Archive of ‘mobile learning’ category

Code in Place free Python course

Stanford University’s Computer Science department is holding a unique MOOC called ‘Code in Place.’ This is a free course to learn python. It is a live class environment and not a typical video-based curriculum. from r/programming

https://compedu.stanford.edu/codeinplace/announcement/

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more on Python in this IMS blog
https://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=python

lessons with interactive 3D

BUILD A LESSON PLAN USING INTERACTIVE 3D FOR A CHANCE TO WIN CASH PRIZES

Students love playing games like Fortnite. What if they could enjoy learning history, math, science, or social studies while they play and create?

Epic Games invites secondary school teachers to submit lesson plans that utilize interactive 3D technology to engage their students for a chance to win cash prizes up to $25,000. To enter the contest, submit a new or existing lesson plan that incorporates Fortnite CreativeTwinmotion, or Unreal Engine by May 31, 2020.

Lesson plans can cover any topic for ages 13 and up—whether that’s a core subject like history, math, or science, or vocational skills like game design, engineering, or urban planning. Need help teaching with real-time tools? We have so many resources and lesson plan examples to help you get started!

https://www.unrealengine.com/en-US/events/interactive-3d-contest

monitoring activities in Zoom

\Asking for a “friend,” does anyone know if on a Zoom call whether the host can tell if you’ve navigated to another window – i.e., multi-tasking? I’ve heard of teachers threatening students with this capability.

— Scott Kupor (@skupor) March 11, 2020

My note: From a pedagogical point of view, the bigger question is: does one (instructor) need to “big brother” students’ activities, in this case multi-tasking on another window.
Blast from the past:
https://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2017/04/03/use-of-laptops-in-the-classroom/ 
Here is the collection of opinions regarding a similar issue 15 years ago: do we have to let students use Internet-connected laptops in the class room and 5 years ago: can we let students use smart phones in the classroom.
The opinion i liked most and side with it: if we (the instructors) are not able to create arresting content and class presence, we should not blame students for straying away from our activities. It does not matter how much control Zoom will give us to “big brother” students, it is up to our teaching, not to the technology to keep students learning
#Gaming #gamification

F2F instruction preference

https://www.edsurge.com/news/2019-12-11-most-students-and-faculty-prefer-face-to-face-instruction-educause-surveys-find

studies from the EDUCAUSE Center for Analysis and Research. The first, published in October, surveyed more than 40,000 students at 118 U.S. institutions, while the second, published this week, drew on data from 9,500 faculty members across 119 US institutions.

Among student respondents, 70 percent said they prefer mostly or completely face-to-face learning environments. The professors surveyed were even more partial to face-to-face classes, with 73 percent preferring them.

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more on F2F in this IMS blog
https://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=f2f

phone camera for landscapes

https://www.cnet.com/how-to/how-to-take-amazing-landscape-photos-using-your-phones-camera

he latest crop of phones like the iPhone 1111 ProSamsung Galaxy S10 PlusOnePlus 7 Pro or Google Pixel 4

If your phone doesn’t have a built-in wide-angle mode (as you’ll find on the iPhone 11 ($699 at Amazon) series or Galaxy S10 Plus), you should take a look at Moment’s range of clip-on phone lenses, available for all recent iPhones, Galaxy phones, Pixels and OnePlus phones.

Moment also makes filter adapters for screw-in 62mm filters, such as polarizers, which can help reduce reflections on water or boost the blues in the sky. Filter adapters also let you use professional-quality square Lee Filters, which slide into a holder connected to the adapter via a 62mm adapter ring.

social media for good

9 ways real students use social media for good

Michael Niehoff  October 2, 2019

https://www.iste.org/explore/Digital-citizenship/9-ways-real-students-use-social-media-for-good

1.  Sharing tools and resources.

2.  Gathering survey data.

3. Collaborating with peers.

4. Participating in group work.

5. Communicating with teachers.

6. Researching careers.

7. Meeting with mentors and experts.

8. Showcasing student work.  

9. Creating digital portfolios.

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more about social media in education in this IMS blog
https://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=social+media+education

digitally native need computer help

The Smartphone Generation Needs Computer Help

Young people may be expert social-media and smartphone users, but many lack the digital skills they need for today’s jobs. How can we set them up for success?

https://www.theatlantic.com/sponsored/grow-google-2019/smartphone-generation-computer-help/3127/

Kenneth Cole’s classroom at the Boys & Girls Club of Dane County, located on a quiet residential street in Madison, Wisconsin.

The classes Cole teaches use Grow with Google’s Applied Digital Skills online curriculum.

One day he may lead Club members in a lesson on building digital resumes that can be customized quickly and make job-seeking easier when applying online. Another day they may create a blog. On this particular day, they drew up a budget for an upcoming event using a spreadsheet. For kids who are often glued to their smartphones, these types of digital tasks, surprisingly, can be new experiences.

The vast majority of young Americans have access to a smartphone, and nearly half say they are online “almost constantly.”

But although smartphones can be powerful learning tools when applied productively, these reports of hyperconnectivity and technological proficiency mask a deeper paucity of digital skills. This often-overlooked phenomenon is limiting some young people’s ability—particularly those in rural and low-income communities—to succeed in school and the workplace, where digital skills are increasingly required to collaborate effectively and complete everyday tasks.

According to a survey by Pew Research Center, only 17 percent of Americans are “digitally ready”—that is, confident using digital tools for learning. Meanwhile, in a separate study, American millennials ranked last among a group of their international peers when it came to “problem-solving in technology-rich environments,” such as sending and saving digital information

teach his sophomore pupils the technology skills they need in the workplace, as well as soft skills like teamwork.

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more on digitally native in this IMS blog
https://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=digitally+native
more on millennials in this IMS blog
https://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=millennials

E-learning Technologies

Science and Technology Resources on the Internet E-learning Technologies
April L. Colosimo Associate Librarian McGill University Library & Archives
McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada  april.colosimo@mcgill.ca
https://journals.library.ualberta.ca/istl/index.php/istl/article/view/24/66
https://www.merlot.org/merlot/viewCompositeReview.htm?id=1347947
The technologies section covers: learning environmentslearning objectsactivitiesgaming, and building community. The tools were selected to potentially enhance synchronous teaching, asynchronous teaching or blended classrooms. The focus is on open or freely available tools but whenever a cost is involved it is indicated.

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