Archive of ‘gamification’ category

Credly Badges on Canvas

Credly Badges Now Available Through Canvas

By Rhea Kelly 01/09/17

https://campustechnology.com/articles/2017/01/09/credly-badges-now-available-through-canvas.aspx

Students can now earn digital badges when they complete modules in Canvas, thanks to a new partnership between Credly and the learning management system from Instructure.

“Digital badges are a powerful and employer-friendly complement to grades and other information traditionally found on a college transcript,” said Brenda Perea, instructional design project manager at Colorado Community College System, which deployed an early pilot of Credly Learning Edition for Canvas.

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more on badges in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=badges

IWB market grows

Interactive Whiteboard Market to See Resurgence in the Face of Skepticism, Disdain

By Richard Chang 12/20/16\

https://thejournal.com/articles/2016/12/20/global-interactive-whiteboard-market-to-grow-7-percent-through-2020.aspx

The global interactive whiteboard (IWB) market is expected to make a comeback and grow at a compound annual growth rate of almost 7 percent from 2016 through 2020, according to a recent report issued by London-based tech market research firm Technavio.

Respondents to THE Journal’s two recent surveys, the 2016 Readers’ Choice Awards and “Teaching with Technology,” expressed both positive and negative sentiments about interactive whiteboards.

And according to THE Journal’s “Teaching with Technology” survey published in September, 68 percent of teachers who responded use interactive whiteboards in the classroom, while 8 percent have IWBs on their wish list, and 4 percent will be using them within one year. At the same time, however, 20 percent of respondents said that IWBs would be dead and gone within the next decade, ranking second only to desktop computers

In addition to blended learning, which includes gamification, social learning and bring-your-own-device (BYOD) policies, Technavio analysts highlighted the following factors that are contributing to the growth of the IWB market:

  • Technological advancements;
  • Need for experimental learning; and
  • Enhanced compatibility with digital content.

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more on interactive white boards in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=interactive+boards

cartoons humor learning

Creating Cartoons to Spark Engagement, Learning

http://www.toondoo.com/

my note:
Avoid using infographics for purposes, which toodoo can serve.
Infographics are for about visualization of stats, not just visualization.
#FindTheRightTool
By Vicki E. Phillips
As instructors, we are constantly looking for new ways to capture our students’ attention and increase their participation in our classes, especially in the online modalities. We spend countless hours crafting weekly announcements for classes and then inevitably receive multiple emails from our students asking the very same questions that we so carefully and completely answered in those very same announcements! The question remains, how do we get them to read our posts?
It was precisely that problem I was trying to solve when I came across several articles touting the benefits of comics in higher education classrooms. I knew I couldn’t create an entire comic book, but I wondered if I could create a content-related cartoon that would not only capture students’ attention and maybe make them laugh, but also interest them enough that they would read the entire announcement or post. In doing so, I would be freed from responding to dozens of emails asking the same questions outlined in the announcements and students could focus on the homework.
A quick Internet search led me to a plethora of free “click and drag” cartoon making software applications to try. I started posting my own cartoons on characters, themes, etc. on the weekly literature we were studying in my upper division American and Contemporary World Literature classes, as well as to offer reminders or a few words of encouragement. Here’s an example of one I posted during week 7 of the semester when students can become discouraged with their assignment load: http://www.toondoo.com/cartoon/10115361
After a positive response, I decided to provide my online students the opportunity to try their hand at cartoon creation. I created a rubric and a set of instructions for an easy to use, free program that I had used, and I opened up the “cartoon challenge” to the students. The results were nothing short of amazing—what intrigued me the most was the time and effort they took with their cartoons. Not only did they create cartoons on the story we were reading, but they also wrote additional posts explaining their ideas for the creation, discussing why they chose a particular scene, and identifying those elements pertinent to the points they were making. These posts tended to receive many more substantial comments from their peers than the traditional discussion board posts, indicating they were being read more.
When students in my face-to-face course heard about the cartoons, they asked to try this approach as well. Their cartoons, shared in class via the overhead projector, led to some of the most engaging and interesting discussions I have ever had in the residential literature classes as students explained how they came up with the elements they chose, and why they picked a certain scene from the reading. The positive student feedback has been instrumental in my continuing to offer this option in both my online and face-to-face classes.
How does one get started in making these cartoons? The good news is you do not have to be an artist to make a cartoon! There are free programs with templates, clip art, and all the elements you would need to click and drag into place all those wonderful ideas you have simmering in your brain. My favorite to use is ToonDoo, available at http://toondoo.com. I like it because there are literally hundreds of elements, a search bar, and it lets me customize what I want to say in the dialog bubbles. It is very user friendly, even for those of us with limited artistic ability.
The whole experience has been overwhelmingly positive for me, and judging from the feedback received, for the students as well. It has also reminded me of one of my teaching goals, which is to incorporate more activities which would fall under assimilating and creating aspects of Bloom’s Taxonomy (Bloom’s Revised Taxonomy, 2001). If that is your goal as well, then try inserting a cartoon in those weekly announcements and ask for feedback from your students—I think you’ll be pleasantly surprised!
References:
Armstrong, Patricia (n.d.) Bloom’s Taxonomy, Vanderbilt University, Center for Teaching. Retrieved from https://cft.vanderbilt.edu/guides-sub-pages/blooms-taxonomy/#2001
Pappas, Christopher (2014) The 5 Best Free Cartoon Making Programs for Teachers. Retrieved from: https://elearningindustry.com/the-5-best-free-cartoon-making-tools-for-teachers
Vicki E. Phillips is an assistant professor of English and Literature at Rasmussen College, Ocala, Fla.

