Archive of ‘Digital rights management (DRM)’ category

your social media account cracked

This is what happens when someone hacks your Spotify account

Power, Privacy, and the Internet

http://www.nybooks.com/blogs/gallery/2014/feb/07/power-privacy-and-internet-conference/

  • Governments, Corporations and Hackers: The Internet and Threats to the Privacy and Dignity of the Citizen:

https://api.soundcloud.com/tracks/126066881/download?secret_token=s-QvmZz&client_id=0f8fdbbaa21a9bd18210986a7dc2d72c 

  • The Internet and the Future of the Press

https://api.soundcloud.com/tracks/126066391/download?secret_token=s-v6mpP&client_id=0f8fdbbaa21a9bd18210986a7dc2d72c

  • The Internet, Repression and Dissent

https://api.soundcloud.com/tracks/126066389/download?secret_token=s-Udzom&client_id=0f8fdbbaa21a9bd18210986a7dc2d72c

 Merkel calls for separate EU internet

http://www.aljazeera.com/video/europe/2014/02/merkel-calls-separate-eu-internet-201421955226908928.html

http://www.ted.com/talks/edward_snowden_here_s_how_we_take_back_the_internet

The NSA Is Building the Country’s Biggest Spy Center (Watch What You Say)

http://www.wired.com/threatlevel/2012/03/ff_nsadatacenter/

 

 

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2015/12/03/surveillance-age-and-librarians/

Surveillance Age and Librarians

Privacy in the Surveillance Age: How Librarians Can Fight Back.
Wednesday, December 9, 2015
2pm Eastern (11am Pacific | 12pm Mountain | 1pm Central)
Register: https://goo.gl/6Qelrm
Description:
In the wake of Edward Snowden’s revelations about NSA and FBI dragnet surveillance, many Americans are concerned that their rights to privacy and intellectual freedom are under threat. But librarians are perfectly positioned to help our communities develop strategies to protect themselves against unwanted surveillance. In this webinar, Alison Macrina and April Glaser of the Library Freedom Project will talk about the landscape of surveillance, the work of the LFP, and some tips and tools librarians can use to resist pervasive surveillance in the digital age.
About the Presenters:
 
Alison Macrina is a librarian, privacy rights activist, and the founder and director of the Library Freedom Project, an initiative which aims to make real the promise of intellectual freedom in libraries by teaching librarians and their local communities about surveillance threats, privacy rights and law, and privacy-protecting technology tools to help safeguard digital freedoms. Alison is passionate about connecting surveillance issues to larger global struggles for justice, demystifying privacy and security technologies for ordinary users, and resisting an internet controlled by a handful of intelligence agencies and giant multinational corporations. When she’s not doing any of that, she’s reading.
April Glaser is a writer and an activist with the Library Freedom Project. She currently works as a mobilization specialist at Greenpeace USA, where she focuses on ending oil extraction in the Arctic. Prior to Greenpeace, April was at the Electronic Frontier Foundation, organizing around the net neutrality campaign and EFF’s grassroots programming. April also previously worked with the Prometheus Radio Project, where her efforts helped propel the passage of the Local Community Radio Act, the largest expansion of community radio in U.S. history. She lives in Oakland, California and continues to work with local organizations on a range of digital rights issues.
Can’t make it to the live show? That’s okay. The session will be recorded and available on the Carterette Series Webinars site for later viewing.
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To register for the online event
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1. Go to registration page: https://goo.gl/6Qelrm
2. Complete and submit the form.
3. A URL for the event will be emailed to you immediately after registration.
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Contact a member of the Carterette Series planning team with questions or suggestions:
carteretteserieswebinars@gmail.com
More on privacy in this IMS blog:
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/?s=privacy&submit=Search
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2013/10/23/pro-domo-sua-are-we-puppets-in-a-wired-world-surveillance-and-privacy-revisited/

Digitization and Libraries

Digitization and Libraries
Thursday, September 10, 2015
2 PM Eastern | 1 PM Central
12 PM Mountain | 11 AM Pacific

