Archive of ‘digital identity’ category

RFID blocking

There Are Plenty Of RFID-Blocking Products, But Do You Need Them?

hackers can access your credit card data wirelessly, through something called radio frequency identification, or RFID

card has a tiny RFID sensor chip. These chips are supposed to make life easier by emitting radio signals for fast identification. The technology helps keep track of livestock and inventory. It makes automatic payment on toll roads and faster scanning of passports possible, and, starting around 2004, brought us contactless payment with certain credit cards.

REI and other companies sell a range of RFID-blocking products and say the number of customers looking for travel bags and credit card sleeves has been growing. That’s despite the fact that the percentage of credit cards with RFID chips in the U.S. is extremely small.

Still, people are worried about electronic pickpocketing — worried enough to strap on RFID-blocking fanny packs, even skinny jeans. In 2014, the San Francisco-based clothing company Betabrand partnered with Norton Security to create the first pair of denim with RFID protected pockets.

Eva Velasquez, president of the Identity Theft Resource Center, says from a consumer perspective, deciding whether to invest in RFID-blocking technology is all about evaluating risk. In the next few years, there will undoubtedly be millions more of these cards on the market.

if you’re worried about e-pickpocketing but don’t want to spend much money, you can make your own blocking wallet or wrap your cards or passport in a thick piece of aluminum foil. According to Consumer Reports, that works as well as most RFID protectors on the market.
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more on cybersecurity in this IMS blog

girl scouts, badges for cybersecurity

Girl Scouts to Earn Badges in Cybersecurity

The education program is being developed in a partnership between the Girl Scouts and Palo Alto Networks. Jun 23, 2017

https://securitytoday.com/articles/2017/06/23/girl-scouts-to-earn-badges-in-cybersecurity.aspx

The education program, which aims to reach as many as 1.8 million Girl Scouts in kindergarten through sixth grade, is being developed in a partnership between the Girl Scouts and Palo Alto Networks, a security company, the organization said in a press release.

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more on cybersecurity in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=cybersecurity

social media in your course

8 Things You Should Know before Using Social Media in Your Course

Jennifer Rafferty, Director, OLC Institute for Professional Development, 

https://onlinelearningconsortium.org/8-things-you-should-know-before-using-social-media-in-your-course

a variety of available platforms, and many creative ways that faculty are integrating social media into their teaching practice.

  • how the digital medium will foster engagement and enhance learning outcomes.
  • aware of the implications of having students post content on third-party services (those not provided or hosted by your institution).
  • Social media usage in the classroom intersects with both FERPA and Copyright Compliance, so keep this checklist handy as you develop your class activity.

Include details about the activity in your syllabus & course description.

Use contracts.
Link to institutional policies.
Use aliases for social media accounts.
Teach your students to use digital media responsibly.
Know where to provide assignment feedback.
Don’t use personal accounts for university business.
Understand the Terms of Service.

Sources

Classification of Social Media Platforms, DelValle Institute Knowledge Base, Office of Public Health Preparedness. Retrieved on March 24, 2017 from  https://delvalle.bphc.org/mod/wiki/view.php?pageid=65

Copyright Clearance Center, Inc. 2005. Using Digital Content. Retrieved on March 24, 2017 from http://www.copyright.com/Services/copyrightoncampus/basics/teach.html

Educause, Is Your Use of Social Media FERPA Compliant? Retrieved on March 24, 2017 from http://www.educause.edu/ero/article/your-use-social-media-ferpa-compliant

Kind, T., Genrich G. and Chretien, K.(2010)  Social Media Policies at US Medical Schools. Medical Education Online.  Retrieved on March 24, 2017 from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2941429/

Meyer, L., (2015). Six Alternative Social Media Tools for Teaching and Learning, Campus Technology. Retrieved on March 24, 2017 from https://campustechnology.com/Articles/2015/01/07/6-Alternative-Social-Media-Tools-for-Teaching-and-Learning.aspx?Page=4

Orlando, J., 2011. FERPA and Social Media, Faculty Focus. Retrieved on March 24, 2017 from http://www.facultyfocus.com/articles/teaching-with-technology-articles/ferpa-and-social-media/

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more on social media for teaching practices in this IMS blog

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=social+media+teaching

NMC Horizon Report 2017

NMC Horizon Report > 2017 Library Edition

http://www.nmc.org/publication/nmc-horizon-report-2017-library-edition/

PDF file 2017-nmc-horizon-report-library-EN-20ml00b

p. 26 Improving Digital Literacy

As social networking platforms proliferate and more interactions take place digitally, there are more opportunities for propagation of misinformation, copyright infringement, and privacy breaches.
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2017/03/28/fake-news-3/
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2017/03/28/fake-news-resources/

p. 34 Embracing the need for radical change

40% of faculty report that their students ” rarely” interact with campus librarians.

