Archive of ‘gamification’ category

Teach like a pirate

Burgess, D. (2012). Teach like a pirate: Increase student engagement, boost your creativity, and transform your life as an educator. San Diego, Calif.: Dave Burgess Consulting, Inc..

Riddell, R. (2018, February 1). FETC: How can administrators ensure digital-age classrooms are best serving learners? Retrieved February 2, 2018, from https://www.educationdive.com/news/fetc-how-can-administrators-ensure-digital-age-classrooms-are-best-serving/516059/
his switch flipped when he learned more about why students like to play games. Games, he said, provide an environment where we get to try without penalty because failure is part of the journey. Everyone can be a hero, and games are goal-oriented and provide, in some ways, a representation of the world students want to be a part of. They’re social and provide positive stress.

TeacherGaming

TeacherGaming Raises $1.6M to Grow Subscription-Based Classroom Gaming Platform

Jan 30, 2018

https://www.edsurge.com/news/2018-01-30-teachergaming-raises-1-6m-to-grow-subscription-based-classroom-gaming-platform

TeacherGaming is a subscription-based suite of educational games for the classroom, ranging from $150 to $1150 per year depending on class size. The system includes lesson plans and an analytics platform for educators to track student activity and progress.

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More on gaming in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=gaming

more on MInecraft in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=minecraft

Patches VR

Patches – Create Your Own Virtual Reality Environments

http://www.freetech4teachers.com/2018/01/patches-create-your-own-virtual-reality.html

In addition toGoogle’s Cardboard Camera and Street View apps as tools for creating simple virtual reality imagery

Patches is a free online tool for creating virtual reality scenes. Patches offers animated characters, animals, buildings, and common objects that you can place inside a virtual reality scene. Just drag and drop objects and animations

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more on VR in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=virtual+reality

SOE workshop gamificaiton

School of Education workshop on gaming and gamification

Outline:
The Gamification of the educations process is not a new concept. The advent of educational technologies, however, makes the idea timely and pertinent. In short 60 min, we will introduce the concept of gamification of the educational process and discuss real-live examples.

Learning Outcomes:

  • at the end of the session, participants will have an idea about gaming and gamification in education and will be able to discriminate between those two power concepts in education
  • at the end of this session, participants will be able search and select VIdeo 360 movies for their class lessons
  • at the end of the session, participants will be able to understand the difference between VR, AR and MR.

if you are interested in setting up a makespace and/or similar gaming space at your school, please contact me after this workshop for more information

  1. Gaming in education
    Minecraft.edu
    http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2017/10/26/pedagogically-sound-minecraft-examples/
    Simcity.com
  2. Gamification in education
    1. How would you define gamification of the educational process?
    2. Gaming and Gamification in academic and library settings (paper)
      Short URL: http://scsu.mn/1F008Re
      Gamification takes game elements (such as points, badges, leaderboards, competition, achievements) and applies them to a non-game setting. It has the potential to turn routine, mundane tasks into refreshing, motivating experiences (What is GBL (Game-Based Learning)?, n.d.).
      Gamification is defined as the process of applying game mechanics and game thinking to the real world to solve problems and engage users (Phetteplace & Felker, 2014, p. 19; Becker, 2013, p. 199; Kapp, 2012). Gamification requires three sets of principles: 1. Empowered Learners, 2. Problem Solving, 3. Understanding (Gee, 2005).
    3. Apply gamification tactics to existing learning task
      split in groups and develop a plan to gamify existing learning task
    4. gamification with and without technology
  3. Video 360 in the classroom
    1. the importance of Video 360
      p. 46 Virtual Reality
      http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2017/08/30/nmc-horizon-report-2017-k12/
      p. 47 Google is bringing VR to UK kids
      http://www.wired.co.uk/article/google-digital-skills-vr-pledge
      Video 360 movies for education:
      http://virtualrealityforeducation.com/google-cardboard-vr-videos/science-vr-apps/
      Watch this movie on the big screen:

      from the web page above, choose a movie or click on this lin
      k:
      https://youtu.be/nOHM8gnin8Y (to watch a black hole in video 360)
      Open the link on your phone and insert the phone in Google Cardboard. Watch the video using Google Cardboard. 
    2. Discuss the difference between in your experience watching the movie on the big screen and using Google Cardboard. What are the advantages of using goggles, such as Google Cardboard?
  4. VR, AR, MR and Video 360.
    1. discuss your ideas

 

digital badging

Learning, Engaging, Enhancing with Digital Badging

Friday, September 29, 2017https://er.educause.edu/blogs/2017/9/learning-engaging-enhancing-with-digital-badging

The Integrated Advising and Planning for Student Success or ‘iPASS’ grant has been funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation; it supports the transformation of advising and student services in higher ed through the redesign of structures, processes, and technologies. To date, this work is ongoing in 26 grantee institutions across the country.

created and delivered our Series on Excellence in Advising through iPASS as a semi self-paced online course to ensure the broadest access possible to all grantees.

