Is Europe a sanctuary

The EU’s new plans for a border force of 10,000 guards yet again shows its unwillingness to defend the fundamental rights of refugees.

Posted by Le Monde diplomatique in English on Monday, September 10, 2018

https://mondediplo.com/2017/05/21Europe

Far right and Germany

Anti-Immigrant Protest Turns Violent In Eastern German City Of Chemnitz

August 28, 2018 2:32 AM ET

https://www.npr.org/2018/08/28/642478937/anti-immigrant-protest-turns-violent-in-eastern-german-city-of-chemnitz

https://www.dw.com/en/violence-in-chemnitz-as-leftist-and-far-right-protesters-clash/a-45250620

http://www.spiegel.de/international/germany/chemnitz-right-wing-riots-enter-second-day-a-1225321.html

Silvia Faschner (her name has been changed by the editors) is standing off to the side. The 64-year-old undertaker has come with her son, who works as an elderly care nurse. She points over to the other side where a group has gathered to protest right-wing extremists in Chemnitz. And where a handful of young men from Syria have assembled under a tree.

Furious at the Federal Government

Faschner points to the Syrians and says: “I just don’t want so many foreigners coming. When I look over there, I wonder why my tax money is spent on them. They just want to be professional football players or singers, but if they actually have to do a bit of hard work, they complain that their back hurts!”

She doesn’t know the exact numbers. But according to statistics reported by the local Chemnitz newspaper Freie Presse, foreigners made up only 7.6 percent of the city’s population at the beginning of 2018, while the share of refugees was just 2.41 percent. The newspaper cited statistics compiled by Chemnitz City Hall.

http://time.com/5379861/germany-far-right-protest-chemnitz-murder/

http://time.com/01f8bb53-31f0-4b83-9b67-1787906ce1ac

 

In 1991, shortly after the fall of the Berlin Wall, a group of 500 neo-Nazis attacked buildings housing refugees in Hoyerswerda, northeast of Chemnitz. Since then, there have been far-right attacks against minority groups in Leipzig, and Freital, also in Saxony. The state capital, Dresden, is the birthplace of the anti-Muslim, nationalist movement Pegida, a German acronym for a title that translates roughly as Patriotic Europeans Against the Islamization of the West.

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-germany-chemnitz/german-government-condemns-far-right-demo-in-eastern-city-after-fatal-dispute-idUSKCN1LC1DD

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-45320382

German Far-Right and Counterprotesters Clash in Chemnitz

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Russian Times

https://www.rt.com/news/436949-chemnitz-protests-police-scuffles/

https://www.aljazeera.com/news/2018/08/anti-fascists-clash-east-german-town-chemnitz-180828060442094.html

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https://www.breitbart.com/london/2018/08/28/1000-citizens-german-city-riot-streets-following-fatal-stabbing-migrant/

https://www.theblaze.com/news/2016/10/08/police-in-eastern-german-city-of-chemnitz-conduct-major-raid-after-receiving-intel-of-possible-bombing-attack

https://townhall.com/news/world/2018/08/27/german-police-brace-for-rival-protests-after-man-killed-n2513318

https://mediaautoresponder.com/2018/08/28/germany-chemnitz-residents-react-to-violent-anti-immigration-protests/

More here:

library spot fake news

Spain Becomes New Target for Migrants

Spain Becomes New Target for Migrants

Although the number of migrants making their way across the Mediterranean to Europe has fallen drastically, the preferred overseas route has now moved westward to the strait between Morocco and Spain. Now Rome, Madrid and North African countries are battling to find a solution.

http://www.spiegel.de/international/world/refugees-now-aim-for-spain-in-their-migration-route-a-1221537.html#ref=rss

Across the strait, in Spain, the consequences are coming into view: Last Saturday, on the beach at Zahora, near Cape Trafalgar, about 50 refugees sprinted among the nearly naked swimmers and nudists as their wooden boat reached the coast. There was an uproar on the beach and some of the vacationers filmed the scene. The images, which were posted on the internet soon after, show the collision between two worlds.

Melilla

Europe's most fortified border is in Africa

On a wedge of land at the northern tip of the African continent lies a little piece of Europe. The city of Melilla is one of two Spanish enclaves in Morocco, a gateway to Europe in North Africa, and as such – it is one of the most heavily fortified borders in the world. Johnny Harris traveled to this corner of the world to report on the African migrants who try to make the dangerous crossing over the border and into Europe. And the political climate that seeks to keep them on the other side of the fence.

Posted by Vox on Tuesday, December 5, 2017

Nationalism and Migration

Gisy: „1% der Menschheit besitzt mehr als die übrigen 99%”

„1% der Menschheit besitzt mehr als die übrigen 99%”: Gregor Gysi, Präsident der „Europäischen Linken”, sieht Ungleichheit als zentrales Problem. Er übt scharfe Kritik an Nationalisten, „die immer auf die schwächsten Migranten draufhauen”:

Posted by Zeit im Bild on Monday, March 26, 2018

Orban Hungary immigrants

What Orbán’s Third Win Could Mean for Europe

With his strong election victory on Sunday, Hungary’s Viktor Orbán exceeded all expectations. What will the party’s third win mean for Europe?

In an extremely divisive campaign, Orbán essentially focused on one single issule, warning against Hungary’s “downfall” at the hands of “immigrants.”
cheering supporters, who could be heard shouting a chant usually associated with right-wing extremists or radical football fans: “Ria, ria, Hungaria.”
Everyone in Hungary knows that he’s corrupt and that he governs poorly, and yet many people still vote for him because they consider it important that he protects them from immigrants and minorities like the Roma.

Don cossacks

Cossacks’ faith as identity

It’s about Russia, not God

The Russian Orthodox Church, which sees the Kiev patriarchate as a rival, cannot afford to alienate the 75% of the Ukrainian population who remain faithful to it: this is one of the few cases in which Moscow has not been able to count on the support of the Church.

Most Cossacks approve of the synergy between Church and state, which normally runs smoothly. But a few see it as a sign that the lessons of the past have been forgotten, something close to a betrayal. One young man showed me photographs of his great-great-grandparents, who were killed or died in exile after the Soviet authorities deported them in the 1920s.

Alexey Lebedev, a Cossack and priest of the Russian Orthodox Autonomous Church, was just as angry: ‘When someone tells you that anyone who believes in Orthodoxy has a duty to defend the state, he is repeating the religious line dictated by Vladimir Putin. Patriarch Kirill’s Church isn’t really a religious organisation, it’s just a department of the Kremlin in charge of Orthodox affairs.’