MnSCU Mediaspace AKA Kaltura

Getting Started with MediaSpace v5 (PDF attachment)

From: Todd Digby <>
Date: Thursday, October 31, 2013 10:52 AM
To: Todd Digby <>
Subject: MnSCU Mediaspace Update – New Version – New URL

Hello MnSCU Mediaspace user,

We have upgraded MediaSpace systems and now have a new permanent address for MnSCU MediaSpace

You will also see that there have been some changes to this version from the previous version.   Just use your StarID to login, all you existing videos will be available in the site.  There are a few new features in this version of Mediaspace.    I have also updated the getting started document that I originally distributed to make adjustments for the new version.  Once we are confident that you have made the transition to the new version, we will start broadening the use to other campuses and to faculty / staff use.  Expect more announcements to come over the next couple weeks.

New Features

Direct links to videos can now be used.  The steps to follow

  1. Click on your Video title from your My Media listing
  2. Click on the Action button (below the video player box, to the right)
  3. Select “+ Publish”
  4. Chance the privacy settings to “Unlisted”
  5. Click on the “Share” button
  6. Copy link and send out.

Embedding can use an Iframe or the standard legacy embed.  

  • The embedding feature will now have the necessary security measures in place so that the D2L mixed content issues will not be present.

Downloading a copy of the video

  • You can now download a copy of the video from MediaSpace.  If you are the owner of the video, when you select the “Edit” screen for the video, the player will have a “Download” option in the middle of the screen.  This will allow an MPEG moving file to be downloaded to your workstation.  This is only available in the “Edit” screen player, so only the owner of the video will have the ability to download it from MediaSpace.



Todd R. Digby

System Director of Academic Technology

Minnesota State Colleges and Universities

30 7th St. E., Suite 350 | St. Paul, MN 55101-7804 | 651-201-1812 l 612-803-4922 (cell)  |

Collaborative cloud-based tools to consider, Real-Time Collaboration Tools

5 Free Cloud-Based Document Collaboration Tools to Power Your Productivity

  1. Evernote
    Learn More about Evernote with These Excellent Video Tutorials ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning 
  2. Google Docs
    Kaizena: add audio comments to the  content of your Google documents 
  3. MindMeister (paid, might want to skip it)
  4. Trello
  5. WordPress—collaboration-tools.html#!


Doodle  – Meeting Wizard

Google Drive, formerly known as Google Docs

The 10 best powerPoint Alternatives!

33 Highly Useful Presentation Tools!


20 Options for Real-Time Collaboration Tools

Neat Chat: It is one of the easiest and fastest ways to have online conversations with a group of friends or colleagues. It provides a clean, fast and robust chat room where you can share files, send private messages and even access conversations that happened in your absence.

Today’s Meet: Allows you to have quick conversations in private online chat rooms. It has a back channel which gives you the ability to adjust your audience’s needs and emotions. In your chat room you can use live stream to make comments, ask questions and use that feedback to tailor your presentations to address your audience’s needs

Zoho Writer: Is a powerful rich text-editor for Android devices, which allows you to create documents seamlessly with a rich feature-set. You can either save these docs in local devices or cloud devices like Zoho Docs. Zoho Docs workspace is a collaboration tool, which allows you to share work on the same doc with other people in real-time.

Scriblink: Is a free digital whiteboard that users can share online in real-time. It can be used by up to 5 users at the same time. It can be used just for fun or for more practical things like layout planning, concept diagramming, or tutoring a friend.

Stinto: Is for creating free chats and inviting others to join just by sending a simple link. It allows you to share photos and images with others. You can upload photos, sketches, diagrams, etc. to your chat for others to view.

Mind42: Allows collaborative online mind-mapping and brainstorming. It runs in your browser and allows you to manage your ideas alone or while working in a group. It allows you to quickly create, manage and edit the data structure required for mind maps.

Scribblar: Offers you an online whiteboard, real-time audio, document upload, text-chat and more. It is a perfect online-tutoring platform. You can use it to revise artwork and images; create brainstorming, product demos, interviews and tests.

CoSketch: Is a multi-user online whiteboard designed to give you the ability to quickly visualize and share your ideas as images. Anything you paint is shared in real-time and can be saved and embedded on forums, blogs, etc.

Twiddla: Is a real-time online collaboration tool, which allows text and audio chat in real-time. It also allows you to review websites within the application.

Etherpad: Is an open source online editor providing collaborative editing in real-time. You can write articles, press releases, to-do lists and more along with your friends or colleagues all working on the same doc at the same time.

