Archive of ‘information literacy’ category

The Great Hack Cambridge Analytica

The Great Hack (2019) – Exploring how a data company named Cambridge Analytica came to symbolise the dark side of social media in the wake of the 2016 U.S. presidential election, as uncovered by journalist Carole Cadwalladr. [01:54:00] from r/Documentaries

https://www.netflix.com/title/80117542

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Former Cambridge Analytica chief receives seven-year directorship ban from r/worldnews

https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2020/sep/24/cambridge-analytica-directorship-ban-alexander-nix

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more on Cambridge Analytica in this IMS blog
https://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=cambridge

Hands-on is “goggles-on”

https://www.insidehighered.com/digital-learning/blogs/online-trending-now/hands-classes-distance-and-emerging-virtual-future

As we enter the Fourth Industrial Revolution (4IR), we must be vigilant to keep our classes relevant to the rapidly changing workplace and the emerging digital aspects of life in the 2020s.

deployment of 5G delivery to mobile computing

Certainly, 5G provides a huge upgrade in bandwidth, enabling better streaming of video and gaming. However, it is the low latency of 5G that enables the most powerful potential for distance learning. VR, AR and XR could not smoothly function in the 4G environment because of the lag in images and responses caused by a latency rate of 50 milliseconds (ms). The new 5G technologies drop that latency rate to 5 ms or less, which produces responses and images that our brains perceive as seamlessly instant.

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more on the 4IR in this IMS blog
https://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=industrial+revolution

how to research questions

Research and refining research questions (for graduate students) – resources

 

Research questions from BabakFarshchian

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Specifying a purpose, Purpose statement, Hypostheses and research questions from Muhammad Naushad Ghazanfar

Stepping stones to_good_research_questions from Mónica Gilbert-Sáez

faith in expertise

Nichols, T. (2017). How America Lost Faith in Expertise. Foreign Affairs. https://www.foreignaffairs.com/articles/united-states/2017-02-13/how-america-lost-faith-expertise
The larger discussions, from what constitutes a nutritious diet to what actions will best further U.S. interests, require conversations between ordinary citizens and experts. But increasingly, citizens don’t want to have those conversations. Rather, they want to weigh in and have their opinions treated with deep respect and their preferences honored not on the strength of their arguments or on the evidence they present but based on their feelings, emotions, and whatever stray information they may have picked up here or there along the way.
Hofstadter argued that this overwhelming complexity produced feelings of helplessness and anger among a citizenry that knew itself to be increasingly at the mercy of more sophisticated elites. “
Credentialism can run amok, and guilds can use it cynically to generate revenue or protect their fiefdoms with unnecessary barriers to entry. But it can also reflect actual learning and professional competence, helping separate real experts from amateurs or charlatans.
Experts are often wrong, and the good ones among them are the first to admit it…. Yet these days, members of the public search for expert errors and revel in finding them—<b>not to improve understanding but rather to give themselves license to disregard all expert advice they don’t like.<b>
The convenience of the Internet is a tremendous boon, but mostly for people already trained in research and who have some idea what they’re looking for. It does little good, unfortunately, for a student or an untrained layperson who has never been taught how to judge the provenance of information or the reputability of a writer.
Libraries, or at least their reference and academic sections, once served as a kind of first cut through the noise of the marketplace. The Internet, however, is less a library than a giant repository where anyone can dump anything. In practice, this means that a search for information will rely on algorithms usually developed by for-profit companies using opaque criteria. Actual research is hard and often boring. It requires the ability to find authentic information, sort through it, analyze it, and apply it.
Government and expertise rely on each other, especially in a democracy. The technological and economic progress that ensures the well-being of a population requires a division of labor, which in turn leads to the creation of professions. Professionalism encourages experts to do their best to serve their clients, respect their own knowledge boundaries, and demand that their boundaries be respected by others, as part of an overall service to the ultimate client: society itself. 
Dictatorships, too, demand this same service of experts, but they extract it by threat and direct its use by command. This is why dictatorships are actually less efficient and less productive than democracies (despite some popular stereotypes to the contrary). In a democracy, the expert’s service to the public is part of the social contract.
Too few citizens today understand democracy to mean a condition of political equality in which all get the franchise and are equal in the eyes of the law. Rather, they think of it as a state of actual equality, in which every opinion is as good as any other, regardless of the logic or evidentiary base behind it.
#DunningKrugerEffect #metacognition #democracy #science #academy #fakenews #conspiracytheories #politics #idiocracy #InformationTechnology #Internet

