Archive of ‘privacy’ category

after tinder

What Comes After Tinder?

By

Eliza, 29, said she’d mostly abandoned using swipe apps for their intended purpose. “Tinder transitioned from being a thing where I actually wanted to meet people to being, ‘I’m bored, tell me I’m pretty,’” she said. “I don’t really meet people on it anymore.”

Talking to women in their 20s and 30s about the ways they avoid swipe burnout (or at least make swiping more pleasant), almost all of them said basically the same thing as Serena, 34: “I can only stand dating apps at this point because I delete them frequently. It feels less like a full-time job that way.” She was contemplating joining Match.com, one of the oldest and most traditional dating sites, in hopes that it might mean sifting through fewer profiles in search of decent, mature people looking to go on real dates.

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more on Tinder in this IMS blog:
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=tinder

more on dating apps in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=dating+apps

student privacy

Report: Tech Companies Are Spying on Children Through Devices and Software Used in Classroom

By Richard Chang 04/17/17

https://thejournal.com/articles/2017/04/17/report-tech-companies-are-spying-on-children-through-devices-and-software-used-in-classroom.aspx

according to a new report from the nonprofit Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF), “Spying on Students: School-Issued Devices and Student Privacy

shows that state and federal laws, as well as industry self-regulation, have failed to keep up with a growing education technology industry.

One-third of all K–12 students in the United States use school-issued devices running software and apps that collect far more information on kids than is necessary.

Resource-poor school districts can receive these tools at deeply discounted prices or for free, as tech companies seek a slice of the $8 billion ed tech industry. But there’s a real, devastating cost — the tracking, cataloging and exploitation of data about children as young as 5 years old.

Our report shows that the surveillance culture begins in grade school, which threatens to normalize the next generation to a digital world in which users hand over data without question in return for free services

EFF surveyed more than 1,000 stakeholders across the country, including students, parents, teachers and school administrators, and reviewed 152 ed tech privacy policies.

“Spying on Students” provides comprehensive recommendations for parents, teachers, school administrators and tech companies to improve the protection of student privacy. Asking the right questions, negotiating for contracts that limit or ban data collection, offering families the right to opt out, and making digital literacy and privacy part of the school curriculum are just a few of the 70-plus recommendations for protecting student privacy contained in the report.

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more on students and privacy
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=student+privacy
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=privacy+government

https://www.privateinternetaccess.com/blog/2017/03/us-senate-votes-50-48-away-broadband-privacy-rules-let-isps-telecoms-sell-internet-history/

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/the-switch/wp/2017/03/28/the-house-just-voted-to-wipe-out-the-fccs-landmark-internet-privacy-protections/?utm_term=.34ed3dce7494

 

CIA hacks

WikiLeaks: Here’s how the CIA hacks your phones, TVs and PCs

The organization released thousands of documents it claims show how the US spy agency can crack open devices from Apple, Samsung, Google and Microsoft.

  https://www.cnet.com/news/wikileaks-cia-hacking-tools-phones-apple-samsung-microsoft-google/

This debate took off when the US Department of Justice sought to require Apple to help it open an encrypted iPhone belonging to one of the San Bernardino shooters. After Apple fought back in court, the FBI said it had obtained another way to access the phone.

Apple, Google and Motorola declined to comment on WikiLeaks’ claims. Samsung didn’t respond to a request for comment.

“The CIA/Wikileaks story today is about getting malware onto phones, none of the exploits are in Signal or break Signal Protocol encryption,” said Moxie Marlinspike, the founder of Signal. “This story isn’t about Signal or WhatsApp, but to the extent that it is, we see it as confirmation that what we’re doing is working.”

Telegram said on its website that the problem lies with operating systems and not encrypted messaging apps and that naming specific encrypted services is “misleading.” WhatsApp declined to comment.

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more on surveillance in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=surveillance

cybersecurity grants

Grant program would support state, local cybersecurity

By Mark Rockwell Mar 02, 2017

https://fcw.com/articles/2017/03/02/state-cyber-bill-rockwell.aspx

The proposed legislation, said the lawmakers, would set up a cybersecurity grant program that would provide resources for states to develop and implement effective cyber resiliency plans, including efforts to identify, detect, protect, respond, and recover from cyber threats. It also would encourage development of a stronger cybersecurity workforce.

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more on cybersecurity in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=cybersecurity

confide app

White House staffers are using this self-destructing messages app to gossip in private — here’s how it works

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more on social media in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=social+media

signal open whisper system

signal app
open whisper system is the company
download from the NPR Marketplace Tech available here:
http://play.podtrac.com/APM-MarketplaceTechReport/play.publicradio.org/rss/d/podcast/marketplace/tech_report/2016/11/16/tech_20161116_pod_64.mp3?siteplayer=true&dl=1

More on the app in the Codebreaker podcast

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more on cybersecurity in this blog:
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=cybersecurity
More on civil disobedience in this blog:
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=civil

 

hack the drones

Hackers are able to seize control of consumer drones and make them fall from the sky

https://plus.google.com/+ScrewMuggz/posts/KMtnAxhMYtc

there aren’t clear rules about what manufacturers need to do to secure drones to prevent them from being tampered with by malicious hackers.