Digitization is a rapidly growing area of librarianship. Whether you’re a community repository or you need to digitize old materials to save space, the ability to start a digitization project is becoming an essential skill for the modern librarian.
Join us for a new episode of American Libraries Live, Digitization and Libraries. Our expert panel will discuss digitization in both broad and specific terms, looking at current trends and long-term implications for the library community.
Our panel will include:
• Susanne Caro, Government Documents Librarian at University of Montana, author and frequent speaker on digitization and librarianship
• Alyce Scott, Professor, School of Library & Information Science San Jose State University
Tune in for this free, streaming video broadcast! You can pre-register here for this free event (pre-registration assures you a reminder before the event), or go to http://www.americanlibrarieslive.org on September 10 at 2:00 p.m. (Eastern) to view.
We are pleased to welcome the School of Information (iSchool) at San José State University as a sponsor for this episode. The iSchool prepares individuals for careers as information professionals. Graduates work in diverse areas of the information profession, such as user experience design, digital asset management, information architecture, electronic records management, information governance, digital preservation, and librarianship. Based in the heart of Silicon Valley, the iSchool is the best place to learn online.
The iSchool’s Master of Library and Information Science (MLIS) degree program was named Outstanding Online Program by the Online Learning Consortium. This prestigious national award recognizes the school’s commitment to delivering innovative, convenient, 100% online learning solutions for students across the globe. Find out more about the iSchool’s award-winning online educational programs at ischool.sjsu.edu.

AT&T allows NSA surveillance

New Documents and Reports Confirm AT&T and NSA’s Longstanding Surveillance Partnership

https://www.reddit.com/r/technology/comments/3h64l2/new_documents_and_reports_confirm_att_and_nsas/

Please consider previous IMS blog entries on this topic:

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2014/09/25/online-privacy-its-time-for-a-new-security-paradigm/

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2014/07/01/privacy-and-surveillance-obama-advisor-john-podesta-every-country-has-a-history-of-going-over-the-line/

Teenagers, The Internet, And Privacy

The Truth About Teenagers, The Internet, And Privacy

http://www.fastcompany.com/3037962/then-and-now/the-truth-about-teenagers-the-internet-and-privacy

danah boyd, a professor at Harvard University’s Berkman Center for the Internet and Society, argues that teenagers closely scrutinize what they share online because it is a way for them to negotiate their changing identities. In her book, It’s Complicated: The Social Lives of Networked Teens, she describes how teenagers carefully curate their feeds based on the audience they are trying to reach.

Adolescents have been migrating away from Facebook and Twitter over the last few years, showing preference for sites like Snapchat, Whisper, Kik, and Secret that provide more anonymity and privacy. Part of this transition can be explained by the fact that the older social media sites stopped being cool when parents joined them, but perhaps another reason could be that teenagers growing up in the post-Snowden era implicitly understand the value of anonymity. For teens, it’s not a matter of which platform to use, but rather which works best in a particular context.

WHAT ARE YOU REVEALING ONLINE? MUCH MORE THAN YOU THINK

WHAT ARE YOU REVEALING ONLINE? MUCH MORE THAN YOU THINK

http://ideas.ted.com/2014/07/01/do-you-know-what-youre-revealing-online-much-more-than-you-think/

Right now in the U.S. it’s essentially the case that when you post information online, you give up control of it.

Some companies may give you that right, but you don’t have a natural, legal right to control your personal data. So if a company decides they want to sell it or market it or release it or change your privacy settings, they can do that.

The point is, we really don’t know how this information will be used. For instance, say I’m a merchant — once I get information about you, I can use this information to try to extract more economic surplus from the transaction. I can price-discriminate you, so that I can get more out of the transaction than you will.

I’m interested in working in this area, not because disclosure is bad — human beings disclose all the time, it’s an innate need as much as privacy is — but because we really don’t know how this information will be used in the long run.

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