Archive of ‘mobile learning’ category

7 Important Traits of a Great Mobile Learning App

http://blogs.kqed.org/mindshift/2010/12/7-important-traits-of-a-great-mobile-learning-app/

The best learning apps have the following attributes:

1) They’re interactive. Touchscreens beg for touching.

2) They’re designed for shorter playtimes.

3) They’re focused narrowly by age and relevant to what they’re learning and their motor skills.

4) They’re fun, engaging children by making them laugh — but too too much.

5) They’re inter-generational, allowing a way to involve parents.

6) They’re modifiable, giving kids options to personalize.

7) They have built-in goals, to keep kids coming back with incentives.

ECAR STUDY OF UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS AND INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY, 2013

Key Findings

See the 2013 report for a full list of key messages, findings, and supporting data.

  • Students recognize the value of technology but still need guidance when it comes to better using it for academics.
  • Students prefer blended learning environments while beginning to experiment with MOOCs.
  • Students are ready to use their mobile devices more for academics, and they look to institutions and instructors for opportunities and encouragement to do so.
  • Students value their privacy, and using technology to connect with them has its limits.
p. 10 students are generally confident in their prepraredness to use technology for course work, but those who are interested in more tech training favor “in calss” guidance over separate training options.

Educause’s ECAR Study, 2013

http://www.educause.edu/library/resources/ecar-study-undergraduate-students-and-information-technology-2013

Infographic:

http://net.educause.edu/ir/library/pdf/ERS1302/Eig1302.pdf

SPOC, swarm and MOOC

SPOC as the cousin of smartmobs (http://www.smartmobs.com/author/bryan/) and swarming (http://bwatwood.edublogs.org/2010/08/05/learning-swarms/)?… as per Bryan Alexander

Bryan Alexander forwarded the idea of swarming in education some 10 years go: synchronous online communication will break the brick-and-mortar classroom and must lead to offering a f2f class on a specific subject to “swarming” of interested students all around the globe around the specific subject. It was in an Educause article, which, of course, I cannot find now. The term comes from the 1999 riots in Seattle when protesters where calling each other on cells after the police hits them and were “swarming” to a different rally point.

Ah, there it is: http://www.educause.edu/ero/article/going-nomadic-mobile-learning-higher-education

—————-

Plamen Miltenoff, Ph.D., MLIS

 

From: Ewing, M Keith
Sent: Friday, September 27, 2013 11:55 AM
Subject: First MOOCs, now SPOCs

 

“Harvard plans to boldly go with ‘Spocs’”

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-24166247

SPOC = Small Private Online Course

Well, not so small and private—still large, but not thousands.

“The smaller class size will allow “much more rigorous assessment and greater validation of identity and that will be more closely tied to what kind of certification might be possible,” he [Prof Robert Lue] says.”

 

Keith Ewing

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