Archive of ‘Bring Your Own Device BYOD’ category

mobile use by students

Students’ Mobile Learning Practices in Higher Education: A Multi-Year Study

Figure 9. Reasons students cited for NOT wanting instructors to use mobile devices, 2012 and 2014

Figure 10. Device use for learning, 2012 and 2014

++++++++++++++
more about mobile use in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=mobile+use

mobile apps education

5 questions to ask before your university goes mobile

Here’s how to evaluate the potential for mobile solutions

Before they set foot in their first class, incoming college students face a maze of requirements and resources that will be critical to their success. So-called “student supports” abound. Yet forty percent of first-year students don’t return the following year, and a growing number report information overload as they navigate campus life amid newfound independence.

The nine in 10 undergraduates who own smartphones are probably familiar with the xkcd about it. College-aged Americans check their devices more than 150 times per day. So it should be no surprise that a growing body of research suggests that mobile solutions can play a critical role in enhancing the student experience.

1. Is the mobile app native?
We’ve all had the frustrating experience of using a smartphone to navigate a page that was designed for a computer. But when designing native mobile apps, developers start with the small screen, which leads to simpler, cleaner platforms that get rid of the clutter of the desktop browsing experience.

As smartphones overtake laptops and desktops as the most popular way for young people to get online, native design is critical for universities to embrace.

2. Is there a simple content management system?

It’s also critical to explore whether mobile apps integrate with an institution’s existing LMS, CMS, and academic platforms. The most effective apps will allow you to draw upon and translate existing content and resources directly into the mobile experience.
My note: this is why it is worth experimenting with alternatives to LMS, such as Facebook Groups: they allow ready-to-use SIMPLE mobile interface.

3. Does it allow you to take targeted action?

At-risk or disengaged students often require more targeted communication and engagement which, if used effectively, can prevent them falling into those categories in the first place.

Unlike web-based tools, mobile apps should not only communicate information, but also generate insights and reports, highlighting key information into how students use the platform.

4. Does it offer communication and social networking opportunities?

Teenagers who grew up with chatbots and Snapchat expect instant communication to be part of any online interaction. Instead of making students toggle between the student affairs office and conversations with advisors, mobile platforms that offer in-app messaging can streamline the experience and keep users engaged.

5. Does it empower your staff?

++++++++
more on mobile in education in this IMS blog:
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=mobile+education

ECAR Study of Undergraduate Students and Information Technology, 2017

ECAR Study of Undergraduate Students and Information Technology, 2017

  • Students would like their instructors to use more technology in their classes.Technologies that provide students with something (e.g., lecture capture, early-alert systems, LMS, search tools) are more desired than those that require students to give something (e.g., social media, use of their own devices, in-class polling tools). We speculate that sound pedagogy and technology use tied to specific learning outcomes and goals may improve the desirability of the latter.
  • Students reported that faculty are banning or discouraging the use of laptops, tablets, and (especially) smartphones more often than in previous years. Some students reported using their devices (especially their smartphones) for nonclass activities, which might explain the instructor policies they are experiencing. However, they also reported using their devices for productive classroom activities (e.g., taking notes, researching additional sources of information, and instructor-directed activities).

++++++++++++++
more on ECAR studies in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=ecar

managing phone use in class

3 Tips for Managing Phone Use in Class

Setting cell phone expectations early is key to accessing the learning potential of these devices and minimizing the distraction factor.
https://www.edutopia.org/article/3-tips-managing-phone-use-class
Ten is now the average age when children receive their first cell phones
develop a positive mobile mental health in the first weeks of school by discussing their ideas on cell phone use, setting up a stoplight management system, and establishing a class contract
Build a digital citizenship curriculum that includes mobile device use.

Ask your students questions such as:

  • What do you like to do on your cell phone and why? (If they don’t have one, what would they like to do?)
  • What are the most popular apps and websites you use?
  • What do you think are inappropriate ways that cell phones have been used?
  • What is poor cell phone etiquette? Why?
  • How can cell phones help you learn?
  • How can cell phones distract from your learning?
  • How do you feel about your cell phone and the activities you do on your phone?
  • What should teachers know about your cell phone use that you worry we do not understand?
  • Do you know how to use your cell phone to gather information, to collaborate on academic projects, to evaluate websites?
  • How can we work together to create a positive mobile mental health?

Using a Stoplight Management Approach

Post a red button on the classroom door:  the cell phone parking lot.
Post a yellow button on the classroom door
Post a green button on the classroom door

Establishing a Class Contract: Ask them to brainstorm consequences and write them into a class contract.

++++++++++++
more on the use of BYOD in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2017/04/03/use-of-laptops-in-the-classroom/

VR and AR doubles each year

Report: VR and AR to Double Each Year Through 2021

By Joshua Bolkan  08/07/17

https://thejournal.com/articles/2017/08/07/report-vr-and-ar-to-double-each-year-through-2021.aspx

a new forecast from International Data Corp. (IDC).

Canada will see the fastest growth, with a CAGR of 145.2 percent over the forecast period. Other leaders in terms of growth include Central and Eastern Europe at 133.5 percent, Western Europe at 121.2 percent and the U.S. at 120.5 percent.