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more on effective presentations in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=presentations

more on create infographics in this IMS blog:
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2014/04/09/infographics-how-to-create-them/

instagram best social media

Shipley, K. (2016, December 19). Why Instagram is the Best Social Media App of 2016 and Possibly 2017. Retrieved December 20, 2016, from https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/why-instagram-best-social-media-app-2016-possibly-2017-shipley

Instagram positioned itself as the third most popular social media app and the best social media app of 2016.

Twitter saw a decrease in users over the past year and even death of their beloved 6-second video-clip sharing app, Vine.

In an article entitled ‘Why Vine Died,’ Casey Newman reported the following, “Former executives say that a major competitive challenged emerged in the form of Instagram, which introduced 15-second video clips in June 2013.

Instagram remained stable with the introduction of new features like stories and video channels, resources of it’s parent company, Facebook, and the introduction of ads to the platform that look very similar to the posts in a user’s feed.

In addition to a total logo redesign, Instagram shifted its focus from just pictures, to longer video (from 15 sec. to one minute) and direct messaging features, such as group posts and disappearing video. Explore Channels in Discover let people discover new photo and video content based on interests. Instagram Stories added a new element to the Instagram experience showing highlights from friends, celebrities and businesses one follows without interfering with their feed. Instagram also caters to business needs through its Instagram for Business platform that allows for instant contact, detailed analytics and easy-to-follow linked content.

Most recently, Instagram released live video in their stories feature. Users can start a live stream in their Instagram story and view comments and feedback from their viewers in real time! This feature is similar to apps like musical.ly and live.ly which has over 80 million users and 62% of its users are under 21.

#StudentVoices #MillennialMondays #WhatToWatch

#MillennialMondays is a new series that aims to discuss relevant topics on careers and business from a millennial perspective.

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more on instagram in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=instagram

interactive historical map

Chronas – Interactive Historical Map and Data Sets

http://www.freetech4teachers.com/2015/12/chronas-interactive-history-map-and.html

http://chronas.org/history

My note: it is not about history ONLY, it is about gamifying your lesson plan.

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more on history in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=history
more on digital storytelling in this IMS blog:
https://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=digital+storytelling
more on gamification in this IMS blog
https://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=gamification

mobile learning tips

Tap into These 5 Tips for Mobile Learning

A master in mobile learning shares his best advice for rebooting your instruction.

By Dian Schaffhauser 12/13/16

https://campustechnology.com/articles/2016/12/13/tap-into-these-5-tips-for-mobile-learning.aspx

1) Find Out What Devices Are Really in Use

instructors have to take device choices into consideration when they’re choosing apps

2) Teach Not Just for Consumption but for Curation

Students use their phones to capture video or audio interviews and post them to Twitter’s live streaming service, Periscope, at various times throughout the course.

