Archive of ‘educational technology’ category

VR training medicine

https://www.techrepublic.com/article/free-medical-vr-training-system-being-offered-to-help-combat-the-covid-19-pandemic/

A virtual reality (VR) medical training system built by Oxford Medical Simulation (OMS) is now being offered for free during the COVID-19 pandemic to help hospitals and medical schools bring in badly-needed additional staffers to provide patient care.

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more on VR and Nursing in this IMS blog
https://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=VR+nursing

iLRN 2020

iLRN 2020: 6th International Conference of the Immersive Learning Research Network
Organized in conjunction with Educators in VR
Technically co-sponsored by the IEEE Education Society
June 21-25, 2020, Now Fully Online and in Virtual Reality!!!
Conference theme: “Vision 20/20: Hindsight, Insight, and Foresight in XR and Immersive Learning”
Conference website: https://immersivelrn.org/ilrn2020/
*** FREE registration for non-presenter EDU attendees until April 19th ***
##### TOPIC AREAS #####
XR and immersive learning in/for:
– Serious Games
– Medical & Healthcare
– Workforce & Industry
– Culture & Language
– K-12
– Museums & Libraries
– Special Education
– Geosciences
– Data Visualization
##### SESSION TYPES/ACTIVITIES #####
– Keynotes and plenaries
– Academic stream presentations (with peer-reviewed proceedings for submission to IEEE Xplore)
– Practitioner stream presentations (no paper required)
– Poster and exhibition sessions
– Workshops
– Panel sessions
– Special sessions
– Immersive Learning Adventures
– Immersive Learning Project Showcase & Competition
– Game Night
– Virtual Awards Banquet & Masquerade Ball
##### INTERESTED IN ATTENDING? #####
For a limited time, free registration is being offered to faculty, students, and staff of educational institutions (including K-12 schools/districts, universities, colleges, museums, and libraries) who wish to attend but will NOT be presenting at the conference or publishing in the proceedings. To take advantage of this offer, you must register by April 19, 2020 using an email address associated with your educational institution:
https://nam02.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fimmersivelrn.org%2Filrn2020%2Filrn-2020-fees-registration%2F&data=02%7C01%7Cpmiltenoff%40STCLOUDSTATE.EDU%7C18042fee4df246db0d4b08d7da283e4b%7C5011c7c60ab446ab9ef4fae74a921a7f%7C0%7C0%7C637217738689183646&sdata=8D%2BIdSk4F5WrvHhPpV5Bjw00NvsfRS669vv%2F1anSyFE%3D&reserved=0
##### INTERESTED IN PRESENTING? #####
Submissions of Practitioner presentation and poster proposals; proposals for workshops, panel sessions, and special sessions; as well as Academic Work-in-progress papers (for delivery as posters or as part of the doctoral colloquium) are being accepted until the late-round submission deadline of April 19, 2020. See the Call for Papers and Proposals at https://nam02.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fimmersivelrn.org%2Filrn2020%2Fcall-for-papers-proposals%2F&data=02%7C01%7Cpmiltenoff%40STCLOUDSTATE.EDU%7C18042fee4df246db0d4b08d7da283e4b%7C5011c7c60ab446ab9ef4fae74a921a7f%7C0%7C0%7C637217738689183646&sdata=LVkDtui3de5QKdg8Q2dCmox2xb%2F5Oo85HtQXfMuERdA%3D&reserved=0.