embedded librarianship overview literature

Abrizah, A., Inuwa, S., & Afiqah-Izzati, N. (2016). Systematic Literature Review Informing LIS Professionals on Embedding Librarianship Roles. Journal of Academic Librarianship, 42(6), 636–643. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.acalib.2016.08.010
https://www.mendeley.com/catalogue/api/fulltext-resolver/66b9b868-c505-32a9-b50f-c3fc51321c3f/?doi=10.1016/j.acalib.2016.08.010
identifies and documents embedding librarianship roles as reported in the Library and Information Science (LIS) literature.
Findings The roles of embedded librarians were identified, especially in the context of service delivery, all of which reported to be applied to academic libraries. Information literacy instruction, research and other scholarly activities, distance and online learning as well as embedding in classrooms, were described as ways of ensuring successful embedding librarianship. Implications The roles reported in the literature should inform practicing librarians contemplating embedding practices, guide formal embedded librarianship programs, and encourage other librarians to consider new skills in support of embedding roles.
p. 637 The idea behind EL model is to demonstrate librarians’ expertise asinformation specialists and to apply this expertise in ways that willhave a direct and deep impact on the research, teaching or otherworks being done (Carlson & Kneale, 2011).Carlson and Kneale(2011)pointed out that as librarians seek to redefine themselves, themodel of EL is generating interest as an effectual way of applying theknowledge and skills of librarians towards the information challengesof the digital age.
Faculty collaboration with the embedded librarian is the core of em-bedded information literacy instruction. Faculty-librarian relationshipbuilding is of great significance because the two must work closely to-gether over an extended period of time, it is essential that librarianschoose their partnership carefully. Several librarians stress the need towork only in partnerships where there is trust and mutual respect(Carncross, 2013). Librarians build these relationships in differentways, while collaborative relationship can be built in numerous ways,it is essential that bothparties have common goals and know the impor-tance of developing information literacy skills in their students. The most significant collaboration are from campuses in which librarian and university administrators have made information literacy a priority on campus, and have provided librarians and faculty with the time re-quired to make the collaboration successful (Cramer, 2013).
The embedded librarian is focused on course goals and learning objectives outside of the library and across the curriculum
The review designates that EL in courses, classrooms and depart-ments see librarians conducting the following specific tasks: teach stu-dents how to be savvy searchers using computer and laptops (Boyer,2015); collaborate where librarian and faculty member teach eachother, exchanging favors, and the librarian selecting useful resourcesfor the faculty (Ivey, 2003); take part in meetings to promote librarian’spresence and establish communication with the students, researchersand faculty (Jacobs, 2010); provide access to course-related library re-sources, in-class instruction sessions, library instructional handouts, in-formation on referencing style, library Webinar information as well asteach note-taking (Bezet, 2013).
The review shows that academic libraries that engage their distancelearning communities through an embedded librarian as online co-instructors to deliver technological applications such as instant messag-ing, e-mail, and wikis. This EL model facilitates direct interaction be-tween students and librarians regardless of physical proximity.Edwards and Black (2012)andEdwards et al. (2010)evaluated the pro-gram of embedded librarians in an online graduate educational technol-ogy course and found that students were helped with their onlineassignments.

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more on embedded librarianship in this IMS blog
https://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=embedded

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