Archive of ‘information literacy’ category

middle class in developed countries

Middle Class Fortunes in Western Europe

From 1991 to 2010, the middle class expands in France, the Netherlands and the United Kingdom, but, as in the United States, shrinks in Germany, Italy and Spain

http://www.pewglobal.org/2017/04/24/middle-class-fortunes-in-western-europe/

The role of the middle class in developed economies

The size and the well-being of the middle class are intertwined with some of the key economic challenges facing the developed world this century – income inequality is rising in many countries, economic growth is anemic, and economic mobility is lesser than in the past.

A smaller middle class or a relatively less well-off middle class often reflects a more unequal income distribution. In turn, increases in income inequality present an adverse climate for economic growth. A relative decline in the incomes of lower- and middle-income families may create a drag on overall consumption in the economy, lead to excessive borrowing by these families, or provide disincentives to invest in education.

middle class in the US is smaller than in Western Europe

A more vibrant middle class may also improve the economic outlook for future generations. In the U.S., for example, communities with larger middle classes offer a greater likelihood that children will experience upward mobility relative to their parents’ status in the income distribution. A similar relationship has also been found to exist across countries, whereby intergenerational mobility is greater in countries with less income inequality.

Many countries in Western Europe have significantly larger middle classes than the U.S.

The U.S. has larger lower- and upper-income tiers than the selected countries from Western Europe

Income inequality is related to the size of the middle class in a country

 

 

every country book

This Literature Map of the World Shows You Every Country’s Favourite Book

https://theculturetrip.com/europe/articles/this-literature-map-of-the-world-shows-you-every-countrys-favourite-book/book-map world

Following are the SCSU library locations:
USA – To kill a mockingbird  – PS3562.E353 T6x
Russia – War and Peace  – AC1 .G72 v.51
Canada – Anne of Green Gables – PR6025.O45 A5 1994x
United Kingdom – Pride and Prejudice –  PR4034 .P7 1991b online at http://www.pemberley.com/janeinfo/pridprej.html
Spain – Shadow in the Wind – PQ6668.U49 S6613 2004
Iran – Persepolis – PN6747.S245 P4713
Ireland – Ulysses – PR6019.O9 U4 1998
Bulgaria – Under the Yoke – PG1037.V3 U5x
China – Dream of the Red Chamber – PL2998.T745 D7 1958cx
Congo – The antipeople – PQ3989.2.S64 A813 1988

What do you think should be your country’s favorite book?

 

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apps for special needs students

Android

Categories
Apps
Android Apps for Learners with Autism
Android Apps for Learners with Dyslexia
Android Apps for Vision Impaired

iOS

Categories
Apps
Apps for Dyslexic Learners
Apps for Autistic Learners
Apps for The Visually Impaired
Apps for Learners with Writing Difficulties

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more on special ed in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=special+education

AP stylebook and they

AP Stylebook Embraces ‘They’ as Singular, Gender-Neutral Pronoun

http://www.nbcnews.com/feature/nbc-out/ap-stylebook-embraces-they-singular-gender-neutral-pronoun-n739076

In its latest edition, the Associated Press Stylebook — a widely used reference for journalists — is embracing the use of “they” as a singular pronoun.

more on proofreading in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=proofreading

academic search engines

Educational Technology and Mobile Learning educatorstechnology.com · Dec 23, 2016

https://www.pinterest.com/pin/71072500350222752/

10 Great Academic Search Engines for Research Students

https://scholar.google.com/ | https://eric.ed.gov/ | http://www.virtuallrc.com/ | http://www.citeulike.org/ | http://jurn.org/  |   http://academic.research.microsoft.com/  | https://www.loc.gov/  |  https://www.refseek.com/  |  http://www.sciencedirect.com/  | https://www.academia.edu/  |  https://www.researchgate.net/

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more about research in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=research

fake news resources

Fake News: A Library Resource Round-Up

February 23, 2017 By  ALA Public Programs Office
http://www.programminglibrarian.org/articles/fake-news-library-round
https://www.pinterest.com/pin/218917231867987168
Evaluating Information,” ALA LibGuide
Fake News,” Indiana University East Campus Library

From
Mike Caulfield’s Web Literacy for Student Fact-Checkers
(https://webliteracy.pressbooks.com/)
Fact-Checking Organizations

There are many fact-checking sites outside the U.S. Here is a small sample.

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An Extremely Helpful List of Fake and Misleading News Sites to Watch Out For

By   

http://nymag.com/selectall/2016/11/fake-facebook-news-sites-to-avoid.html

https://www.pinterest.com/pin/237776055306492834

https://docs.google.com/document/d/10eA5-mCZLSS4MQY5QGb5ewC3VAL6pLkT53V_81ZyitM/preview

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UW professor: The information war is real, and we’re losing it

http://www.seattletimes.com/seattle-news/politics/uw-professor-the-information-war-is-real-and-were-losing-it/

Starbird argues in a new paper, set to be presented at a computational social-science conference in May, that these “strange clusters” of wild conspiracy talk, when mapped, point to an emerging alternative media ecosystem on the web of surprising power and reach.

It features sites such as Infowars.com, hosted by informal President Donald Trump adviser Alex Jones

There are dozens of other conspiracy-propagating websites such as beforeitsnews.com, nodisinfo.com and veteranstoday.com.

It isn’t a traditional left-right political axis, she found. There are right-wing sites like Danger & Play and left-wing sensationalizers such as The Free Thought Project. Some appear to be just trying to make money, while others are aggressively pushing political agendas.

The true common denominator, she found, is anti-globalism — deep suspicion of free trade, multinational business and global institutions.