 

SpringboardVR and Steam in libraries

Springboard Vr and Steam for virtual reality in libraries

A bit more information from SpringboardVR for anyone interested:
Here is a link to their setup guide – https://docs.google.com/document/d/1dYp4-hoHcJD3I8_YdyNh8PI-4CFvkWfVT3HJ-NK6FvY/edit
It is currently built specifically for arcades, but they think there are a lot of features that libraries could still find useful.
They also have a booking system:
https://docs.google.com/document/d/14-HvD-F1Kt7aTrlwiKdq8aXouU5d4l0lszPo6TwlM1w/edit

I heard back from Steam, with exactly the response I expected: Our service model (users reserve our own PC and VR headset, using our Steam software) needs to use their site license program. And even if it’s just on that one PC, we’d still have to run their site license server locally to manage it.

We did an inventory of what it would cost us to purchase a site license for our most popular games: Of our top 25 most played VR games, only 10 have site licenses available at all. Those 10 games would in total cost us slightly more than $3000 per year to license, which strikes me as ridiculous.

But Tara, thanks for pointing out Springboard VR! At a glance it looks really promising. I’m really glad to hear about another option.

-Chad

We ran into the same problem last year with Steam. However, we are now working with Springboard VR. Our head VR specialist says you can test run their interface on a machine for free and that they are putting together an academic package that should be available soon!  https://springboardvr.com/
Tara
Amazing timing, Laura! I was just looking into the site license program this week. I wrote up what I’ve learned so far for someone else this morning, shared below. But to sum up, it’s not very promising either from a financial or practical view of the way we use Steam currently (one PC with Steam titles that we’ve purchased under our account, with an attached HTC Vive).
I originally thought this was just a different kind of license for each game, one which allows public use in a library, cafe, etc. But I got some clarification questions answered by Steam support – it’s actually designed for users to log into one of our computers using their own Steam account. They can then check out a game we’ve purchased a site license for, and play it under their account while they’re on our computer.
 
This also requires running some sort of server locally to handle the checkouts.
 
So I don’t think this is going to work for us. The pricing is also pretty wild. One of our most popular titles is Space Pirate Trainer – currently $10 paid one time to own individually, or $30/month/seat for a site license subscription. And I’ve seen at least one title that’s free for individual ownership, but somehow costs $20/month/seat for site license.
 
Much of their documentation is contradictory and out of date.
 
Even more annoying is that you can’t even see the site license prices until you sign up for a site license account and fill out some legal forms.
 
Last but not least, many titles, even free ones, do not have site licenses available at all.
 
I have one more request into Steam support asking how they prefer we purchase things as a library. I’ll let you know what I hear.
 
Oh, also – you can’t convert an existing Steam account or purchases. You need to create a new one and start from scratch.
 
-Chad
We’d also like to know if any other libraries had set up the Steam/Valve Site license, which we were just starting to look into ourselves:  https://support.steampowered.com/kb_article.php?ref=3303-QWRC-3436  – which sounds like it solves many of these problems. Our general counsel has a few issues with the license terms but are willing to consider especially if I can find examples of other institutions utilizing it!
 