+++++++++++++++

Leslie Fisher Thinks Augmented Reality First, Then VR in the Classroom

An interview with the former Apple K–12 systems engineer, who will participate in multiple sessions during ISTE.

By Richard Chang 05/12/17

https://thejournal.com/Articles/2017/05/12/Leslie-Fisher-Presents-at-Ed-Tech-Conferences-for-a-Living.aspx

THE Journal: What do you think about virtual reality (VR) and augmented reality (AR) in the classroom? Is the cost point for VR prohibitive?

In virtual reality, one of my favorite apps is CoSpaces. It allows anyone to design a 3D space, and then interact with it in virtual reality.

Virtual reality can be quite affordable with Google Cardboard. We can get into basic interaction in VR with Cardboard. There are 40 or 50 VR apps where you can simply use Cardboard and explore. Google Street View allows you to do virtual viewing of many different locations. That technology augments what the teacher is doing.

Most kids can’t afford to buy their own Oculus headset. That price point is quite a bit higher. But we don’t need to have 30 kids using Oculus all of the time. Two or three might work

+++++++++++++++
more on VR and AR in this IMS blog
https://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=virtual+reality

directions immersive learning

Emerging Directions in Immersive Learning

Presented by: Maya Georgieva and Emory Craig, May 17, 1:00 – 2:00pm (EDT)

http://events.shindig.com/event/campus-tech

Digital Bodies cofounders Emory Craig and Maya Georgieva for an interactive session that will examine five developments in virtual, augmented, and mixed reality with the greatest potential to impact teaching and learning.   Ask your questions live as they explore how groundbreaking developments in VR, AR, MR, and artificial intelligence will power immersive technologies and transform learning.

Hololense $3000 and it is difficult to use outside. persistent digital objects
https://mixed.reality.news/news/whats-difference-between-hololens-meta-magic-leap-0171361/

https://events.google.com/io/

https://unity3d.com/sundance2017

education: new media, gaming

storytelling: immersive storytelling and AI

Jeremy Bailenson https://vhil.stanford.edu/

Julie Johnston – https://uits.iu.edu/learning-spaces

AR VR K12

Survey: Augmented and Virtual Reality Yet to Gain Traction in K–12

By Richard Chang 04/21/17

https://thejournal.com/articles/2017/04/21/survey-augmented-and-virtual-reality-yet-to-gain-traction-in-k12.aspx

survey by the nonprofit organization Project Tomorrow.

annual Speak Up survey of more than 510,000 K–12 students, parents and educators

Middle school students seem to be the most excited about AR and VR in the school setting. Among students in grades 6 through 8, 33 percent said they would like to see augmented reality apps in their ultimate school, and 47 percent of those kids said they would like to see virtual reality experiences and hardware in their ultimate school.

teachers, principals and parents were more skeptical. Only 12 percent of parents and principals said they want to see AR apps in their ultimate school, while 13 percent of teachers said the same.

"ar

+++++++++++++++++
more on VR in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=virtual+reality

more on AR in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=augmented+reality

Save

TPR presentation

Presentation to TPR (Technology and Pedagogy Roundtable), April 19, 2017
WSB 335 | short link: http://tinyurl.com/tprIMS

My name is Plamen Miltenoff and I am faculty (http://web.stcloudstate.edu/pmiltenoff/faculty/) with InforMedia Services (http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/free-tech-instruction/):

https://www.facebook.com/InforMediaServices/
https://twitter.com/SCSUtechinstruc
https://plus.google.com/u/0/115966710162153290760

Through the years, I am working with the application of educational technologies in the curriculum process.

During my work and research, I notice an important discussion in the community of higher education:

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2017/04/03/use-of-laptops-in-the-classroom/

The topic of the use of electronic devices, being that laptops, and more recently smartphones, tablets 2in1 laptops (or hybrid laptops) has been a disputable issue among instructors.

Under the tutelage of TPR, I am offering to facilitate a campus-wide discussion on the use of electronic devices in the classroom. The short-range goal of such discussion is to provide a platform for SCSU instructors to share their pedagogical experience in handling the use of electronic devices in the classroom.

The long-range goal of such discussion will be to start a conversation among SCSU faculty about the didactic of educational technology; going beyond just learning technology and start building practices for successful use of technology for teaching and learning.

 

WebVR experiments

Google Cardboard Users Can Now Play WebVR Experiments

By Sri Ravipati  04/13/17

https://thejournal.com/articles/2017/04/13/google-cardboard-users-can-now-play-webvr-experiments.aspx

In February, Google added WebVR to Chrome on Daydream-ready phones (like Pixel and ZenFone). The WebVR standard allows users to view virtual reality (VR) experiences in a browser like Chrome by simply tapping a link and putting on a compatible headset. Yesterday, the company revealed it added support for Google Cardboard and launched a new homepage for web-based VR experiments.

WebVR support on Chrome for Oculus Rift and HTC Vive is “coming soon.”

+++++++++++++++
more on Google Cardboard in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=cardboard

1 2 3 12