The Curse of “Helicopter Teaching”

The Curse of “Helicopter Teaching” is a wonderful article by Penny Kittle and Kelly Gallagher about why too much guidance impedes student learning, and why empowering students prepare themselves for later challenges.

Penny Kittle teaches freshman composition at Plymouth State University in New Hampshire. She is the author of many books on reading and writing, including Write Beside Them and Book Love (Heinemann, 2008 and 2012) and president of the Book Love Foundation. Kelly Gallagher teaches English language arts at Magnolia High school in Anaheim, California. He is author of many books, including Write Like This and In the Best Interests of Students (Stenhouse, 2011 and 2015). They are coauthors of 180 Days (Heinemann, 2018).

Here’s the link for the article:

http://www.ascd.org/publications/educational-leadership/mar20/vol77/num06/The-Curse-of-%C2%A3Helicopter-Teaching%C2%A3.aspx

 

Special education is Broken

Is special education really broken? If yes, how is it broken and why?

The following article-link by Christina A. Samuels is a good read about the problems and challenges in SPED. Christina Samuels is an associate editor for Education Week covering educational equity and opportunity to learn.

https://www.edweek.org/ew/articles/2019/01/09/special-education-is-broken.html#top

 

The Strength of a Teacher-Principal Partnership

The article “The Strength of a Teacher-Principal Partnership” by Jodi Zeis is a good read about teachers’ relationships with their administrators and its impact on both teachers’ and principals’ retention.

Jodi Zeis currently teaches pre-service teachers at Francis Marion University in South Carolina. She previously taught every K-12 grade level in general and special education classrooms and served as an administrator for five years.

http://www.ascd.org/ascd-express/vol15/num09/the-strength-of-a-teacher-principal-partnership.aspx?utm_source=ascdexpress&utm_medium=email&utm_term=Principals&utm_campaign=1509

 

Born to Win, Schooled to Lose

“The American Dream promises that individual talent will be rewarded, regardless of where one comes from or who one’s parents are. But the reality of what transpires along America’s K-12-to-career pipeline reveals a sorting of America’s most talented youth by affluence—not merit. Among the affluent, a kindergartner with test scores in the bottom half has a 7 in 10 chance of reaching high SES among his or her peers as a young adult, while a disadvantaged kindergartner with top-half test scores only has a 3 in 10 chance.” – an article from Georgetown University.

https://cew.georgetown.edu/cew-reports/schooled2lose/

 

You Can’t Have a Coaching Culture Without a Structure

Elena Aguilar in her article “You can’t have a coaching culture without a structure” proposes school leaders that building an effective structure with 10 key elements is essential for successful coaching programs. This article is a must read for school leaders who are committed to coaching for positive impact.

Elena Aguilar is president of Bright Morning Consulting, a sought-after speaker and presenter, and author of many books, including The Art of Coaching (Jossey-Bass, 2013).

http://www.ascd.org/publications/educational-leadership/nov19/vol77/num03/You-Can’t-Have-a-Coaching-Culture-Without-a-Structure.aspx

 

For School Leaders, a Time of Vigilance and Caring

This article by John Rogers is a good read about the principals’ concern about gun violence and its impact on students and students learning. It also discusses the principals’ response to the threat and the measures they are taking to address it. Please click the link below to read the article.

http://www.ascd.org/publications/educational-leadership/oct19/vol77/num02/For-School-Leaders,-a-Time-of-Vigilance-and-Caring.aspx

John Rogers is a professor of education at UCLA. He directs UCLA’s Institute for Democracy, Education, and Access and serves as faculty director of Center X, which houses UCLA’s Teacher Education and Principal Leadership Programs.

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