Archive of ‘digital citizenship’ category

win for net neutrality

Big Telecom lost in court, but an open internet won. So did you.

http://finance.yahoo.com/news/net-neutrality-verizon-212332710.html

U.S. Appeals Court Upholds Net Neutrality Rules In Full

http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2016/06/14/471286113/u-s-appeals-court-holds-up-net-neutrality-rules-in-full

Net Neutrality Won Big Today, But Don’t Celebrate Just Yet

http://www.wired.com/2016/06/net-neutrality-won-big-today-dont-celebrate-just-yet/

Net Neutrality Court Decision Yields Early Winners And Losers

http://www.forbes.com/sites/howardhomonoff/2016/06/15/net-neutrality-court-decision-yields-early-winners-and-losers/

News about #netneutrality on Twitter

more on net neutrality in this blog:

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=net+neutrality

pop computing

American schools are teaching our kids how to code all wrong

Idit Harel CEO, Globaloria, May 25, 2016

The light and fluffy version of computer science—which is proliferating as a superficial response to the increased need for coders in the workplace—is a phenomenon I refer to as “pop computing.” While calling all policy makers and education leaders to consider “computer science education for all” is a good thing, the coding culture promoted by Code.org and its library of movie-branded coding apps provide quick experiences of drag-and-drop code entertainment.

playing with coding apps as compared to learning to design an app using code. Building an app takes time and requires multi-dimensional learning contexts, pathways and projects.

Computing and computer science is the equivalent of immersing in a thicker study of music—its origins, influences, aesthetics, applications, theories, composition, techniques, variations and meanings. In other words, the actual foundations and experiences that change an individual’s mindset.

As noted by MIT’s Marvin Minsky and Alan Kay, computational innovation and literacy have much in common with music literacy. Just as would-be musicians become proficient by listening improvising and composing, and not just by playing other people’s compositions, so would-be programmers become proficient by designing prototypes and models that work for solving real problems, doing critical thinking and analysis, and creative collaboration—none of which can be accomplished in one hour of coding. In other words, just as a kid playing Guitar Hero wouldn’t be considered a musician, someone playing with coding apps isn’t exactly a coder or computer scientist.

more on coding in this IMS blog:

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=coding

big data and the government

What can the government do about big data fairness?

https://fcw.com/articles/2016/05/23/big-data-fairness.aspx

At a Ford Foundation conference dubbed Fairness by Design, officials, academics and advocates discussed how to address the problem of encoding human bias in algorithmic analysis. The White House recently issued a report on the topic to accelerate research into the issue.

The FTC released two studies on how big data is used to segment consumers into profiles and interests.

U.S. CTO Megan Smith said the government has been “creating a seat for these techies,” but that training future generations of data scientists to tackle these issues depends on what we do today. “It’s how did we teach our children?” she said. “Why don’t we teach math and science the way we teach P.E. and art and music and make it fun?”

“Ethics is not just an elective, but some portion of the main core curriculum.”

more on big data in this IMS blog:

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=big+data

online risk and teenagers

Researchers: Forget Internet Abstinence; Teens Need some Online Risk

By Dian Schaffhauser 05/16/16

https://thejournal.com/articles/2016/05/16/researchers-forget-internet-abstinence-teens-need-to-face-some-amount-of-online-risk.aspx

My note: after years of imposing Internet filters at schools, “cap” students’ natural curiosity by denying open access to the Internet, etc., this is the first article, which openly defies the bureaucratic / technocratic approach to regulation of the acquisition of knowledge at American schools.

the conclusion from a Pennsylvania State University research project that examined adolescent online safety. This approach includes an important role for teachers as “trusted confidantes” and “educated advisors.”

The results, “Dear Diary: Teens Reflect on Their Weekly Online Risk Experiences,” were published by the Association for Computing Machinery and presented at the organization’s recent Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems.

“Teens have a strong sense of cost vs. reward, so if we can educate them more clearly on the costs associated with their actions, they may make better decisions on their own,”

individual use of Internet and cloud services

Internet and cloud services – statistics on the use by individuals. Half of Europeans used the internet on the go and a fifth saved files on internet storage space in 2014

http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/statistics-explained/index.php/Internet_and_cloud_services_-_statistics_on_the_use_by_individuals

Use of internet and other means for sharing files electronically, EU-28, 2014 (% of individuals)4

Use of internet and other means for sharing files electronically, EU-28, 2014 (% of individuals)4

REP in digital citizenship

Digital citizenship is more important than ever

By Mike Ribble 9/15/2015

R is for respect yourself and others. 

Etiquette. Students need to understand how their technology use affects others. Remind them that there is a person on the other end of their text, tweet, comment or post.

Access. Not everyone has the same opportunities with technology, whether the issue is  physical, socio-economic or location. Those who have more access to technology need to help those who don’t.

Law. The ease of using online tools has allowed some people to steal, harass and cause problems for others online. Students need to know they can’t take content without permission, or at least give credit to those who created it.

E is for educating yourself and others. 

Literacy. Learning happens everywhere. Regardless of whether we get our information from friends, family or online, we need to be aware that it might not be correct. Students need to understand technology and what it can do and be willing to learn new skills so they can use it properly.

Communication. Knowing when and where to use technology is important. Using email, text or social media may not be the best method for interacting with someone. Students need to think about the message first, then the method, and decide if the manner and audience is appropriate.

Commerce. Technology allows us to buy and sell across the globe. Students should be careful about sharing personal and credit card information. Online commerce comes with risks.

P is for protecting yourself and others.

Rights and responsibilities. Build trust so that if something happens online, students are willing to share their problems or concerns about what has happened. Students should know who they are friends with on social networking sites so that they can remain safe online.

Security. It is everyone’s responsibility to guard their tools and data by having software and applications that protect them from online intruders. When we are all connected, everyone is responsible for security.

Health and wellness. There needs to be a balance between the online world and the real world. Students should establish limits with technology and spend quality face-to-face time with friends and family.

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More on digital citizenship in this blog:

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=digital+citizenship

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