Archive of ‘information literacy’ category

fake news hybrid war

https://www.nytimes.com/video/opinion/100000006188102/what-is-pizzagate.html

Russia and far right spreading disinformation ahead of EU elections, investigators say

‘The goal here is bigger than any one election. It is to constantly divide, increase distrust and undermine our faith in institutions and democracy itself’
Matt Apuzzo, Adam Satariano 2019-05-12T13:13:04+01:00″

https://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/europe/eu-elections-latest-russia-far-right-interference-fake-news-meddling-a8910311.html

Genrefication School Libraries Like Bookstores

How Genrefication Makes School Libraries More Like Bookstores

Gail Cornwall Jul 22, 2018 https://www.kqed.org/mindshift/51336/how-genrefication-makes-school-libraries-more-like-bookstores

Under the Dewey Decimal System that revolutionized and standardized book shelving starting in 1876, nonfiction essentially already gets the genrefication treatment with, for example, Music located in the 780s and Paleontology in the 560s. Yet most fiction is shelved in one big clump alphabetized by author’s last name.

Many librarians say the “search hurdle” imposed by Dewey classification (a system originally designed for adults) significantly reduces the odds of a child finding something new they’re likely to enjoy. In a genrefied library, on the other hand, a young reader standing near a favorite book need only stick out a hand to find more like it. (It’s a bit like the analog version of Amazon’s recommendation feature: “Customers who bought this item also bought”)

The Dewey-loyal also oppose genrefication in principle for, interestingly enough, the same reason others support it: self-sufficiency. Sure, they argue, kids might be better able to find a book independently in their school library, but what happens when they go to the public one? When they get to high school?

The debate has led to compromise positions. Some leave books for older students in the Dewey arrangement while genrefying for younger ones. Other librarians rearrange middle readers and young adult books but leave picture books shelved by author since it can be unclear how to categorize a story about a duck driving a tractor.

History of Syria

Syria: proxy theatre of war

Never in the interests of the ordinary citizen

The Syrian people’s uprising began as a struggle over social and economic conditions, a fight for democracy in place of repression. Now it has been hijacked by regional and global conflicts

Karim Emile Bitar 21 January 2019

https://mondediplo.com/2013/06/02syria

If there is a constant in the history of the countries of the Levant, it is the conflict between the aspirations of their inhabitants for freedom, and the realpolitik that has led to the sacrifice of those aspirations to the geostrategic interests of foreign powers.

History of Hungary

Rhymes from Central Europe

Rhymes from Central Europe

Norman Stone’s sparkling new book, Hungary: A Short History, is a warning against ignoring history. It presents a country that never quite “caught up” with the West, and therefore never “settled down” to a calm post-nationalist existence. The modernising influence of industrialisation has always been subsumed in the problem of borders, religions, languages, and nationalities.

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more on Hungary in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=hungary

Copyrighted Works Freely Available

Thousands of Copyrighted Works Will Now Be Freely Available to Teachers

https://blogs.edweek.org/teachers/teaching_now/2019/01/public_domain_day.html
Why has it taken almost 100 years for these copyrights to expire? In 1999, Congress passed the Copyright Term Extension Act, which extended protections for rights holders for 20 years. That created a two-decade gap between the works of 1922—which passed into the public domain in 1998, before the law was passed—and those of 1923.
Some teachers on the lesson marketplace Teachers Pay Teachers are profiting from materials adapted or taken wholesale from other educators.
Of course, even before books, movies, and musical compositions passed into the public domain, teachers looking to reprint and distribute them in part could have claimed fair use—an exception to copyright law that allows excerpts of protected material to be used for criticism, research, journalism, or teaching without permission or payment. But what counts as fair use is decided in court, and educators could still have faced legal challenges—especially if they distributed or sold their work to other teachers.
Duke University’s Center for the Study of the Public Domain has listed (and linked to copies of) some of the most well-known titles. And the digital library HathiTrust has compiled over 50,000 works that are now freely available.
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‘The drought is over’: mass US copyright expiry brings flood of works into public domain

https://www.theguardian.com/books/2019/jan/02/the-drought-is-over-mass-us-copyright-expiry-brings-flood-of-works-into-public-domain

 

Gettysburg Address at LC

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We’re marking the 155th anniversary of the #GettysburgAddress with a special one-day display of the Nicolay copy of the speech handwritten by Abraham Lincoln, and the #LettersToLincoln crowdsourcing transcribe-a-thon with local students and online friends! See the display in the Great Hall until 4:30 today, or find out how to get involved in the transcription project at crowd.loc.gov. #LibraryOfCongress #collections #crowdsourcing

A post shared by Library of Congress (@librarycongress) on

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more on history at this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=history

MnState OER webinar

Open Textbook Webinar — a 90-minute online meeting to learn about open textbooks.

Peer review of open textbooks is a critical component of assessing quality and supporting faculty looking for resources to use in their own classes.  After the workshop, you’ll be eligible to earn a $200 stipend if you provide a short review of an open textbook from the OpenTextbook Library.  Reviews are due 6-8 weeks following the workshop.

To prepare for the webinar, please take a few minutes and visit the Open Textbook Library (http://open.umn.edu/opentextbooks/). Glance through the Open Textbook Library and look for textbooks in your discipline that may be appropriate for you to review.  In order to receive the $200 stipend, you must 1) participate in the webinar and 2) complete a textbook review.  (Please note: There may not be texts available for review in your areas of expertise.)

When:   Wednesday, November 14, 2018; 2:30 pm – 4:00 pm

Note that additional Open Textbook Webinars are scheduled throughout the academic year.  Please contact Karen Pikula, OER Faculty Development Coordinator, at Karen.Pikula@minnstate.edu if you cannot attend the meeting on Monday. 

How:     Join the webinar through Adobe Connect

My notes:

open.umn.edu

3 models of creating textbooks: 1. write a book on their own 2. commercial model 3. Funder

Creative Common and copyright.

creative commons licenses

CC licenses free to: copy, share, edit, mix, keep, use

reviewing a textbook in the OER. Edit a book in OER

New Directions in Instructional Design

ELI Online Focus Session

New Directions in Instructional Design: Keeping Pace in a Time of Rapid Change

April 19 & 20, 2017 | Noon–3:30 p.m. (ET)

https://events.educause.edu/eli/focus-sessions/2017/new-directions-in-instructional-design-keeping-pace-in-a-time-of-rapid-change

  • What new organizational models and practices do instructional design teams need to adopt?
  • How can instructional designers best make use of the increasing amount of learning data that is available?
  • What kinds of evidence-based practices make the most sense for instructional designers?
  • What are some professional development approaches that provide structure for instructional designers to share their mutual areas of expertise, while focusing on key areas of professional growth?
  • Learning technologists and instructional designers
  • Campus teaching and learning center directors and staff
  • Faculty members and instructors
  • Senior teaching and learning administrators (e.g., deans, provost office staff)
  • Librarians
  • Presentation Sessions: Sessions designed to provide an overview of specific topic areas and successful emerging approaches related to the focus session theme immediately followed by opportunities to interact one-on-one with session presenters.
  • Project Rounds: A series of institutional cases/examples presented in a sequential, fast-paced format exploring a single project, emerging technology, or campus initiative. Project rounds will be followed by an opportunity for separate discussion with each of the presenters.

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more on ID in this IMS post
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=instructional+design

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