Police have owned signal jamming tools to interfere with consumer drones for years. After all, it was a regular consumer drone that a member of ISIS turned into a kamikaze to bomb Kurdish fighters.

My note: from jamming devices, to raptors (birds) to hacking the apps – #BumpyRoad for drones

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more on drones in this IMS blog:
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=drones

ALA resources for social media in libraries

Social media basics: Engaging your library users

http://www.ala.org/news/press-releases/2014/10/social-media-basics-engaging-your-library-users

Managing Traditional & Social Media for Libraries

http://www.ala.org/pla/onlinelearning/webinars/archive/media

Use of Social Media in the Library

http://www.ala.org/alcts/confevents/upcoming/webinar/121014

Social media has the potential to facilitate much closer relationships between libraries and their patrons. Current usage of social media by the library community generally remains ad hoc and somewhat experimental, but the uptake of these tools is accelerating, and they will likely play an increasingly important role in library service provision and outreach in the future. Taylor & Francis has produced a white paper that analyzes current practices relating social media’s use in the library and how this differs by librarian job role. The sample was taken from academic librarians around the world, which also allows us to examine differences by geographic location. The goal: to establish how librarians are currently using social media in their roles, the most useful social media tools and best applications for these tools in a library setting.

bit.ly/LibrarySM
http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/access/white-paper-social-media.pdf
http://downloads.alcts.ala.org/ce/141012socialmedialibrary_Slides.pdf

Academic Libraries

http://www.ala.org/news/state-americas-libraries-report-2014/academic-libraries

Learn to plan and strategize for ‘A More Effective Social Media Presence’ in new workshop

http://www.ala.org/news/press-releases/2012/08/learn-plan-and-strategize-more-effective-social-media-presence-new-workshop

Using social media to find collaboration, coordination and focus

http://www.ala.org/news/press-releases/2012/11/using-social-media-find-collaboration-coordination-and-focus promotes http://store.elsevier.com/Managing-Social-Media-in-Libraries/Troy-Swanson/isbn-9781780633770/

Rethinking social media to organize information and communities, popular eCourse returns!

http://www.ala.org/news/member-news/2016/02/rethinking-social-media-organize-information-and-communities-popular-ecourse

explores a variety of social media tools in terms of how they can be used to organize information and communities. Together, you will survey and use a variety of social media tools, such as Delicious, Diigo, Facebook, Goodreads, Google Hangouts, LibraryThing, Pinterest, Storify, Twitter, and more! You will also explore how social media tools can be used to organize and disseminate information and how they can be used to foster and sustain communities of learning.

Web_Analytics_Part1–Turning_Numbers_Into_Action–1-20-2011 from Paul Signorelli

In age of Social Media U.S. libraries encourage users to choose privacy

http://www.ala.org/news/news/pressreleases2010/april2010/privacy_pio

User-Generated Content in Library Discovery Systems

http://www.ala.org/advocacy/user-generated-content-library-discovery-systems

With the widespread use of library technology that incorporates social media components, intelligent objects, and knowledge-sharing tools comes the ability of libraries to provide greater opportunities for patron engagement in those discovery systems through user-generated content.  These features may include the ability of users to contribute commentary such as reviews, simple point-and-click rating systems (e.g. one star to five stars), or to engage in extensive discussions or other social interactions. This kind of content could transform authoritative files, alter information architecture, and change the flow of information within the library discovery system.

Privacy Shifting

http://www.ala.org/transforminglibraries/future/trends/privacy

Across generations, concerns for privacy may dissipate with time as specific technologies take hold or as people become aware of a technology’s benefits and value those over their value for privacy.

Library Privacy Guidelines for Students in K-12 Schools

http://www.ala.org/advocacy/library-privacy-guidelines-students-k-12-schools

my note: excellent blueprint for similar activities / policies at higher ed.

your privacy and Google

How to see everything Google knows about you

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more on privacy in this IMS blog

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=privacy

AT&T allows NSA surveillance

New Documents and Reports Confirm AT&T and NSA’s Longstanding Surveillance Partnership

https://www.reddit.com/r/technology/comments/3h64l2/new_documents_and_reports_confirm_att_and_nsas/

Please consider previous IMS blog entries on this topic:

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2014/09/25/online-privacy-its-time-for-a-new-security-paradigm/

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2014/07/01/privacy-and-surveillance-obama-advisor-john-podesta-every-country-has-a-history-of-going-over-the-line/

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