future of textbooks

Memento Mori: Why the Chegg IPO is Not About Textbooks

http://www.edukwest.com/chegg-ipo/

About 80% of the revenue still comes from renting textbooks, which might seem a bit outdated with everyone talking about tablet deployments and digital textbooks.

Though heavily funded and with more than 225,000 digital textbooks in its library, the startup was sold for pennies on a dollar to Intel Education last week.

With the Internet and tablet devices, publishers themselves can now go directly for the students through digital products. There is no need for physical bookstores or other middlemen to distribute the textbooks. Also professors are now able to sell their own textbooks directly to students.

This IPO is not so much about the current business of renting physical textbooks but about the time after paper-based textbooks. Chegg apparently does not see a future with publishers or professors by their side, and they will probably choose more direct sales channels in order to balance out sinking margins.

information literacy

“From Teaching to Consulting: Librarians as Information Literacy Designers. An Interview with Carrie Donovan” by Brian Mathews.  Posted to The Ubiquitous Librarian blog.

http://chronicle.com/blognetwork/theubiquitouslibrarian/2015/06/08/from-teaching-to-consulting-librarians-as-information-literacy-designers-an-interview-with-carrie-donovan/

“Library instruction and information literacy is poised for a transformation that will be groundbreaking and inspiring.” (Donovan)  It was heartening to see that Donovan was troubled and inspired by Susanna Cowan’s “Information Literacy: The Battle We Won That We Lost?” (portal: Libraries and the Academy, 14(1):23-32; online at https://muse-jhu-edu.libproxy.stcloudstate.edu/journals/portal_libraries_and_the_academy/v014/14.1.cowan.pdf).  “The question is not about information literacy’s validity. The question is whether we must cling to information literacy as a narrower concept and practice within educational (and now many other) institutions that rely, still, on librarians as key purveyors of this knowledge.” (Cowan)

“Something that has helped me [to begin to transition to a place where “I can leave behind my sense of ownership of information literacy”] was not to hang on to how I have done things in the past and to seek out new ideas and to consider all the options – even those that really challenge my way of thinking, my professional identity, and what I think I know to be true.” (Donovan)

“If we care about information literacy, let us be brave enough to let it go and find innovative ways to further the educational underpinnings of the concept without the bulky and perhaps untimely programmatic weight.” (Cowan)

 

 

 

Keith

 

Keith Ewing

Professor, Library Systems & Digital Projects

Google drive for interactive presentations

An Excellent Google Drive Tool for Creating Interactive Presentations

http://www.educatorstechnology.com/2015/04/create-interactive-presentations-on-google-drive.html

Pear Deck

Doceri – The Interactive Whiteboard for iPad.

Creating a Library App

Creating a Library App: Things to Know Before You Go Mobile
Tuesday, April 28, 2015 11AM-12PM PDT
Registration link: http://www.cla-net.org/?861

Mobile apps are a popular topic in libraries. But what does it take to create one and what kind of programming can you do with apps? Is an app the right solution, or should you create a responsive website? What is the process like, and what resources are needed? How do you manage privacy, security, and legal concerns? Who do you need to get the job done, and what skills should they have?

These are all important questions that should be asked (and answered) before you think about creating a mobile app. Learn from expert panelists from libraries and nonprofits who have created, developed, and managed mobile apps for their organizations. Panelists will share practical advice and information based on experience, as well as helpful tools and resources.

Participants will learn:

  • The difference between a mobile app, a mobile site, and a responsive site
  • Three important considerations when deciding whether or not to create a mobile app.
  • Five tips for approaching the design of a mobile app, mobile site, or responsive site.