Proposals for the Immersive Learning Project Showcase & Competition may be submitted at https://nam02.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fimmersivelrn.org%2Filrn2020%2Fimmersive-learning-project-showcase%2F&data=02%7C01%7Cpmiltenoff%40STCLOUDSTATE.EDU%7C18042fee4df246db0d4b08d7da283e4b%7C5011c7c60ab446ab9ef4fae74a921a7f%7C0%7C0%7C637217738689183646&sdata=JH3PY8FL5hHvXkayKzS7mQLj3nmNoExzcQTnoBZp3yw%3D&reserved=0until April 30, 2020.
No further Academic Full and Short paper submissions are being considered at this stage.
##### INTERESTED IN VOLUNTEERING OR REVIEWING? #####
A range of volunteer opportunities are available, including conference internships for undergraduate and graduate students. Some of the roles currently available include session chair/facilitator, moderator, audio-visual/technical support, virtual event greeter/usher, virtual event photographer, virtual event videographer/livestreamer, 2D artist / illustrator
3D artist / modeler, graphic designer, and general conference intern. For details and to apply for one or more of these roles, please visit https://nam02.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fimmersivelrn.org%2Filrn2020%2Fvolunteer-opportunities&data=02%7C01%7Cpmiltenoff%40STCLOUDSTATE.EDU%7C18042fee4df246db0d4b08d7da283e4b%7C5011c7c60ab446ab9ef4fae74a921a7f%7C0%7C0%7C637217738689183646&sdata=MDe2N4jth2anSyTR3cpHwoH8zdwlxCbS8JZmJheWTJc%3D&reserved=0
Expressions of interest are also being solicited from scholars and practitioners wishing to join the iLRN 2020 Program Committee to peer review papers and proposals received in the late submission round (closing April 19, 2020). The late-round submissions will be no longer than 3 pages in length, and each Program Committee member will be asked to review no more than two submissions.
##### INTERESTED IN SPONSORING OR EXHIBITING? #####
A number of sponsorship and exhibition opportunities are available for organizations to:
– Meet and interact with key educational stakeholders
– Showcase their products and services
– Connect and collaborate with top researchers / scientists
– Build and strengthen customer / client relationships.
Packages range from US$500 for a basic virtual exhibit booth to US$15,000 for an exclusive Gold Sponsorship.
For information about the packages available, visit https://nam02.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fimmersivelrn.org%2Filrn2020%2Fsponsorships-and-exhibitions&data=02%7C01%7Cpmiltenoff%40STCLOUDSTATE.EDU%7C18042fee4df246db0d4b08d7da283e4b%7C5011c7c60ab446ab9ef4fae74a921a7f%7C0%7C0%7C637217738689183646&sdata=3M7ADMO9NDE51rrmC5ycoy8RgL0Y%2BnPyH1DW%2F45xRNc%3D&reserved=0
##### INTERESTED IN JOINING ILRN? (FREE) #####
Basic individual membership of the Immersive Learning Research Network is currently free; you can sign up at https://nam02.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fimmersivelrn.org%2Fget-involved%2Fmembership%2F&data=02%7C01%7Cpmiltenoff%40STCLOUDSTATE.EDU%7C18042fee4df246db0d4b08d7da283e4b%7C5011c7c60ab446ab9ef4fae74a921a7f%7C0%7C0%7C637217738689183646&sdata=nZg7GBgGiaozJ2l7GNM8b42v%2FnxQvv73F4CrfIqRMkw%3D&reserved=0.
Fee-based premium individual memberships and organizational memberships will be introduced in the near future.
##### CONTACT #####
Email: conference@immersivelrn.org
Web: https://nam02.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fimmersivelrn.org%2Filrn2020&data=02%7C01%7Cpmiltenoff%40STCLOUDSTATE.EDU%7C18042fee4df246db0d4b08d7da283e4b%7C5011c7c60ab446ab9ef4fae74a921a7f%7C0%7C0%7C637217738689183646&sdata=fcCXlkfgohdTjaitYkgcZmZp73cdd0ylUt%2FgMFiwAQk%3D&reserved=0