Empathy as the Leader’s Path to Change | Leading From the Library, By on October 27, 2016, http://lj.libraryjournal.com/2016/10/opinion/leading-from-the-library/empathy-as-the-leaders-path-to-change-leading-from-the-library/

Empathy as a critical quality for leaders was popularized in Daniel Goleman’s work about emotional intelligence. It is also a core component of Karol Wasylyshyn’s formula for achieving remarkable leadership. Elizabeth Borges, a women’s leadership program organizer and leadership consultant, recommends a particular practice, cognitive empathy.

Leadership in disruptive times, , First Published September 27, 2016, http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/0340035216658911

What is library leadership?  a library leader is defined as the individual who articulates a vision for the organization/task and is able to inspire support and action to achieve the vision. A manager, on the other hand, is the individual tasked with organizing and carrying out the day-to-day operational activities to achieve the vision.Work places are organized in hierarchical and in team structures. Managers are appointed to administer business units or organizations whereas leaders may emerge from all levels of the hierarchical structures. Within a volatile climate the need for strong leadership is essential.  

Leaders are developed and educated within the working environment where they act and co-work with their partners and colleagues. Effective leadership complies with the mission and goals of the organization. Several assets distinguish qualitative leadership:

Mentoring. Motivation. Personal development and skills. Inspiration and collaboration. Engagement. Success and failure. Risk taking. Attributes of leaders.

Leaders require having creative minds in shaping strategies and solving problems. They are mentors for the staff, work hard and inspire them to do more with less and to start small and grow big. Staff need to be motivated to work at their optimum performance level. Leadership entails awareness of the responsibilities inherent to the roles of a leader. However, effective leadership requires the support of the upper management.

p. 36. Developments in Technology for Academic and Research Libraries

http://horizon.wiki.nmc.org/Horizon+Topics

  1. consumer technologies
  2. Digital strategies are not so much technologies as they are ways of using devices and software to enrich teaching, learning, research and information management, whether inside or outside the library. Effective Digital strategies can be used in both information and formal learning; what makes them interesting is that they transcended conventional ideas to create something that feels new, meaningful, and 21st century.
  3. enabling technologies
    this group of technologies is where substantive technological innovation begins to be visible.
  4. Internet technologies.
  5. learning technologies
  6. social media technologies. could have been subsumed under the consumer technology category, but they have become so ever-present and so widely used in every part of society that they have been elevated to their own category. As well-established as social media is, it continues to evolve at a rapid pace, with new ideas, tools, and developments coming online constantly.
  7. Visualization technologies.  from simple infographics to complex forms of visual data analysis. What they have in common is that they tap the brain’s inherent ability to rapidly process visual information, identify patterns, and sense order in complex situations. These technologies are a growing cluster of tools and processes for mining large data sets, exploring dynamic processes, and generally making the complex simple.

new horizon report 2017 technologies

 

 

p. 38 Big Data
Big data has significant implications for academic libraries in their roles as facilitators and supporters of the research process. big data use in the form of digital humanities research. Libraries are increasingly seeking to recruit for positions such as research data librarians, data curation specialists, or data visualization specialists

p. 40  Digital Scholarship Technologies

digital humanities scholars are leveraging new tools to aid in their work. ubiquity of new forms of communication including social media, text analysis software such as Umigon is helping researchers gauge public sentiment. The tool aggregates and classifies tweets as negative, positive, or neutral.

p. 42 Library Services Platforms

Diversity of format and materials, in turn, required new approaches to content collection and curation that were unavailable in the incumbent integrated library systems (ILS), which are primarily designed for print materials. LSP is different from ILS in numerous ways. Conceptually, LSPs are modeled on the idea of software as a service (SaaS),which entails delivering software applications over the internet.

p. 44 Online Identity.
incorporated  the  management of digital footprints into their programming and resources

simplify the idea of digital footprint as“data about the data” that people are searching or using online. As resident champions for advancing digital literacy,304 academic and research libraries are well-positioned to guide the process of understanding and crafting online identities.

Libraries are becoming integral players in helping students understand how to create and manage their online identities. website includes a social media skills portal that enables students to view their digital presence through the lens in which others see them, and then learn how they compare to their peers.

p. 46  Artificial Intelligence

https://www.semanticscholar.org/

p. 48 IoT

beacons are another iteration of the IoT that libraries have adopted; these small wireless devices transmit a small package of data continuously so that when devices come into proximity of the beacon’s transmission, functions are  triggered based on a related application.340 Aruba Bluetooth low-energy beacons to link digital resources to physical locations, guiding patrons to these resources through their custom navigation app and augmenting the user experience with location-based information, tutorials, and videos.