About the Presenters

  • Stacey Watson is the Senior Librarian and certified scrum Master in the Digital User Experience Department at the Denver Public Library.  She oversees the user experience and content strategy for the library’s websites, online catalog, and digital services. Most recently she and her team developed Volume, a responsive website featuring hand selected albums by local artists.
  • Anna Jaeger and her team at Caravan Studios create mobile apps that are designed in partnership with nonprofit and community-focused organizations to meet the needs of their constituents. Anna has been a frequent speaker on nonprofit and environmental technology since 2007. Prior to her work with Caravan Studios, Ms. Jaeger was a founder and co-director of TechSoup Global’s GreenTech initiative and the director of TechSoup Global’s IT Engineering department.
  • Ani Boyadjian has been a working librarian since 1990. An LAPL staffer since 1996, she is now Research & Special Collections Manager at the Los Angeles Public Library, where she also oversees the Library’s Digitization efforts. She most recently spearheaded the development of the ARchive LAPL app in a partnership with USC and app developers Neon Roots, to use augmented reality to tell stories about the historic Central Library.

information literacy and social media

library approach to information literacy. or WHAT IS information literacy?

is it the 90-ish notion of standing up in front of bored class and lecturing them how important is to use the online databases, which the university subscribe for

52% of teens use YouTube or other Social Media sites for a typical research assignment in school:

slide 29 out of 56:

some_text
http://image.slidesharecdn.com/generationzfinaljune17-140617085136-phpapp01/95/meet-generation-z-forget-everything-you-learned-about-millennials-29-638.jpg

Infographic from:

http://www.adweek.com/news/advertising-branding/gen-z-infographic-can-help-marketers-get-wise-future-159642

Should information literacy be about digital literacy? Geo-spatial knowledge?

some_text

Should information literacy include videos? Games?

Should information literacy be multiliteracy? Transliteracy?
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2014/11/27/scholarly-communication-and-information-literacy/

This is what Gen Z will expect from information literacy in particular, from library and education in general:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=h11u3vtcpaY#t=314

 

on digital literacy and old habits

“Academic libraries are concerned about the digital literacy of their users but their programs continue to be focused on the information components defined by the President’s Commission on Information Literacy.” (p. 45)

Cordell, R.  (2013). Library Instruction in the 21st Century. In: Rosanne, M (Ed.) Library Reference Services and Information Literacy: Models for Academic Institutions: Models for Academic Institutions. IGI Global.

More on digital literacy in this blog:

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/?s=library+digital+literacy

Library Use of eBooks, 2013 Edition

Library Use of eBooks, 2013 Edition

http://www.researchandmarkets.com/publication/mq2u7gc/library_use_of_ebooks_2013_edition

The study also covers: use of eBooks for course reserves, eBook issues in interlibrary loan, and the emergence of dedicated endowments for eBook purchases. The study also covers the types of eBook models preferred by libraries of different types, and how librarians view likely developments in the eBook industry.

research with social media

Doctoral Cohorts and Research using Social Media

Explore social media sites to find out what is the most pertinent “talk” in your scientific community. What are the latest trends and discussions, topics of research and interests. Most prominent social media sites, such as
LinkedIn, https://www.linkedin.com/
Twitter, https://twitter.com/
Facebook, https://www.facebook.com/
Pinterest https://www.pinterest.com/
Instagram, http://instagram.com/
use hashtags.
LinkedIn has “professional groups.”

Identify your hashtag strategy similarly to your keyword strategy when searching peer-reviewed articles

  E.g., if your interest is #principalship, you can seek channels and conversations by using it as a hashtag

  Search and subscribe to LinkedIn “Interests/Groups” and lurk or actively participate in the conversations.

  Consider start and maintenance of your own blog with your daily reflections on your research progress

  E.g., LinkedIn can be very much used as a blog, although you can subscribe for a free one such as Edublog

p. 141. Chapter 8 “Using Social Media in Research.”
Bell, J. (1999). Doing your research project: A guide for first-time researchers in education and social science (3rd ed.). Buckingham [England] ; Philadelphia: Open University Press. (Available on Google and at SCSU Library through ILL)

Crowdsourcing, social networking. Consider the following questions:

  1. What are your goals?
  2. Who do you want to reach?
  3. Why do you want to reach them?
  4. Which digital tool or platform will be most effective in enabling you to reach your goals?
  5. If you already spend time each day using social media for personal reasons, how much time are you able to set aside each day to use social media for research?
  6. at what time of day will you engage in social media? (time differences, if you are communicating globally)

the value of social media: Community, Content, Conversations.

 

Davis III, C.H.F., Deil-Amen, R., Rios-Aguilar, C., & González Canché, M.S. Social media and higher education: A literature review and research directions. Report printed by the University of Arizona and Claremont Graduate University. Accessed January 27, 2015 http://works.bepress.com/hfdavis/2/