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more about Educators in VR in this IMS blog
https://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=educators+in+vr

Tips and Tools for Teaching Remotely

Tips and Tools for Teaching Remotely

Link to the list here: https://docs.google.com/document/d/e/2PACX-1vQ4sGwNQ2JEV-DAPIDIuy7UhxUErEP8IovilhSFAPTOZxMpWCxEZwMZeKzF-ad1tt_Ck7WSFivWjaWs/pub

Contact pmiltenoff@stcloudstate.edu if you need more info/support, clarifications. E.g. among the great tools in the list is EdPuzzle (https://edpuzzle.com/). EdPuzzle does very much the same as the Video Quiz in the MinnState MediaSpace (aka Kaltura); we can help you figure out advantages and disadvantages of the tools, their pedagogical application and make final choice.

Tips and Tools for Teaching Remotely – A PDF Handout

Algorithmic Test Proctoring

Our Bodies Encoded: Algorithmic Test Proctoring in Higher Education

SHEA SWAUGER ED-TECH

https://hybridpedagogy.org/our-bodies-encoded-algorithmic-test-proctoring-in-higher-education/

While in-person test proctoring has been used to combat test-based cheating, this can be difficult to translate to online courses. Ed-tech companies have sought to address this concern by offering to watch students take online tests, in real time, through their webcams.

Some of the more prominent companies offering these services include ProctorioRespondusProctorUHonorLockKryterion Global Testing Solutions, and Examity.

Algorithmic test proctoring’s settings have discriminatory consequences across multiple identities and serious privacy implications. 

While racist technology calibrated for white skin isn’t new (everything from photography to soap dispensers do this), we see it deployed through face detection and facial recognition used by algorithmic proctoring systems.

While some test proctoring companies develop their own facial recognition software, most purchase software developed by other companies, but these technologies generally function similarly and have shown a consistent inability to identify people with darker skin or even tell the difference between Chinese people. Facial recognition literally encodes the invisibility of Black people and the racist stereotype that all Asian people look the same.

As Os Keyes has demonstrated, facial recognition has a terrible history with gender. This means that a software asking students to verify their identity is compromising for students who identify as trans, non-binary, or express their gender in ways counter to cis/heteronormativity.

These features and settings create a system of asymmetric surveillance and lack of accountability, things which have always created a risk for abuse and sexual harassment. Technologies like these have a long history of being abused, largely by heterosexual men at the expense of women’s bodies, privacy, and dignity.

Their promotional messaging functions similarly to dog whistle politics which is commonly used in anti-immigration rhetoric. It’s also not a coincidence that these technologies are being used to exclude people not wanted by an institution; biometrics and facial recognition have been connected to anti-immigration policies, supported by both Republican and Democratic administrations, going back to the 1990’s.

Borrowing from Henry A. Giroux, Kevin Seeber describes the pedagogy of punishment and some of its consequences in regards to higher education’s approach to plagiarism in his book chapter “The Failed Pedagogy of Punishment: Moving Discussions of Plagiarism beyond Detection and Discipline.”

my note: I am repeating this for years
Sean Michael Morris and Jesse Stommel’s ongoing critique of Turnitin, a plagiarism detection software, outlines exactly how this logic operates in ed-tech and higher education: 1) don’t trust students, 2) surveil them, 3) ignore the complexity of writing and citation, and 4) monetize the data.

Technological Solutionism

Cheating is not a technological problem, but a social and pedagogical problem.
Our habit of believing that technology will solve pedagogical problems is endemic to narratives produced by the ed-tech community and, as Audrey Watters writes, is tied to the Silicon Valley culture that often funds it. Scholars have been dismantling the narrative of technological solutionism and neutrality for some time now. In her book “Algorithms of Oppression,” Safiya Umoja Noble demonstrates how the algorithms that are responsible for Google Search amplify and “reinforce oppressive social relationships and enact new modes of racial profiling.”

Anna Lauren Hoffmann, who coined the term “data violence” to describe the impact harmful technological systems have on people and how these systems retain the appearance of objectivity despite the disproportionate harm they inflict on marginalized communities.

This system of measuring bodies and behaviors, associating certain bodies and behaviors with desirability and others with inferiority, engages in what Lennard J. Davis calls the Eugenic Gaze.

Higher education is deeply complicit in the eugenics movement. Nazism borrowed many of its ideas about racial purity from the American school of eugenics, and universities were instrumental in supporting eugenics research by publishing copious literature on it, establishing endowed professorships, institutes, and scholarly societies that spearheaded eugenic research and propaganda.

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more on privacy in this IMS blog
https://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=privacy

Keep the Crashers Out of Your Zoom

https://blog.zoom.us/wordpress/2020/03/20/keep-the-party-crashers-from-crashing-your-zoom-event/

How to Keep the Crashers Out of Your Zoom Event

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How to Secure Your Zoom Meetings from Zoom-Bombing Attacks

https://www.bleepingcomputer.com/news/software/how-to-secure-your-zoom-meetings-from-zoom-bombing-attacks/

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Maybe we shouldn’t use Zoom after all

he Intercept reported that Zoom video calls are not end-to-end encrypted, despite the company’s claims that they are.

