Archive of ‘announcement’ category

directions immersive learning

Emerging Directions in Immersive Learning

Presented by: Maya Georgieva and Emory Craig, May 17, 1:00 – 2:00pm (EDT)

http://events.shindig.com/event/campus-tech

Digital Bodies cofounders Emory Craig and Maya Georgieva for an interactive session that will examine five developments in virtual, augmented, and mixed reality with the greatest potential to impact teaching and learning.   Ask your questions live as they explore how groundbreaking developments in VR, AR, MR, and artificial intelligence will power immersive technologies and transform learning.

Hololense $3000 and it is difficult to use outside. persistent digital objects
https://mixed.reality.news/news/whats-difference-between-hololens-meta-magic-leap-0171361/

https://events.google.com/io/

https://unity3d.com/sundance2017

education: new media, gaming

storytelling: immersive storytelling and AI

Jeremy Bailenson https://vhil.stanford.edu/

Julie Johnston – https://uits.iu.edu/learning-spaces

digital literacy ala

Rethinking Digital Literacy
facilitated by Paul Signorelli  4-week eCourse Beginning Monday, May 1, 2017

http://www.alastore.ala.org/detail.aspx?ID=11469&zbrandid=4634&zidType=CH&zid=43393326&zsubscriberId=1026665847&zbdom=http://ala-publishing.informz.net

Learning outcomes

After participating in this course, you will be able to:

  • incorporate ever-evolving definitions of digital literacy into learning opportunities
  • draw upon a variety of digital resources to create digital-learning opportunities
  • seek additional resources that you can use in your continuing efforts to keep up with new developments in digital literacy in libraries and other learning organizations

What is digital literacy? Do you know how you can foster digital literacy through formal and informal learning opportunities for your library staff and users?

Supporting digital literacy still remains an important part of library staff members’ work, but sometimes we struggle to agree on a simple, meaningful definition of the term. In this four-week eCourse, training/learning specialist Paul Signorelli will begin by exploring a variety of definitions, focusing on work by a few leading proponents of the need to foster digital literacy among people of all ages and backgrounds. He will explore a variety of digital-literacy resources – including case studies of how we creatively approach digital-literacy learning opportunities for library staff and users, and will explore a variety of digital tools that will help to encourage further understanding of this topic.

Now, who is ready to build their digital-literacy skills and help their users become digitally literate as well?

eCourse Outline

Part 1: Digital Literacy: Initial Definitions and Explorations

Part 2: Digital Literacy: Crap Detection and Other Skills and Tools

  • Exploring Howard Rheingold’s approach to crap detection and other digital literacy/net literacy skills
  • Participation, collaboration, creativity, and experimentation as digital-literacy skills
  • Building our digital-literacy toolkit

Part 3: Digital Literacy in Learning

  • The varying digital literacy needs of our youngest students, of teens, and of adults
  • Exploring various online resources supporting our digital-literacy training-teaching-learning efforts
  • The myth of the digital native

Part 4: Fostering Digital Literacy: Creating Within a Digital Environment

  • Creating a framework to promote digital literacy
  • Designing workshops and other learning opportunities
  • Keeping up in an evolving digital literacy landscape

 

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more on digital literacy in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=digital+literacy

bibliometrics altmetrics

International Benchmarks for Academic Library Use of Bibliometrics & Altmetrics, 2016-17

ID: 3807768 Report August 2016 115 pages Primary Research Group

http://www.researchandmarkets.com/publication/min3qqb/3807768

The report gives detailed data on the use of various bibliometric and altmetric tools such as Google Scholar, Web of Science, Scimago, Plum Analytics

20 predominantly research universities in the USA, continental Europe, the UK, Canada and Australia/New Zealand. Among the survey participants are: Carnegie Mellon, Cambridge University, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya the University at Albany, the University of Melbourne, Florida State University, the University of Alberta and Victoria University of Wellington

– 50% of the institutions sampled help their researchers to obtain a Thomsen/Reuters Researcher ID.

ResearcherID provides a solution to the author ambiguity problem within the scholarly research community. Each member is assigned a unique identifier to enable researchers to manage their publication lists, track their times cited counts and h-index, identify potential collaborators and avoid author misidentification. In addition, your ResearcherID information integrates with the Web of Science and is ORCID compliant, allowing you to claim and showcase your publications from a single one account. Search the registry to find collaborators, review publication lists and explore how research is used around the world!

– Just 5% of those surveyed use Facebook Insights in their altmetrics efforts.