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The News Literacy Project

http://www.thenewsliteracyproject.org/

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more on fake news in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=fake+news

fake news

Most students can’t tell fake news from real news, study shows

Posted by

Most students can’t tell fake news from real news, study shows

A Stanford study found that the majority of middle school students can’t tell the difference between real news and fake news. In fact, 82 percent couldn’t distinguish between a real news story on a website and a “sponsored content” post.

The WSJ: Of the 8,704 students studied (ranging in age from middle school to college level), four in ten high-school students believed that the region near Japan’s Fukushima nuclear plant was toxic after seeing an unsourced photo of deformed daisies coupled with a headline about the Japanese area. The photo, keep in mind, had no source or location attribution. Meanwhile, two out of every three middle-schoolers were fooled by an article on financial preparedness penned by a bank executive.

But with 62 percent of U.S. adults getting the majority of their news from social media, the responsibility for this issue also lies with the social media organizations themselves, such as Facebook and Twitter. Both Google and Facebook have made steps toward thwarting the fake news onslaught, including banning fake news organizations from their ad network.

Even in minuscule amounts, fake news has a much greater ability to spread quickly and be consumed by many given the nature of the salacious headlines themselves.

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more on fake news in this IMS blog:
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=fake+news

collaboration in academia

International Survey of Research University Faculty: Means of Scholarly Communications and Collaboration (ISBN No:978-157440-446-3 )

http://www.primaryresearch.com/AddCart.aspx?ReportID=397

The survey data is based on a survey of more than 500 scholars drawn from more than 50 major research universities in the USA, Canada, the UK, Australia, New Zealand and Ireland. Data is broken out by various criteria, such as type of university, scholar’s country, gender, political views, academic subject specialty, academic title and other criteria.

  • 50.69% of respondents are currently collaborating or coordinating research with scholars or other researchers from other universities or colleges outside of their country.
  • Web based meetings were most common in the Engineering, Mathematics, Computer Science, Physics, Chemistry and other Science and Technology fields, 33.70, and least common in the Literature and Languages fields, 2.92.
  • 7.72% of respondents routinely use Adobe Connect to communicate with scholars at other locations.
  • 87.52% of respondents have co-authored a journal article with one or more other authors. Co-authorship was most common in Australia/New Zealand, 96.77%, followed by Canada, 93.10%, and the UK/Ireland, 89.83%. It was least common in the USA, 85.07%.

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more on collaboration in academia in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=collaboration

social media for anthropology

ANTH 101 with Kelly Branam Macauley

Plamen Miltenoff: http://web.stcloudstate.edu/pmiltenoff/faculty/
relevant classes I teach and might be of interest for you:
http://web.stcloudstate.edu/pmiltenoff/lib290/. if you want to survey the class, here is the FB group page: https://www.facebook.com/groups/LIB290/
and
http://web.stcloudstate.edu/pmiltenoff/lib490/

short link to this presentation: http://bit.ly/lib4anth

Please pull out your smartphones, go to your Internet browser and and type: kahoot.it or click on the link: https://play.kahoot.it/

what is social media from anthropological point of view?

a study, the “Why We Post” project, has just been published by nine anthropologists, led by Daniel Miller of University College, London. worked independently for 15 months at locations in Brazil, Britain, Chile, China (one rural and one industrial site), India, Italy, Trinidad and Tobago, and Turkey.

In rural China and Turkey social media were viewed as a distraction from education. But in industrial China and Brazil they were seen to be an educational resource. Such a divide was evident in India, too. There, high-income families regarded them with suspicion but low-income families advocated them as a supplementary source of schooling. In Britain, meanwhile, they were valued not directly as a means of education, but as a way for pupils, parents and teachers to communicate.

How would you answer if addressed by this study? How do you see social media? Do you see it differently then before?

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Jordan, K. (2017, January 13). When Social Media Are the News | Anthropology-News [American Anthropological Association]. Retrieved from http://www.anthropology-news.org/index.php/2017/01/13/when-social-media-are-the-news/
On a recent visit in 2015, I found the social media landscape dramatically changed, again. Facebook began actively steering reading practices through changes in 2013 to the News Feed algorithm, which determines content in the site’s central feature. That year, Facebook announced an effort to prioritize “high quality content,” defined as timely, relevant, and trustworthy—and not clickbait, memes, or other viral links. This policy, along with changing practices in sharing news content generally, meant that current events can unfold on and through social media.
how much of your news do you acquire through social media? do you trust the information you acquire through social media? #FakeNews – have explored this hashtag? What is your take on fake news? 

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Fournier, S., Quelch, J., & Rietveld, B. (2016, August 17). To Get More Out of Social Media, Think Like an Anthropologist. Retrieved March 17, 2017, from https://hbr.org/2016/08/to-get-more-out-of-social-media-think-like-an-anthropologist 
meaning management :
Anthropologists and the culturally sensitive analysts take complex bits of data and develop a higher-order sense of them. Information and meaning work at cross purposes. In managing meaning, context is everything while in managing information context is error and noise. When we give our social listening projects to information specialists, we lose an appreciation of context and with it the ability to extract the meanings that provide insight for our companies and brands.
Meaning management also involves a deeper appreciation of social listening as a component of a broader meaning-making system, rather than as, simply, a data source to be exploited.
How do you perceive meaning management? Do you see yourself being a professional with the ability to collect, analyze and interpret such data for your company?
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Kraemer, J. (n.d.). Comparing Worlds through Social Media | Platypus. Retrieved from http://blog.castac.org/2016/04/whywepost/
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