Motherboard reports that Zoom is leaking the email addresses of “at least a few thousand” people because personal addresses are treated as if they belong to the same company

Apple was forced to step in to secure millions of Macs after a security researcher found Zoom failed to disclose that it installed a secret web server on users’ Macs, which Zoom failed to remove when the client was uninstalled

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‘Zoom is malware’: why experts worry about the video conferencing platform

https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2020/apr/02/zoom-technology-security-coronavirus-video-conferencing

security researchers have called Zoom “a privacy disaster” and “fundamentally corrupt” as allegations of the company mishandling user data snowball.

A report from Motherboard found Zoom sends data from users of its iOS app to Facebook for advertising purposes, even if the user does not have a Facebook account.
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Zoom’s security and privacy problems are snowballing from r/technology

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this Tweet threads informative:

Dos and Don’ts of Online Video Meetings

From setting a clear agenda to testing your tech setup, here’s how to make video calls more tolerable for you and your colleagues.

The Zoom app, for example, has a setting that lets hosts see if you have switched away from the Zoom app for more than 30 seconds — a dead giveaway that you aren’t paying attention.

Emergency Remote Teaching and Online Learning

The Difference Between Emergency Remote Teaching and Online Learning

 Published:

https://er.educause.edu/articles/2020/3/the-difference-between-emergency-remote-teaching-and-online-learning

Moving instruction online can enable the flexibility of teaching and learning anywhere, anytime, but the speed with which this move to online instruction is expected to happen is unprecedented and staggering.

“Online learning” will become a politicized term that can take on any number of meanings depending on the argument someone wants to advance.

Online learning carries a stigma of being lower quality than face-to-face learning, despite research showing otherwise. These hurried moves online by so many institutions at once could seal the perception of online learning as a weak option

Researchers in educational technology, specifically in the subdiscipline of online and distance learning, have carefully defined terms over the years to distinguish between the highly variable design solutions that have been developed and implemented: distance learning, distributed learning, blended learning, online learning, mobile learning, and others. Yet an understanding of the important differences has mostly not diffused beyond the insular world of educational technology and instructional design researchers and professionals.

Online learning design options (moderating variables)

  • Modality
    • Fully online
    • Blended (over 50% online)
    • Blended (25–50% online)
    • Web-enabled F2F

    Pacing

    • Self-paced (open entry, open exit)
    • Class-paced
    • Class-paced with some self-paced

    Student-Instructor Ratio

    • < 35 to 1
    • 36–99 to 1
    • 100–999 to 1
    • > 1,000 to 1

    Pedagogy

    • Expository
    • Practice
    • Exploratory
    • Collaborative

    Role of Online Assessments

    • Determine if student is ready for new content
    • Tell system how to support the student (adaptive instruction)
    • Provide student or teacher with information about learning state
    • Input to grade
    • Identify students at risk of failure
  • Instructor Role Online
    • Active instruction online
    • Small presence online
    • None

    Student Role Online

    • Listen or read
    • Complete problems or answer questions
    • Explore simulation and resources
    • Collaborate with peers

    Online Communication Synchrony

    • Asynchronous only
    • Synchronous only
    • Some blend of both

    Source of Feedback

    • Automated
    • Teacher
    • Peers
Source: Content adapted from Barbara Means, Marianne Bakia, and Robert Murphy, Learning Online: What Research Tells Us about Whether, When and How (New York: Routledge, 2014).
Typical planning, preparation, and development time for a fully online university course is six to nine months before the course is delivered. Faculty are usually more comfortable teaching online by the second or third iteration of their online courses.
In contrast to experiences that are planned from the beginning and designed to be online, emergency remote teaching (ERT) is a temporary shift of instructional delivery to an alternate delivery mode due to crisis circumstances. It involves the use of fully remote teaching solutions for instruction or education that would otherwise be delivered face-to-face or as blended or hybrid courses and that will return to that format once the crisis or emergency has abated.
A full-course development project can take months when done properly. The need to “just get it online” is in direct contradiction to the time and effort normally dedicated to developing a quality course. Online courses created in this way should not be mistaken for long-term solutions but accepted as a temporary solution to an immediate problem.

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More on online learning in this IMS blog
https://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=online+learning

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