____________________________________________________________________
Laura K. Wiegand
Interim University Librarian
Associate Director Library Information Technology and Digital Strategies
Echoing what Peter said there are no good solutions right now.  It would be great if Steam or HTC or Oculus offered site licenses or group accounts, but they don’t.  We have 2 HTC Vives that share an account.  This causes problems occasionally as it doesn’t like it if two headsets are using the same program.  Going offline usually takes care of it.  Our 4 Oculus Rifts also share an account but the Oculus store is less problematic than Steam since it only contacts the mother ship when doing an update.  If you have the option prepaid cards and individual accounts would be the best way to go but our purchasing department said no.
Edward Iglesias
In our library’s VR Studio, we have a separate library-owned Steam account for each of 7 VR workstation computers. Some have Vives, some have Oculus Rifts at them. We purchase content for each account. We also allow patrons to download free games/tools to those computers.
If a patron owns Steam content that we don’t, they may log in to their personal account and download the game to our computer. So far, this hasn’t posed a problem, except that the added game will show up in that workstation account’s game list, but will not be playable to other patrons. I occasionally delete personal games that are causing confusion to other patrons.  Not too many patrons have downloaded content yet so if it gets to be too troublesome we may disallow it in the future.
For the Oculus Rift stations, there is a Steam account as mentioned above, plus the Oculus library. For Oculus, I’ve been able to use one account for all of the workstations. We purchase content once and it’s usable on all the computers from the one account. This has worked fine so far except for playing multi-player online. The single account will not support multiple instances of online play for the same game.
None of these is a perfect solution but they are mostly working as this is a continuous work in progress. Feel free to get in touch off list if you’d like more specific info, etc.
Thanks,
Pete
Hi all,
I was curious if any of your libraries have Steam from Valve installed on your public workstations to drive PC gaming and an HTC Vive? Any tips on how to set that up? Obviously the licensing issue with purchased programs/games through Steam is a problem when you are providing access for a large user base. There are multiple free games/programs available.
How do you handle providing each user with HDD/SSD space on your machines for downloaded games/programs through Steam?
Thanks,
Alex
Elisandro Cabada
Engineering and Innovation Liaison Librarian
Computer Science, Electrical and Computer Engineering Librarian

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more on Virtual Reality in libraries in this IMS blog
https://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=virtual+reality+library

VR and students with special needs

Bibliography on virtual reality and students with physical and cognitive disabilities

Jeffs, T. L. (2009). Virtual Reality and Special Needs. Themes In Science And Technology Education2(1-2), 253-268.

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Lahav, O., Sharkey, P., & Merrick, J. (2014). Virtual and augmented reality environments for people with special needs. International Journal Of Child Health And Human Development7(4), 337-338.

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Cai, Y., Chiew, R., Nay, Z. T., Indhumathi, C., & Huang, L. (2017). Design and development of VR learning environments for children with ASD. Interactive Learning Environments25(8), 1098-1109. doi:10.1080/10494820.2017.1282877

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Passig, D. (2011). The Impact of Immersive Virtual Reality on Educators’ Awareness of the Cognitive Experiences of Pupils with Dyslexia. Teachers College Record113(1), 181-204.

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Ke, F., & Im, T. (2013). Virtual-Reality-Based Social Interaction Training for Children with High-Functioning Autism. Journal Of Educational Research106(6), 441-461. doi:10.1080/00220671.2013.832999

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Collins, J., Hoermann, S., & Regenbrecht, H. (2016). Comparing a finger dexterity assessment in virtual, video-mediated, and unmediated reality. International Journal Of Child Health And Human Development9(3), 333-341.

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Epure, P., Gheorghe, C., Nissen, T., Toader, L. O., Macovei, A. N., Nielsen, S. M., & … Brooks, E. P. (2016). Effect of the Oculus Rift head mounted display on postural stability. International Journal Of Child Health And Human Development9(3), 343-350.

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Sánchez, J., & Espinoza, M. (2016). Usability and redesign of a university entrance test based on audio for learners who are blind. International Journal Of Child Health And Human Development9(3), 379-387.

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Rizzo, A. A., Bowerly, T., Shahabi, C., Buckwalter, J. G., Klimchuk, D., & Mitura, R. (2004). Diagnosing Attention Disorders in a Virtual Classroom. Computer (00189162)37(6), 87-89.

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Eden, S. (2008). The effect of 3D virtual reality on sequential time perception among deaf and hard-of-hearing children. European Journal Of Special Needs Education23(4), 349-363. doi:10.1080/08856250802387315

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Eden, S., & Bezer, M. (2011). Three-dimensions vs. two-dimensions intervention programs: the effect on the mediation level and behavioural aspects of children with intellectual disability. European Journal Of Special Needs Education26(3), 337-353. doi:10.1080/08856257.2011.593827

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Lorenzo, G., Lledó, A., Roig, R., Lorenzo, A., & Pomares, J. (2016). New Educational Challenges and Innovations: Students with Disability in Immersive Learning Environments. In Virtual Learning. InTech. https://doi.org/10.5772/65219

https://www.intechopen.com/books/virtual-learning/new-educational-challenges-and-innovations-students-with-disability-in-immersive-learning-environmen

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more on virtual reality in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=virtual+reality

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