Archive of ‘collaboration and creativity’ category

working with a toxic colleague

Three tips for working with a toxic colleague

long-time squabbles over promotions, resources and power create embittered workplace foes who would rather walk across the street than share a sidewalk with each other.” This is probably even more the case in government organizations than private ones, since in the private sector it is easier to get rid of problems by firing or reassigning people in dysfunctional relationships.

The first has the enormous virtue of being straightforward rather than devious or wily, tactics that always run the risk of backfiring, but even more so when relationships are already hostile. “Attempt to reconcile,” Perry urges. Try “the old-fashioned approach and sit down and propose a fresh restart,” he writes. “Bring your humility and focus on describing why a thaw is best for the team and firm. Once a détente is agreed upon, make certain to find ample opportunities to display good faith.”

seek to “partner with the adversary to navigate a crisis” as a way to repair a bad relationship.

overcoming this hostility was to put the boys in a situation where they could not deal with a problem with only the people in one group, but work by both groups was necessary. (so it is a management’s failure, what we have here, since the management does not even want to recognize that there is a problem)

The third piece of advice is to engage a broker. “Particularly for situations involving warring… senior executives,” Perry notes, “the temporary use of a broker or intermediary can facilitate progress on issues.”


Students, teachers, and organizations will join together online to celebrate and demonstrate global collaboration on September 15, 2016. On Global Collaboration Day, educators and professionals from around the world will host connective projects and events and invite public participation. This event is brought to you by VIF International Education, Google for Education, iEARN-USA and Edmodo.

The primary goals of this 24-hour, worldwide event are to:

  • demonstrate the power of global connectivity in classrooms, schools, institutions of informal learning and universities around the world
  • introduce others to the collaborative tools, resources and projects that are available to educators today
  • to focus attention on the need for developing globally competent students and teachers throughout the world

Global Collaboration Day will take place on September 15 in participant time zones. Classrooms, schools, and organizations will design and host engaging online activities for others to join. Events will range from mystery location calls to professional development events to interviews with experts. All events will be collated in an online calendar viewable in participants’ individual time zones. Participants will be connected on Twitter via the hashtag #globaled16.

An optional new activity this year will be the Great Global Project Challenge. Between now and October 1, 2016, global educators will design collaborative projects using a variety of platforms in which other students and teachers may participate during the course of the 2016-2017 school year. The objective is to create and present as many globally connective projects for students and educators as possible. The final deadline for submissions into our project directory is October 1, but participants are also encouraged to do an introductory activity for their project on Global Collaboration Day as well.

Global Collaboration Day is a project of the Global Education Conference Network, a free online virtual conference that takes place every November during International Education Week. GCD, along with Global Education Day at ISTE and Global Leadership Week, are events designed to connect educators and keep global conversations going year round.

For more information about Global Collaboration Day, please visit our main web site. A digital flyer is also available for distribution.

Follow us on social media:


Help us spread the word. Here are some sample Tweets:

  • Join us for Global Collaboration Day! Details here: #globaled16
  • YOUR ORG’S TWITTER HANDLE is pleased to partner with @GlobalEdCon and educators around the globe for Global Collaboration Day:
  • Are you an education leader? Inspire global collaboration on Global Collaboration Day 9/15. #globaled16
  • Learn more about participating in the Global Collaboration Day celebration: #globaled16
  • Project hosts are sought for Global Collaboration Day. Details here: #globaled16


Logos and Badges for Participants, Hosts, Partners and Sponsors are located here:

Interested in serving as an outreach partner?

Send an email to Lucy Gray ( indicating your interest. Include information on how you can help us get the word out to networks with 5000 members or more.

classroom discussions on privacy

Dear colleagues,

the topics of privacy pertaining technology is becoming ubiquitous.
If you feel that the content of your class material can benefit of such discussions, please let us know.

Please have  some titles, which can help you brainstorm topics for discussions in your classes:

Power, Privacy, and the Internet

Privacy groups slam Department of Homeland Security social media proposal

FBI quietly changes its privacy rules for accessing NSA data on Americans

Facebook canceled a student’s internship after he highlighted a massive privacy issue

Samsung’s Privacy Policy Warns Customers Their Smart TVs Are Listening

Teenagers, The Internet, And Privacy

Online privacy: It’s time for a new security paradigm

On social media, privacy, etc.

Hacking the Future: Privacy, Identity, and Anonymity On the Web

Are We Puppets in a Wired World?

How Teens Deal With Privacy and Mobile Apps

If you seek  more tangible, hands-on assistance with similar and/or any topics regarding technology, please do not hesitate to contact us.

Communication Tool for Teachers and Parents

A New Great Communication Tool for Teachers and Parents
July 7, 2016 Appletree is a new educational platform that was recently introduced at ISTE 2016. Apple tree is a classroom communication tool that makes it super easy for teachers to communicate with parents and enhance students learning.

Teacher Leadership in Schools

7 Qualities That Promote Teacher Leadership in Schools

7 Qualities That Promote Teacher Leadership in Schools

three shifts in policy and leadership culture may help move these efforts forward:

  1. New types of assessment are gaining ground. Several states are piloting performance-based assessments to replace standardized testing.
  2. Exemplars in the business community are now promoting flat organizational structures, where employees work in smaller teams and have more voice and power over how they work.
  3. Teachers are more networked than ever before, providing a unique opportunity to share and spread good teaching practice.

crucial decisions about curriculum, leadership roles and discipline.

While the hybrid roles that teachers play at teacher-powered schoolsmay seem like a lot of work, they give teachers the power to decide what programs, textbooks, software, etc., should or should not be used in order to make space for the community’s vision. And when teachers decide together on the vision and strategy to reach all students, they are often more invested and excited by the change they are creating from within.


Some of the best available examples of how to improve teacher quality and promote teacher leadership lie in models offered by other high-performing places, like Finland and Singapore.

Seven qualities must be in place.

  1. A vision and strategy for teacher leadership, “with stated goals and clear images of tasks to be done, must be in place.”  Teachers must feel part of creating this vision in order to buy in.
  2. A supportive administration. “Principals must be willing to share power with teachers and must have the skills to cultivate them as leaders,” most educational leadership programs focus on supervising teachers, not supporting them as leaders.
  3. There need to be appropriate human and fiscal resources.
  4. Work structures that enable authentic collaboration are crucial. While more resources help on this point, there are creative ways to stretch limited dollars.
  5. Supportive social norms and working relationships are key to teacher leadership. “All too often, policymakers develop incentives to motivate teachers and administrators,” . “Instead, policies and programs should be in place to value teachers spreading their expertise to one another, allowing teaching to be exercised as a team sport.”
  6. Organizational politics must allow for blurred lines between roles. Teachers can only take on leadership roles at the expense of principals and district-level administrators. This also requires teacher unions to act more as “professional guilds” and for districts to follow the example of some for-profit businesses that are flattening bureaucracies.
  7. The school and system must be oriented toward risk-taking and inquiry. Just as students need hands-on applied learning rooted in inquiry, so, too, do teachers need powerful driving questions to push their work forward. “School systems must be able to interrogatethemselves about the extent to which they create opportunities for teachers to learn and lead in ways that spread teaching expertise and improve student outcomes.”


google cast

Google Cast for Education Allows Students, Teachers to Share the Projector

By David Nagel

Cast for Education is an app that works on Chrome OS, macOS and Windows. The app is launching in a public beta today and is available as a free download. The difference between Cast and other screen sharing solutions is network-independence.

Google today also launched the full version of its educational virtual reality tool Google Expeditions, along with a new Quiz feature for Google Apps for Education.


more on screen-sharing opportunities in education:

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