students and their computer science  professor  have  partnered  with   Bavaria’s State Library to develop a library app that triggers supplementary information about its art collection or other points of interest as users explore the space

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more on Horizon Reports in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=horizon+report

social media clean up

How to Start Fresh Again on Social Media

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http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=social+media

text and data mining

38 great resources for learning data mining concepts and techniques

http://www.rubedo.com.br/2016/08/38-great-resources-for-learning-data.html

Learn data mining languages: R, Python and SQL

W3Schools – Fantastic set of interactive tutorials for learning different languages. Their SQL tutorial is second to none. You’ll learn how to manipulate data in MySQL, SQL Server, Access, Oracle, Sybase, DB2 and other database systems.
Treasure Data – The best way to learn is to work towards a goal. That’s what this helpful blog series is all about. You’ll learn SQL from scratch by following along with a simple, but common, data analysis scenario.
10 Queries – This course is recommended for the intermediate SQL-er who wants to brush up on his/her skills. It’s a series of 10 challenges coupled with forums and external videos to help you improve your SQL knowledge and understanding of the underlying principles.
TryR – Created by Code School, this interactive online tutorial system is designed to step you through R for statistics and data modeling. As you work through their seven modules, you’ll earn badges to track your progress helping you to stay on track.
Leada – If you’re a complete R novice, try Lead’s introduction to R. In their 1 hour 30 min course, they’ll cover installation, basic usage, common functions, data structures, and data types. They’ll even set you up with your own development environment in RStudio.
Advanced R – Once you’ve mastered the basics of R, bookmark this page. It’s a fantastically comprehensive style guide to using R. We should all strive to write beautiful code, and this resource (based on Google’s R style guide) is your key to that ideal.
Swirl – Learn R in R – a radical idea certainly. But that’s exactly what Swirl does. They’ll interactively teach you how to program in R and do some basic data science at your own pace. Right in the R console.
Python for beginners – The Python website actually has a pretty comprehensive and easy-to-follow set of tutorials. You can learn everything from installation to complex analyzes. It also gives you access to the Python community, who will be happy to answer your questions.
PythonSpot – A complete list of Python tutorials to take you from zero to Python hero. There are tutorials for beginners, intermediate and advanced learners.
Read all about it: data mining books
Data Jujitsu: The Art of Turning Data into Product – This free book by DJ Patil gives you a brief introduction to the complexity of data problems and how to approach them. He gives nice, understandable examples that cover the most important thought processes of data mining. It’s a great book for beginners but still interesting to the data mining expert. Plus, it’s free!
Data Mining: Concepts and Techniques – The third (and most recent) edition will give you an understanding of the theory and practice of discovering patterns in large data sets. Each chapter is a stand-alone guide to a particular topic, making it a good resource if you’re not into reading in sequence or you want to know about a particular topic.
Mining of Massive Datasets – Based on the Stanford Computer Science course, this book is often sighted by data scientists as one of the most helpful resources around. It’s designed at the undergraduate level with no formal prerequisites. It’s the next best thing to actually going to Stanford!
Big Data, Data Mining, and Machine Learning: Value Creation for Business Leaders and Practitioners – This book is a must read for anyone who needs to do applied data mining in a business setting (ie practically everyone). It’s a complete resource for anyone looking to cut through the Big Data hype and understand the real value of data mining. Pay particular attention to the section on how modeling can be applied to business decision making.
Data Smart: Using Data Science to Transform Information into Insight – The talented (and funny) John Foreman from MailChimp teaches you the “dark arts” of data science. He makes modern statistical methods and algorithms accessible and easy to implement.
Hadoop: The Definitive Guide – As a data scientist, you will undoubtedly be asked about Hadoop. So you’d better know how it works. This comprehensive guide will teach you how to build and maintain reliable, scalable, distributed systems with Apache Hadoop. Make sure you get the most recent addition to keep up with this fast-changing service.
 Online learning: data mining webinars and courses
DataCamp – Learn data mining from the comfort of your home with DataCamp’s online courses. They have free courses on R, Statistics, Data Manipulation, Dynamic Reporting, Large Data Sets and much more.
Coursera – Coursera brings you all the best University courses straight to your computer. Their online classes will teach you the fundamentals of interpreting data, performing analyzes and communicating insights. They have topics for beginners and advanced learners in Data Analysis, Machine Learning, Probability and Statistics and more.
Udemy – With a range of free and pay for data mining courses, you’re sure to find something you like on Udemy no matter your level. There are 395 in the area of data mining! All their courses are uploaded by other Udemy users meaning quality can fluctuate so make sure you read the reviews.
CodeSchool – These courses are handily organized into “Paths” based on the technology you want to learn. You can do everything from build a foundation in Git to take control of a data layer in SQL. Their engaging online videos will take you step-by-step through each lesson and their challenges will let you practice what you’ve learned in a controlled environment.
Udacity – Master a new skill or programming language with Udacity’s unique series of online courses and projects. Each class is developed by a Silicon Valley tech giant, so you know what your learning will be directly applicable to the real world.
Treehouse – Learn from experts in web design, coding, business and more. The video tutorials from Treehouse will teach you the basics and their quizzes and coding challenges will ensure the information sticks. And their UI is pretty easy on the eyes.
Learn from the best: top data miners to follow
John Foreman – Chief Data Scientist at MailChimp and author of Data Smart, John is worth a follow for his witty yet poignant tweets on data science.
DJ Patil – Author and Chief Data Scientist at The White House OSTP, DJ tweets everything you’ve ever wanted to know about data in politics.
Nate Silver – He’s Editor-in-Chief of FiveThirtyEight, a blog that uses data to analyze news stories in Politics, Sports, and Current Events.
Andrew Ng – As the Chief Data Scientist at Baidu, Andrew is responsible for some of the most groundbreaking developments in Machine Learning and Data Science.
Bernard Marr – He might know pretty much everything there is to know about Big Data.
Gregory Piatetsky – He’s the author of popular data science blog KDNuggets, the leading newsletter on data mining and knowledge discovery.
Christian Rudder – As the Co-founder of OKCupid, Christian has access to one of the most unique datasets on the planet and he uses it to give fascinating insight into human nature, love, and relationships
Dean Abbott – He’s contributed to a number of data blogs and authored his own book on Applied Predictive Analytics. At the moment, Dean is Chief Data Scientist at SmarterHQ.
Practice what you’ve learned: data mining competitions
Kaggle – This is the ultimate data mining competition. The world’s biggest corporations offer big prizes for solving their toughest data problems.
Stack Overflow – The best way to learn is to teach. Stackoverflow offers the perfect forum for you to prove your data mining know-how by answering fellow enthusiast’s questions.
TunedIT – With a live leaderboard and interactive participation, TunedIT offers a great platform to flex your data mining muscles.
DrivenData – You can find a number of nonprofit data mining challenges on DataDriven. All of your mining efforts will go towards a good cause.
Quora – Another great site to answer questions on just about everything. There are plenty of curious data lovers on there asking for help with data mining and data science.
Meet your fellow data miner: social networks, groups and meetups
Reddit – Reddit is a forum for finding the latest articles on data mining and connecting with fellow data scientists. We recommend subscribing to r/dataminingr/dataisbeautiful,r/datasciencer/machinelearning and r/bigdata.
Facebook – As with many social media platforms, Facebook is a great place to meet and interact with people who have similar interests. There are a number of very active data mining groups you can join.
LinkedIn – If you’re looking for data mining experts in a particular field, look no further than LinkedIn. There are hundreds of data mining groups ranging from the generic to the hyper-specific. In short, there’s sure to be something for everyone.
Meetup – Want to meet your fellow data miners in person? Attend a meetup! Just search for data mining in your city and you’re sure to find an awesome group near you.
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8 fantastic examples of data storytelling