 

 

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more on altmetrics in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=altmetrics

Analytics and Data Mining in Education

https://www.linkedin.com/groups/934617/934617-6255144273688215555

Call For Chapters: Responsible Analytics and Data Mining in Education: Global Perspectives on Quality, Support, and Decision-Making

SUBMIT A 1-2 PAGE CHAPTER PROPOSAL
Deadline – June 1, 2017

Title:  Responsible Analytics and Data Mining in Education: Global Perspectives on Quality, Support, and Decision-Making

Synopsis:
Due to rapid advancements in our ability to collect, process, and analyze massive amounts of data, it is now possible for educators at all levels to gain new insights into how people learn. According to Bainbridge, et. al. (2015), using simple learning analytics models, educators now have the tools to identify, with up to 80% accuracy, which students are at the greatest risk of failure before classes even begin. As we consider the enormous potential of data analytics and data mining in education, we must also recognize a myriad of emerging issues and potential consequences—intentional and unintentional—to implement them responsibly. For example:

· Who collects and controls the data?
· Is it accessible to all stakeholders?
· How are the data being used, and is there a possibility for abuse?
· How do we assess data quality?
· Who determines which data to trust and use?
· What happens when the data analysis yields flawed results?
· How do we ensure due process when data-driven errors are uncovered?
· What policies are in place to address errors?
· Is there a plan for handling data breaches?

This book, published by Routledge Taylor & Francis Group, will provide insights and support for policy makers, administrators, faculty, and IT personnel on issues pertaining the responsible use data analytics and data mining in education.

Important Dates:

· June 1, 2017 – Chapter proposal submission deadline
· July 15, 2017 – Proposal decision notification
· October 15, 2017 – Full chapter submission deadline
· December 1, 2017 – Full chapter decision notification
· January 15, 2018 – Full chapter revisions due
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more on data mining in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=data+mining

more on analytics in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=analytics

mobile apps for libraries

Apps for Librarians: Empower Your Users with Mobile App Literacy eCourse
Nicole Hennig
Item Number: 1541-9076  Publisher: ALA Editions Price: $250.00

http://www.alastore.ala.org/detail.aspx?ID=11270&zbrandid=4634&zidType=CH&zid=42706629&zsubscriberId=1026665847&zbdom=http://ala-publishing.informz.net

Estimated Hours of Learning: 28
Certificate of Completion available upon request

Learning outcomes

After participating in this eCourse, you will:

  • Gain experience using some of the best apps available and understand how they enable learning
  • Learn how to evaluate and review mobile apps
  • Learn how tablets complement laptops, and how their capabilities are creating new learning opportunities
  • Learn how apps are being used by people with special needs, and where to find additional resources for learning more
  • Receive guidance for creating your own app guides, offering workshops, and advising colleagues

In this 5-week eCourse, you’ll learn about the most useful apps available on tablet and mobile devices and how they can be applied in your library to create the best learning experiences for your patrons and students.

Mobile apps are empowering for people of all ages and abilities. Contrary to the popular idea that apps are only useful for “consumption,” the best apps are being used effectively as tools to enable learning and knowledge creation. In this eCourse, Nicole Hennig will show you how to incorporate apps as learning tools at your library.

eCourse Outline

Week 1 – E-Reading

The Apps

  • Book reading
  • Magazine reading
  • Apps for Reading PDFs, web pages, and news feeds
  • Individual book apps

Readings & Discussion

  • Readings about e-reading & future of the book
  • Your thoughts on the readings (discussion forum)
  • Optional app review assignment

Week 2 – Productivity & Writing

The Apps

  • Productivity
    • Cloud storage, passwords, to do lists, notes
    • Handwriting, speech recognition, scanning, barcodes
  • Writing & Presenting
    • Word processing, spreadsheets, slides
    • More presentation apps

Readings & Discussion

  • Readings about security, writing, mobile apps in academia
  • Your thoughts on the readings (discussion forum)
  • Optional app review assignment

Week 3 – Reference

The Apps

  • Dictionaries, encyclopedias
  • Unit converters, maps, languages
  • Specialized reference apps
  • Subscription databases & citations

Readings & Discussion

  • Readings about jailbreaking, platforms, & mobile web
  • Apple’s iOS Human Interface Guidelines
  • Your thoughts on the readings (discussion forum)
  • Optional app review assignment

Week 4 – Multimedia

The Apps

  • Art viewing
  • Art creation
  • Photography and photo editing
  • Music listening
  • Music creation
  • Video viewing and editing

Readings & Discussion

  • Readings about technology & children
  • Your thoughts on the readings (discussion forum)
  • Optional app review assignment

Week 5 – Accessibility & More

Accessibility features of mobile devices

Readings & Discussion

  • Readings about assistive technology
  • Your thoughts on the readings (discussion forum)

Idea generation assignment

  • Ideas for using apps in library programs & services
  • Apps that wow

How this eCourse Works

The eCourse begins on June 5, 2017. Your participation will require approximately five to six hours a week, at times that fit your schedule. All activities take place on the website, and you will be expected to:

  • Read, listen to or view online content
  • Post to online discussion boards
  • Complete weekly assignments or activities

Instructor Nicole Hennig will monitor discussion boards regularly during the five-week period, lead group discussions, and will also answer individual questions. All interaction will take place on the eCourse site, which will be available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. It’s recommended that students log into the site on the first day of class or within a few days for an overview of the content and to begin the first lesson.

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more on mobile apps in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=mobile+apps

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