Tinychat: It lets you create a private chat room in an instant, the URL of which can be emailed to others to participate in real-time. It is very easy to use and also has features to support video capability.

FlashMeeting: Is an easy-to-use online meeting application. A meeting is pre-booked by a registered user and a URL, containing a unique password for the meeting, is returned by the FlashMeeting server, which is passed on to the people who want to participate.

BigMarker: It combines messaging, file sharing and video calls into one place. BigMarker communities have features for conferencing for up to 100 people, presenting PowerPoints and other docs, sharing your screen, recording, storing, exporting sessions and more. Is a web and mobile meeting organizer which brings the benefits of online collaboration to both online and offline meetings. It provides a dedicated online meeting space for scheduling, material sharing and agenda setting.

Conceptboard: It provides instant whiteboards to create a platform for you to communicate with your team. Feedback on visual content is easy and there is support for tasks, reports and more. It simplifies and improves collaboration on visual content and accelerates collaboration processes within your team.

Speek: Allows you to simply organize conference calls. Speek uses a personal or business link instead of a phone number and PIN for conference calls. Participants can join or start a call from their phone, web or mobile browser. You can see who’s joined, who’s talking, share files, use call controls and more.

Draw It Live: Is a free application that allows you to work together with other people to draw in real-time. You can create a whiteboard and share its URL with other people to let them join.

LiveMinutes: Is an online conferencing app. A unique URL address is created for your conference that you can share with people you want to connect with. You can share audio, virtual whiteboards, documents, etc. and a feature to share videos is coming soon.

FlockDraw: Is an online whiteboard based painting and drawing tool. It makes it easy to draw online free with multiple people participation. There can be unlimited people in a room with drawing updates in real-time.

VIDquik: Is a video-conferencing platform where you can connect and talk with anyone you want. You just need to enter the Email of the person you want to call, they click on the link and the two of you are in a web-based video call.


Where andragogy grew out of the term pedagogy, heutagogy was created as an offshoot of andragogy.  We see that in Hase and Kenyon’s 2000 article entitled, “From Andragogy to Heutagogy.” Heutagogy maintains the andragogical learner-centered emphasis, but takes it a step further by also highlighting the importance of develop the skills necessary to learn on one’s own. As such, heutagogy is often described as the study of self-determined or self-directed learning.  It is not just about learning content, but also learning how to learn.  It is an especially relevant approach in the digital age, given the vast amount of content and resources available to anyone with a device and Internet access.

bibliography list of peer-reviewed literature on “flipped classroom”

list of peer reviewed literature on “flipped classroom”

Findlay-Thompson, S., & Mombourquette, P. (2013). EVALUATION OF A FLIPPED CLASSROOM IN AN UNDERGRADUATE BUSINESS COURSE. Global Conference On Business & Finance Proceedings, 8(2), 138-145.

Davies, R., Dean, D., & Ball, N. (2013). Flipping the classroom and instructional technology integration in a college-level information systems spreadsheet course. Educational Technology

Davies, R., Dean, D., & Ball, N. (2013). Flipping the classroom and instructional technology integration in a college-level information systems spreadsheet course. Educational Technology Research & Development, 61(4), 563-580. doi:10.1007/s11423-013-9305-6

Missildine, K., Fountain, R., Summers, L., & Gosselin, K. (2013). Flipping the Classroom to Improve Student Performance and Satisfaction. Journal Of Nursing Education, 52(10), 597-599. doi:10.3928/01484834-20130919-03

Butt, A. (2014). STUDENT VIEWS ON THE USE OF A FLIPPED CLASSROOM APPROACH: EVIDENCE FROM AUSTRALIA. Business Education & Accreditation, 6(1), 33-43.

Strayer, J. F. (2012). How Learning in an Inverted Classroom Influences Cooperation, Innovation and Task Orientation. Learning Environments Research, 15(2), 171-193.

Critz, C. M., & Knight, D. (2013). Using the Flipped Classroom in Graduate Nursing Education. Nurse Educator, 38(5), 210-213. doi:10.1097/NNE.0b013e3182a0e56a

Herreid, C., & Schiller, N. A. (2013). Case Studies and the Flipped Classroom. Journal Of College Science Teaching, 42(5), 62-66.

Jottings by Saquarrah. (2013). Medical Teacher, 35(6), 532-533.

Brunsell, E., & Horejsi, M. (2013). Science 2.0. Science Teacher, 80(2), 8.


“whiteboard screencasting” and “lecture capture” apps: please enter your choices and suggestions

Greg Jorgensen emailed us with his new darling:

Explain Everything –

and raises a very good question:

What do we know and how do we organize our tools and apps for whiteboard screencasting and lecture capture?