8 fantastic examples of data storytelling

Data storytelling is the realization of great data visualization. We’re seeing data that’s been analyzed well and presented in a way that someone who’s never even heard of data science can get it.

Google’s Cole Nussbaumer provides a friendly reminder of what data storytelling actually is, it’s straightforward, strategic, elegant, and simple.

 

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more on text and data mining in this IMS blog
hthttp://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=data+mining

your privacy and Google

How to see everything Google knows about you

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more on privacy in this IMS blog

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=privacy

hackers versus crackers: Guccifer

Hackers versus crackers

http://www.techrepublic.com/blog/it-security/hacker-vs-cracker/

http://www.pctools.com/security-news/crackers-and-hackers/

Federal court sentences original Guccifer

By Mark Rockwell Sep 02, 2016

https://fcw.com/articles/2016/09/02/guccifer-sentence-rockwell.aspx

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more in this blog on hackers and crackers

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=hackers

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=crackers

 

Finding and Using E-Government Tools and Resources

Librarianship in the Modern Era

Cutting the Red Tape: Finding and Using E-Government Tools and Resources
Diane Kovacs

4-week eCourse
Beginning Monday, September 12, 2016

E-government tools and resources bring many people to your library for such activities as filing and paying taxes online, locating Medicare/Medicaid providers and reviews, checking student loan status, tracking regulatory changes for industries, monitoring ongoing legislation as well as codified law and court rulings, and much more. This hands-on eCourse also explores the information published online by the U. S. federal government through the Government Printing Office and specific agencies and government branches.
Experienced online instructor and consultant Diane Kovacs covers the best sites to begin researching for government information in general and specifically for business, healthcare, genealogy, history, current government, legal, regulatory, taxes, retirement, insurance, and state and local government information.

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