Archive of ‘pedagogy’ category

What is the difference between education and training?

per LinkedIn discussion: http://www.linkedin.com/groupAnswers?viewQuestionAndAnswers=&discussionID=5822757351727316994&gid=2038260&goback=%2Enmp_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1#commentID_null

What is the difference between education and training?

☆☆☆☆☆ Industrial Automation Training – Industrial Training software to Maintenance, Engineering, Manufacturing.Top Contributor

Schools and companies commonly use the word “Training” when actually all they are delivering is scholastic education. Our company clearly distinguishes between the two which increases our effectiveness and to differentiate what we deliver to customers (what most call students) from others like colleges. I thought it would be interesting to get this group’s members opinion on the difference between “Training” and “Education”, and to get group members thinking about it.

ray schroederray schroeder

Director of the UPCEA Center for Online Leadership and Strategy – and – UIS Associate Vice Chancellor of Online Learning

This is one of those questions, the answers to which will be easy to pick apart. But, I will venture a beginning:

Training is task-oriented. It is circumscribed by circumstances such as location, goal, job, career. Training’s intent is to master a task, method or approach.

Education is a broader activity that spans locations, goals, careers. Education’s intent is life guiding, life changing and lasting.

Training can have lifelong import. But, the focus is on a specific task or goal.

Education often includes task-learning.

Enough. A more important task now demands my attention – breakfast – I have been trained well for this lifelong task.

-ray

 

Rahat iqbal

Executive Director at SCI-EDUCATION SYSTEM,LONDON UK

Training direct develop skills for different profession but education reflects research and update knowledge.

Jolly Holden Jolly Holden

Faculty at American InterContinental University

When asked the difference between education and training, a 4-star general replied…do you want your daughter to have sex training or sex education? Nearly everyone in the audience (1,000+) fell out of there seats. After the laughter subsided, the general went on to reply “fundamentally, education is focused on developing critical thinking skills (know why) that help enable creative solutions, whereas training is about developing specific skill sets (know how) for consistently reliable results.” That said, while there is a large grey area between training and education, per se, when does education stop and training begin, the outcome of both is learning. As a former Air Force flight instructor, I told my students they are educated in the aerodynamics of flight, but trained on how to fly.

Joy Scott Joy Scott

Workplace Performance Improvement, Training, Instructional Design, Independent Writer

I just finished reading The Eden Conspiracy: Educating for Accomplished Citizenship by Joe Harless (1998). He explains (p. 157): “Training and education are often differentiated by saying education is to provide knowledge for unpredictable circumstances; training is for predictable circumstances.”

He also states education is provided in school, (K-college) and training is provided after school (knowledge and skills provided on-the-job). Since Harless published this book, the delivery options of education and training has changed, thanks to the Internet. Education and training can occur anywhere, and without proper context, someone can mix the labels and confuse being trained for a specific task with being educated about something they can use to determine if they should use the task they’ve been trained on.

Harless, J. (1998). The Eden Conspiracy: Educating for Accomplished Citizenship . Wheaton, IL: Guild V Publications.

Educators Weigh iPad’s Dominance of Tablet Market

Educators Weigh iPad’s Dominance of Tablet Market

http://www.edweek.org/ew/articles/2013/11/22/13ipad_ep.h33.html?tkn=LUCCCAu94sJXhXwoBrDRG%2BmCJBT04YYozBRQ&cmp=clp-sb-ascd

Susan Einhorn, the executive director of the Anytime Anywhere Learning Foundation, a Bellevue, Wash.-based organization that supports schools in developing and improving 1-to-1 computing programs, disagrees.

She said that “iPads are a consumer device; I don’t feel they’re really designed for education.” Ms. Einhorn favors tablets with what she calls “greater functionality,” such as Microsoft’s Surface tablet.

As a “technology-agnostic” organization, the International Society for Technology in Education does not take a position on specific devices, but CEO Brian C. Lewis observed that, “within a short period of time, tablets have become almost ubiquitous. What we forget is that, in another three to five years, another new thing will transform not only our world, but what’s happening in the classroom.”

Mr. Lewis said he has heard too many stories of schools and districts that purchased technology before planning how to use it to drive learning.

My two issues:
– why is an educational media such as “Education Week” outright advertising commerical products?

– why is “Educational Media” not bursting the bubble of such reckless purchasing of products without plan and idea?

A Quick Start Guide to Participating in Twitter Chats

A Quick Start Guide to Participating in Twitter Chats

http://www.guide2digitallearning.com/blog_tom_murray/quick_start_guide_twitter_chats

This past week, I had the privilege of introducing US Secretary of Education, Arne Duncan, as a guest moderator for #edtechchat, an educational Twitter chat that I founded with four members of my personal learning network (PLN).  Over the course of 60 minutes, almost 2,000 people from around the world, shared about 10,000 tweets in response to the Secretary’s six questions related to being a Connected Educator.  Secretary Duncan (@arneduncan) and his Office of Educational Technology (@officeofedtech) deemed October “Connected Educator’s Month” for the second straight year.  To close #ce13, Secretary Duncan used the #edtechchat forum to engage in conversation with educators from all over the world.

In reflecting on the chat, many people asked how to get started, and how to possibly follow such a quick flow of information. For one, 10,000 tweets in an hour is by no means typical; but then again, neither is the opportunity to interact with the US Secretary of Education. Although this particular chat with the Secretary may be an extreme example of what possibilities can arise when connecting with others online, each week there are over 160 chats that occur.  Virtually all topics are covered in some fashion. Whether you’re a 4th grade teacher (#4thchat) in Maryland (#mdedchat), a principal (#cpchat) in Arkansas (#arkedchat), a new teacher (#ntchat) in Rhode Island (#edchatri), or a parent (#ptchat) connecting on a Saturday (#satchat), there’s something for you.

This Quick Start Guide to Participating in Twitter Chats was created as part of the Digital Learning Transition MOOC (#dltmooc), an online “Massive Open Online Course”, developed by The Alliance for Education (@All4Ed) and the Friday Institute (@FridayInstitute) as part of Project 24 (@all4edproject24).  Feel free to download and share the Quick Start resource to help educators get started.

Furthermore, the Official Chat List was created by Chad Evans (@cevans5095) and me (@thomascmurray), with help from our good friend Jerry Blumengarten (@cybraryman1). This resource (shortcut: bit.ly/officialchatlist) is a comprehensive list of the educational Twitter chats that take place each week.

Start small. Choose a chat that peaks your interest. Lurk, listen, and learn. When you’re ready, jump in head first.  Grow your PLN and get connected through a Twitter chat this week!  Your students will benefit.

– See more at: http://www.guide2digitallearning.com/blog_tom_murray/quick_start_guide_twitter_chats#sthash.W1DPfmY1.dpuf

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