Greg’s choice of the day is atop of a list from the Ed Tech/y and Mobile Learning web site:

next on that top-6-list are


Show Me

Educreations Interactive Whiteboard

Doodlecast Pro


Doceri ( is a very promissing app, which Bob Lessinger was pushing to be installed on campuos computers (being free), but it is ONLY iPAD-bound (not even iPHone or iTouch)
In addition to Doceri: Stage : Interactive Whiteboard and Document Camera and Splashtop Whiteboard per: 3 Apps to Turn Your iPad into Interactive Whiteboard ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning

Here is a neat table about the compatibility (iOS and Android) for several of these apps:

Here is another good resource from Alaska. The screencasting apps reviewed are the same as above, but other good sources regarding a pedagogy involving the technology.

A broader approach to this issue (Presentation & Screencasting Apps) on Pinterest:

More apps and possibilities, as well as “how-to” directions here:

Here is an useful blog entry, comparing  ExlpainEverything with Educreation —

More apps:

Lecturnity ( )


a lengthy review is available here:

25 Smart #SocialMedia Tips For #EdLeaders


5 Learning Strategies

  1. Track relevant hashtags on twitter (I use Hootsuite)

  2. Use a reader to scan key blogs (I switched from iGoogle to Ustart & Feedly)

  3. Like causes/companies and track on Facebook

  4. Learn about your audience and growth  (we use Sprout Social and Google Analytics)

  5. Open a doc for good question you receive; use for future blogs

5 Impact Strategies

  1. Blog at least weekly about what you learn

  2. Tweet 5-10/day about what’s catching your attention

  3. Follow people doing good work

  4. Use hashtags/handles when you tweet

  5. Capture contacts in a CRM database for easy sharing

5 Leadership Strategies

  1. Write a weekly staff blast

  2. Publish a weekly community blast

  3. Make contact information available publically

  4. Create multiple points of entry

  5. Create opportunities for discussions and feedback

5 Brand-Building Strategies

  1. Use simple crisp graphics

  2. Create a clean easy to navigate homepage

  3. Add Facebook & Twitter icons to homepage

  4. Blog weekly and make it easy to share

  5. Keep branding between all channels cohesive

5 Survival Strategies

  1. Carve out learning and sharing hour every morning

  2. Don’t obsess the rest of the day

  3. Haters will hate; pick your battles

  4. Clear your inbox twice daily; flag/prioritize follow ups

  5. Turn it all off and go for a walk

Gaming in Higher Education: EDUCAUSE 2013 welcomes Jane McGonigal

The Awesome Power of Gaming in Higher Education

EDUCAUSE 2013 welcomes Jane McGonigal and considers the potential of games in education.

1. Foldit

The University of Washington’s Foldit game enables anyone to contribute to scientific research through virtual protein folding. The university’s game developers posit that human gamers’ propensity to not give up on a gaming task – resiliency – make them much more adept at solving complex protein structure prediction and design than supercomputers. And in some ways, they’ve already proven that to be so. Foldit game participants have been named in several published scientific journal articles, including one that describes how a protein structure could be solved and used in the treatment of HIV.

2. Urgent Evoke

The rich, interactive universe of Grand Theft Auto was the inspiration for this game, developed for The World Bank as a way to teach Sub-Sahara African youths to solve social problems in ways that also could provide a sustainable living. The platform is free and available online and can be used by schools to teach social entrepreneurship. A graphic novel serves as the game’s centerpiece, and players build out their gaming profiles as a comic or graphic novel might retell a superhero’s origin story. Participants complete projects in real life to solve real problems, such as securing a community’s food supply or establishing a sustainable power source, then progress through levels of the game. Those who successfully complete their 10-week missions ultimately earn certification from the World Bank Institute. In 2010, 50 student participants saw their entrepreneurship models funded by the World Bank, including Libraries Across Africa (now Librii), a franchise operating in Ghana.

3. Find the Future: The Game

Not all games must be played out in a virtual space. This game – developed by McGonigal with Natron Baxter and Playmatics – combines real-world missions with virtual clues and online collaboration, resulting in young people working together overnight in the New York Public Library to write and publish a book of personal essays about what they learned.

“The game is designed to empower young people to find their own futures by bringing them face-to-face with the writings and objects of people who made an extraordinary difference.”

Participants spend a night wandering throughout the library’s stacks and research materials, scanning QR codes to prove they found and interacted with the objects of their clues or missions. One 2011 participant, upon discovering the library’s early draft of the Declaration of Independence wrote an essay called a “Declaration of Interdependence.”


More on Jane McGonigal on YouTube: