Archive of ‘digital citizenship’ category

REP in digital citizenship

Digital citizenship is more important than ever

By Mike Ribble 9/15/2015

R is for respect yourself and others. 

Etiquette. Students need to understand how their technology use affects others. Remind them that there is a person on the other end of their text, tweet, comment or post.

Access. Not everyone has the same opportunities with technology, whether the issue is  physical, socio-economic or location. Those who have more access to technology need to help those who don’t.

Law. The ease of using online tools has allowed some people to steal, harass and cause problems for others online. Students need to know they can’t take content without permission, or at least give credit to those who created it.

E is for educating yourself and others. 

Literacy. Learning happens everywhere. Regardless of whether we get our information from friends, family or online, we need to be aware that it might not be correct. Students need to understand technology and what it can do and be willing to learn new skills so they can use it properly.

Communication. Knowing when and where to use technology is important. Using email, text or social media may not be the best method for interacting with someone. Students need to think about the message first, then the method, and decide if the manner and audience is appropriate.

Commerce. Technology allows us to buy and sell across the globe. Students should be careful about sharing personal and credit card information. Online commerce comes with risks.

P is for protecting yourself and others.

Rights and responsibilities. Build trust so that if something happens online, students are willing to share their problems or concerns about what has happened. Students should know who they are friends with on social networking sites so that they can remain safe online.

Security. It is everyone’s responsibility to guard their tools and data by having software and applications that protect them from online intruders. When we are all connected, everyone is responsible for security.

Health and wellness. There needs to be a balance between the online world and the real world. Students should establish limits with technology and spend quality face-to-face time with friends and family.

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More on digital citizenship in this blog:

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=digital+citizenship

wearables

Report: Wearables To Top 10 Million Shipments in 2016

By Joshua Bolkan 03/21/16

Global sales of wearable devices will exceed 10 million this year, up 32.8 percent over 2015, according to a new forecast from International Data Corp. (IDC). That total will more than double by the end of the forecast period, 2020, to hit 237.1 million shipments if the company’s prediction holds true.

“Watch and wristband shipments will reach a combined total of 100 million shipments in 2016, up from 72.2 million in 2015,” according to a news release. “Other form factors, such as clothing, eyewear, and hearables, are expected to reach 9.8 million units in 2016 and will more than double their share by 2020. This will open the door for new experiences, use cases, and applications going forward.

rethinking intelligence

Rethinking Intelligence: How Does Imagination Measure Up?

http://ww2.kqed.org/mindshift/2016/04/11/rethinking-intelligence-how-does-imagination-measure-up

Dr. Scott Barry Kaufman When he was young, Kaufman had central auditory processing disorder, which made it hard for him to process verbal information in real time. He was asked to repeat third grade because he was considered a “slow” learner.

Kaufman thinks the traditional IQ test does a good job of measuring general cognitive ability, but says it misses all the ways that ability interacts with engagement. An individual’s goals within the learning classroom and excitement about a topic affect how he or she pursues learning, none of which is captured on IQ tests. Worse, those tests are often used to filter people in or out of special programs.

FOUR PRACTICES TO CULTIVATE CHILDREN’S CREATIVITY

  1. allowing more solitary reflective time in kids’ schedules. Whether it’s the constant demands on attention at school or in after-school activities, there often isn’t enough time in a child’s day when she can switch off the executive functioning network and tap into the imagination network.
  2. “We support obsessive passion, but not harmonious passion,” Kaufman said. He defines harmonious passion as a core part of people’s identity that makes them feel good about themselves. Harmonious passion is characterized by flexible engagement, where a child can abandon the pursuit if it isn’t paying dividends.
  3. give young kids a diverse set of experiences in order to increase the chances of inspiration. “Lots of things add meaning to our lives,” he said.
  4. educators, parents, and policymakers need to reset their mindsets around student ability. “Kids who think differently are not appreciated in our school system at all

it’s even worth measuring imagination, but Kaufman believes that measurement is important so researchers can see how changing behavior affects creative achievement. But he hopes the measurements are never used as another sorting mechanism.

My note: Kaufman makes a new call for an old trend. The futility of testing is raging across the United States K12 system. Higher education is turned into the last several decades (similarly to the United States health care system) into a cash cow. When the goal is profit, then good education goes down the drain. Cultivating children’s creativity cannot happen, when the foremost goals to make more money, which inevitably entails spending less cash (not only on teacher’s salaries).

 

ransomware

Adobe issues emergency update to Flash after ransomware attacks

http://www.reuters.com/article/us-adobe-systems-cyber-ransomware-idUSKCN0X502K

Ransomware

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ransomware

Ransomware is a type of malware that restricts access to the infected computer system in some way, and demands that the user pay a ransom to the malware operators to remove the restriction. Some forms of ransomware systematically encrypt files on the system’s hard drive, which become difficult or impossible to decrypt without paying the ransom for the encryption key, while some may simply lock the system and display messages intended to coax the user into paying. Ransomware typically propagates as a trojan, whose payload is disguised as a seemingly legitimate file.

Beware the Rise of Ransomware

Kim Boatman

http://us.norton.com/yoursecurityresource/detail.jsp?aid=rise_in_ransomware

Future of Education

The theme of the Fifth 21st Century Academic Forum Conference at Harvard is

Challenge 2030: Envisioning the Future of Education.”

http://www.21caf.org/5th-conference-at-harvard.html

The organizers encourage submissions that approach this theme from a variety of perspectives under three major topic tracks:

  • Education & Workforce Development
  • Information Technology
  • Innovation & Entrepreneurship

The aim of the Fifth 21st Century Academic Forum Conference at Harvard is to encourage and facilitate research initiatives that address the future of education, the workforce, and life at large. Our conferences are attended by a global audience of academic researchers, practitioners, policy makers and others interested in addressing important issues affecting education and public policy.

technology and activism

How the Rich and Powerful Use Tech to Silence Activists

Culture Date of Publication: 03.25.16.

http://www.wired.com/2016/03/truth-and-power/

Truth and Power, the final episode of which airs tonight on Pivot. Directed by Brian Knappenberger.

Knappenberger, who directed the feature-length documentary The Internet’s Own Boy, about the late Reddit co-founder Aaron Swartz.

Social Media Has Helped Activists Reclaim the Narrative

it’s not just activists who are benefiting from new technologies. Knappenberger spends nearly half the series carefully explaining the myriad ways governments and corporations use digital tools to surveil social movements. From examining the cell-phone tracking technologies used by law enforcement to uncovering how repressive regimes work with American tech companies to thwart social movements, the series offers up a smart meditation on the threat of digital surveillance on political dissent

It’s a problem Knappenberger illustrates in the “Activists or Terrorists” episode, where he unpacks how “Ag-gag” laws were passed under pressure from corporate lobbying and have made it illegal to film or photograph inside any animal farm without consent of the facility’s owner.

Prisoners for Sale,” the seventh episode, explores the story of two inmates-turned-journalists who started an independent publication to document systemic failures of the prison industrial complex.

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More on technology and civil disobedience in this IMS blog

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/?s=civil&submit=Search

your social media account cracked

This is what happens when someone hacks your Spotify account

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