Archive of ‘Library and information science’ category

humanities demonstrate their value

Humanities need convincing data to demonstrate their value, says expert

Humanities scholars have always been good at conveying the importance of their work through stories, writes Paula Krebs for Inside Higher Ed, but they have been less successful at using data to do so. This need not be the case, adds Krebs, who recounts a meeting with faculty members, local employers, and public humanities representatives to discuss how to better measure the impact of a humanities education on graduates. Krebs offers a list of recommendations and concrete program changes, such as interviewing employers about their experiences with hiring graduates, that might help humanities programs better prepare students for postgraduate life.

Academica Group <today@academica.ca>

Adding Good Data to Good Stories

https://www.insidehighered.com/views/2016/04/22/importance-developing-hard-data-about-value-humanities-essay

a list of the skills that we think graduates have cultivated in their humanities education:

  • Critical thinking
  • Communications skills
  • Writing skills, with style
  • Organizational skills
  • Listening skills
  • Flexibility
  • Creativity
  • Cultural competencies, intercultural sensitivity and an understanding of cultural and historical context, including on global topics
  • Empathy/emotional intelligence
  • Qualitative analysis
  • People skills
  • Ethical reasoning
  • Intellectual curiosity

As part of our list, we also agreed that graduates should have the ability to:

  • Meet deadlines
  • Construct complex arguments
  • Provide attention to detail and nuance (close reading)
  • Ask the big questions about meaning, purpose, the human condition
  • Communicate in more than one language
  • Understand differences in genre (mode of communication)
  • Identify and communicate appropriate to each audience
  • Be comfortable dealing with gray areas
  • Think abstractly beyond an immediate case
  • Appreciate differences and conflicting perspectives
  • Identify problems as well as solving them
  • Read between the lines
  • Receive and respond to feedback

Then we asked what we think our graduates should be able to do but perhaps can’t — or not as a result of anything we’ve taught them, anyway. The employers were especially valuable here, highlighting the ability to:

  • Use new media, technologies and social media
  • Work with the aesthetics of communication, such as design
  • Perform a visual presentation and analysis
  • Identify, translate and apply skills from course work
  • Perform data analysis and quantitative research
  • Be comfortable with numbers
  • Work well in groups, as leader and as collaborator
  • Take risks
  • Identify processes and structures
  • Write and speak from a variety of rhetorical positions or voices
  • Support an argument
  • Identify an audience, research it and know how to address it
  • Know how to locate one’s own values in relation to a task one has been asked to perform
  • Reflect

proctoring

Clemson University’s Centralized Proctoring Story

http://marketing.softwaresecure.com/acton/fs/blocks/showLandingPage/a/10395/p/p-002f/t/page/fm/0

e-Campus news offers a proctoring model: http://www.ecampusnews.com/whitepapers/5-step-guide-to-how-clemson-university-online-is-centralizing-online-proctoring/ conveniently presented in a 5-step outline, webinar and “case study” paper.

According to them, you just “Follow their story and learn how the team at Clemson Online implemented RPNow, and how they’re planning to centralize remote proctoring to increase student convenience, faculty efficiency and reduce the costs of exam administration.”

It is, of course, sponsored by the company, who will be paid for the proctoring
http://www.softwaresecure.com/product/remote-proctor-now/

Here are my issues with the proposal:

  1. step 5 of the five-step outline: “Take control of the payment model. Institutional payment (as opposed to student pay) creates a better experience for the student and cost savings for all.”
    so, if the institution pays, then student don’t pay? I find this and illusion, since the institution pays by using students’ tuition. which constantly grows. so, the statement is rather deceptive.
  2. As with the huge controversy around Turnitin (e.g., this 2009 article, and this 2012 article), “mechanizing” the very humane process evaluation is outright wrong. The attempt to compensate the lack of sufficient number of faculty by “outsourcing” to machines is en vogue with the nationwide strive of higher ed administration to create an “assembly line” type of education, which makes profit, but it is dubious if it teaches [well].
  3. Pedagogically (as per numerous discussions in the Chronicle of Higher Education and similar sources), if the teaching materials and exams are structured in an engaging way, students cheat much less. The “case study” paper claims reduction of cheating, but it is reduction based on fear to be caught, not based on genuine interest in learning.