3) Try Texting for Exam Review

As an alternative, he began texting review questions every few hours for the next exam and found that he was getting a “much higher frequency of interaction.” Teacher Text, as he called it, never supplied the answers, just questions — sometimes multiple choice and other times open-ended. To keep students’ interest, he’d use at least a few of those questions on the actual test. “They’re going to be more inclined to pay attention to every question because I may give them 50 questions of review and have four or five of those on the test,” he said.

The result: “Grades started to climb pretty quickly.”

4) Perform Safe Texting, but Try It Everywhere

adopted remind from iKeepSafe, a free service that provides an interface between the teacher and the students for the purposes of texting. The tool has simplified the process of instructor texting, a practice that has overall helped students “to feel more connected.”

5) Fit Your Mobile Approach to Your Subject

[flashcard apps] like Quizlet and StudyBlue that can replicate the ongoing study or rehearsal of learning

might stream a quick lesson on the fly through Periscope or hold a 15-minute class discussion through a chat on Twitter.

“I’ll just say, ‘Here’s my hashtag, and I’m going to be live here at 9 to 9:15 p.m. Central time,'” he explained. He typically intends to broadcast a question about every five minutes and allow people to respond. “It’s interesting. You shoot out one question and you get bombarded. People are putting resources in there. In 15 minutes, I’ve barely gotten two questions off. But they have the hashtag and they can go back and harvest the resources that other people put up.”

6) Channel Your Students

Speak the language your learners listen in.’

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more on mobile learning in this IMS blog:
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=mobile+learning

more on curation in this blog:
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=curation

technologies to disappear

Top 10 Education Technologies that Will Be Dead and Gone in the Next Decade

In our 2016 Teaching with Technology survey, faculty members offered their predictions on what the future holds for technology in teaching — including what hardware and systems will bite the dust over the next 10 years.

By Dian Schaffhauser, Rhea Kelly 11/02/16

https://campustechnology.com/articles/2016/11/02/top-10-education-technologies-that-will-be-dead-and-gone-in-the-next-decade.aspx

 

top ten ed technologies will be dead next decade

top ten ed tech that faculty wish to be dead

will technology play a role

top ten tech ed that will be important

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more on tech trends in education in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=tech+trends

VR, AR and IoT beyond Second Life

VR, AR, and the Internet of Things: Life Beyond Second Life

https://campustechnology.com/Articles/2016/12/06/Life-Beyond-Second-Life-VR-AR-IoT.aspx

But it gets even more interesting when virtual and augmented reality meet the Internet of Things

when Second Life began, there was a lot of interest, but the toolset was limited — just because of the timeframe, not that the toolset wasn’t a good one for that period. But, things matured. I think it was, in particular, the ability to work in HD that improved things a lot. Then came the ability to bring in datasets — creating dashboards and ways for people to access other data that they could bring into the virtual reality experiment. I think those two things were real forces for change.

A dashboard could pop up, and you could select among several tools, and you could get a feed from somewhere on the Internet — maybe a video or a presentation. And you can use these things as you move through this hyper reality: The datasets you select can be manipulated and be part of the entire experience.

So, the hyper reality experience became deeper, richer with tools and data via the IoT; and with HD it became more real.

We can’t deny the fact that curriculum and the way we teach is becoming unbundled. Some things are going to happen online and in the virtual space, and other things will happen in the classroom. And the expense of education is going to drive how we operate. Virtual reality tools, augmented reality tools, and visualization tools can offer experiences that can be mass-produced and sent out to lots of students, machine to machine, at a lower cost. Virtual field trips and other kinds of virtual learning experiences will become much more commonplace in the next 5 years.

 

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more on VR in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=VR

grant for VR

Iowa District to Use $54K Google Grant for VR Hardware

By Sri Ravipati 11/29/16

https://thejournal.com/articles/2016/11/29/iowa-district-to-use-$54k-google-grant-for-vr-hardware.aspx

Council Bluffs Community School District (CBCSD) in Council Bluffs, IA has received a $54,500 grant from Google’s Charitable Giving Fund of the Tides Foundation. With the funding, the district will purchase 28 kits (each with 15 headsets) that cost about $4,500 per kit, according to a report from the Omaha World-Herald and other sources.

The hardware will enable teachers to incorporate VR into their curriculum, like VR tours on Google Expeditions, Alchemy VR, Discovery VR, zSpace and other platforms.

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more on VR in this IMS blog:
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=VR

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