station, connect to power and Internet where the collection is located, and scan their collection into the libraries digital archives, making the collection easily available to students, other researchers and the public.

The project would include assembly of two workstations previously mentioned and potentially develop the robotic scanner.  Software would be produced to automate the workflow from the scanner to archiving the digital representation and then make the collection available on the Internet.

This project would be a collaboration between the St. Cloud State University Library (https://www.stcloudstate.edu/library/  and  Visualization Laboratory (https://www.facebook.com/SCSUVizLab/). The project would use the expertise and services of the St. Cloud State Visualization Laboratory.  Dr. Plamen Miltenoff, a faculty with the Library will coordinate the Library initiatives related to the use of the 3D scanner. Mark Gill, Visualization Engineer, and Dr. Mark Petzold, Associate Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering will lead a group of students in developing the software to automate the scanning, storage, and retrieval of the 3D models.  The Visualization Lab has already had success in 3D scanning objects for other departments and in creating interactive displays allowing retrieval of various digital content, including 3D scanned objects such animal skulls and video. A collaboration between the Library, VizLab and the Center for Teaching and Learning (, https://www.stcloudstate.edu/teaching/) will enable campus faculty to overcome technical and financial obstacles. It will promote the VizLab across campus, while sharing its technical resources with the Library and making those resources widely available across campus. Such work across silos will expose the necessity (if any) of standardization and will help faculty embrace stronger collaborative practices as well as spur the process of reproduction of best practices across disciplines.

Budget:

Hardware Cost
42” Touch Screen Monitor $2200
Monitor Mount $400
2 Computer Workstations $5000
Installation $500
Cart for Mobile 3D Scanner $1000
3D Scanner (either purchase or develop in-house) $2000
Total $11100

 

The budget covers two computer workstations.  One will be installed in the library as a way to access the digital catalog, and will include a 42 inch touch screen monitor mounted to a wall or stand.  This installation will provide students a way to interact with the models in a more natural way.  The second workstation would be mounted on a mobile cart and connected to the 3D scanner.  This would allow collection curators from different parts of campus to check out the scanner and scan their collections.  The ability to bring the scanner to the collection would increase the likelihood  the collections to be scanned into the library collection.

The 3D scanner would either be purchased off-the shelf or designed by a student team from the Engineering Department.  A solution will be sought to use and minimize the amount of training the operator would need.  If the scanner is developed in-house, a simple optical scanner such as an XBox Kinect device and a turntable or robotic arm will be used.  Support for the XBox Kinect is built into Microsoft Visual Studio, thus creating the interface efficient and costeffective.

Timeline

Task Start Time End Time
Catalog Software October 2017 December 2017
Scanner Interface October 2017 March 2018
Web Interface January 2018 May 2018
System Installation March 2018 May 2018

Personnel

Plamen Miltenoff, Ph.D., MLIS

pmiltenoff@stcloudstate.edu

320-308-3072

Dr. Miltenoff is part of a workgroup within the academic library, which works with faculty, students and staff on the application of new technologies in education. Dr. Miltenoff’s most recent research with Mark Gill is on the impact of Video 360 on students during library orientation: http://web.stcloudstate.edu/pmiltenoff/bi/

 

Mark Petzold, Ph.D.
mcpetzold@stcloudstate.edu
320-308-4182
Dr. Petzold is an Associate Professor in Electrical and Computer Engineering.  His current projects involve visualization of meteorological data in a virtual reality environment and research into student retention issues.  He is co-PI on a $5 million NSF S-STEM grant which gives scholarships to low income students and investigates issues around student transitions to college.

Mark Gill

mcgill@stcloudstate.edu

320-308-5605

Mr. Gill is a Visualization Engineer for the College of Science and Engineering and runs the Visualization Laboratory.  He has worked for several major universities as well as Stennis Space Center and Mechdyne, Inc.  He holds a Masters of Science in Software Engineering.

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University of Nevada, Reno and Pennsylvania State University 41 campus libraries to include collaborative spaces where faculty and students gather to transform virtual ideas into reality.

Maker Commons in the Modern Library: Six Reasons 3D Printers Should be in Your School’s Library

Maker Commons in the Modern Library 6 REASONS 3D PRINTERS SHOULD BE IN YOUR LIBRARY

1. Librarians Know How to Share 2. Librarians Work Well with IT People 3. Librarians Serve Everybody 4. Librarians Can Fill Learning Gaps 5. Librarians like Student Workers 6. Librarians are Cross-Discipline

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more on grants in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=grant

death of game consoles

The death of game consoles is upon us

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=consoles

game consoles

Microsoft kills off Xbox 360 after more than a decade

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/technology/2016/04/21/microsoft-kills-off-xbox-360-after-more-than-a-decade/

more about game consoles in this IMS blog:
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=xbox

virtual reality


game consoles in the library

game consoles in the library

from the LITA listserv:

Hi LITA,

Do any of you have game consoles in your libraries?

We currently offer PS3 and xBox but recognize there’s a whole new generation available.

Our issue is that xBox1 works best connected to the Internet.  This allows full game play but opens up some issues in a library environment.  Is anyone already offering these?  How do you deal with patrons logging into their personal accounts on the consoles and perhaps forgetting to log our therefore leaving them exposed?  These accounts store credit card info and game winnings.  What’s a library to do?

Thank you,
Madeleine Sturmer
IT Manager

Teton County Library
(307) 733-2164 x143
IT Dept  x192

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College Gamers Battle for Scholarships

By Dian Schaffhauser 04/04/16

https://campustechnology.com/articles/2016/04/04/college-gamers-battle-for-scholarships.aspx

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More about games and gamification in the library in this IMS blog:
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/?s=games&submit=Search