 

politics of Europe

Between Past and Future: The Revolutions of 1989 and Their Aftermath

By Sorin Antohi, Vladimir Tismaneanu

https://books.google.com/books?id=1pl5T45FwIwC&lpg=PA74&ots=sKFeKFaAxX&dq=Erotik%20der%20Geopolitik&pg=PA74#v=onepage&q=Erotik%20der%20Geopolitik&f=false

Post-Theory, Games, and Discursive Resistance: The Bulgarian Case

By Aleksandŭr Kʹosev

Mitteleuropa und der Balkan. Erotik der Geopolitik. Die Images zweier Regionen in den westlichen Massenmedien
“Mitteleuropa” and the Balkans. Eroticism of Geopolitics. The Images of Two Regions in Western Media

Author(s): Aleksander Kiossev
Subject(s): Cultural Essay, Political Essay, Societal Essay
Published by: Neue Literatur
http://www.ceeol.com/search/article-detail?id=172865

game consoles

Microsoft kills off Xbox 360 after more than a decade

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/technology/2016/04/21/microsoft-kills-off-xbox-360-after-more-than-a-decade/

more about game consoles in this IMS blog:
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=xbox

virtual reality


social media in academia

Research: Social media has negative impact on academic performance

By Denny Carter, Managing Editor
April 17th, 2013
My note: very weak article by the managing editor
  • first: link to the Hospital Center, but not to the study; difficult to check the facts, which are discussed in the editorial.
  • title talks about “social media,” but it is not about social media, it is about texting. danah boyd and Eszter Hargittai are apparently not household names in the house of the managing editor
  • then the author jumps from one issue to another: mindfulness or contemplative computing, but h/she has no clue about these issues also.
    the research, which claims that social media (which is not social media, but more like BYOD + texting) has a negative impact on academic performance is no different the research that shows very positive impact of learning with social media. It is NOT about social media, it is about how it is used (methodology).
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More on contemplative computing in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=contemplative+computing

Also on the connection of mobile devices and sleep:
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2016/04/09/sleep/

timeline tools for history and education

Technology tools for history lessons

HSTRY Timeline Creator.
HSTRY is a multimedia timeline creation tool that will work on your laptop, Chromebook, iPad, or tablet. With a HSTRY account you can build timelines in a vertical scroll format similar to that of a Facebook feed. To start the process pick a topic and upload a cover photo. To add events to the timeline just click the “+” symbol and select the type of media that you want to add to your timeline. You can add videos, images, audio, and text to the events on your timeline.
There are two features of HSTRY that make it stand-out from the crowd. First, as a teacher you can create an online classroom in which you can view all of your students’ timelines. Second, as a teacher you can build questions into timelines that you share with your students. You can even build-in explanations of the answers to your questions.
For other timeline creation tools, check out this chart.

My note: HSTRY could be a great tool, if the organizers were not that greedy. Their plan + kicks in way to early and does not allow participants to collaborate. E.g., Zaption allows teachers / students to “share” their presentations, but HSTRY asks right away to upgrade. Thumb down!

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5 Timeline Creation Tools Compared – Chart

http://www.freetech4teachers.com/2014/12/5-timeline-creation-tools-compared-chart.html

Free Online Tools for Creating Timelines – Richard Byrne – FreeTech4Teachers.com

  Multimedia options Collaboration options Registration required iPad/ tablet compatibility Output/ publishing
Timeline JS

timeline.knightlab.com

Text Images Videos Yes, if you collaborate through Google Spreadsheets*** Google Account required. Display: yes Creation: no Embed code for posting  on blog / website.
RWT Timeline

bitly.com/1ym46nY

Text Images No. No. iPad app bitly.com/1vMTI7C Android app bitly.com/1vOcZEB Web app bitly.com/1ym46nY PDF.

Image saved on camera roll.

TimeGlider*

timeglider.com

Text Images Yes. Yes. Display: yes Creation: yes Embed code for posting on blog / website. Direct link to TG page.
Dipity**

dipity.com

Text Images Videos Yes. Yes. Display: yes Creation: no Embed code for posting on blog / website.
MyHistro

myhistro.com

Text Images Videos No. Yes. Display: yes Creation: iOS PDF.

Embed code.

*TimeGlider’s basic plan is free for students. A paid subscription is required to activate collaboration tools.

**Dipity’s basic plan is free for students. The basic account is limited to three timelines.

***Timeline JS utilizes Google Spreadsheets as the basis of timeline event creation. Students collaborate on a spreadsheet to build timelines. A video of the process is available at http://bitly.com/1zRLdr5

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More on the use of technology in history in this IMS blog:

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=history

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