InforMedia Services (IMS)

Technology Instruction for St. Cloud State University

Archive for the 'social media' Category

can a blog be a library web page

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on 4th March 2015

Yes it can and I, Plamen Miltenoff, am trying to convince my esteemed colleagues and administration at LRS to consider educause blog hosted at SCSU as the main vehicle for information. Main consideration is that integrated the blog (as social media) with other social media.
At this point, I have not received an indication that I am even understood what am I proposing. It is that desperate.

MEANWHILE,

ALA offers the following eCourse:

Using WordPress to Build Library Websites

http://www.alastore.ala.org/detail.aspx

it has happened in the past that SCSU money is spent on activity, which I am educated and experienced to deliver. Lets hope that before someone signs for this workshop, h/she might turn fist to me for information.

If you have a desire to bring your departmental Web presence in the 21st century, please feel welcome to contact me.

 

Posted in announcement, Blog, blog, Library and information science, social media | No Comments »

How Students and Schools Use Snapchat

Posted by Julia Robeck on 22nd February 2015

College students love snapchat!

It’s personal, creative, quick, fun, and free.

snapchat

 “According to research by Sumpto…as much as 77 percent of college students use Snapchat every day.

37 percent of the study respondents cited “creativity” as their main use of the app. “Keeping in touch” and “easier than texting” were reasons for 27 percent and 23 percent, respectively.”

Reasons young adults ages 18-26 use snapchat:

  • “I like sharing weird things I see when I’m out…When you get ugly selfies from someone, that’s how you know you’re good friends.”
  • “I only ever use it for funny pictures or to show what I’m doing to my friends, but I have people that use it as a replacement for texting.”
  • “Snapchat is the ultimate social media tool — users want to share their lives to anyone they choose to elicit possible feedback, but without the necessity of it being stored…Snapchat provides an easier answer to Facebook’s ‘What are you doing right now?’ I use it personally to stay in touch with friends and show people what I’m doing.”

Colleges are also starting to get on the bandwagon — Snapchat launched Our Campus Story in October 2014 to four schools.

How Colleges are using snapchat:

  • Orientation: (Tennessee Wesleyan College)  “Where’s Wesley” scavenger hunt
  • Updates: (Tennessee Wesleyan College) Sharing updates about events and activities on campus
  • Recruiting: (Eastern Washington University and the University of Kansas) communicating with young athletes interested in joining their teams

Read more:

http://www.businessinsider.com/why-millennials-use-snapchat-2015-2
http://sproutsocial.com/insights/how-to-use-snapchat-for-colleges/

NPR Marketplace: Snapchat, a $19 Billion Company?

http://www.briansolis.com/2015/02/npr-marketplace-snapchat-19-billion-company/

More IMS blog entries on Snapchat and its use in education:

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/?s=snapchat

Peer-reviewed and popular literature:

Robbins, S. P., & Singer, J. B. (2014). From the editor—The medium is the message: Integrating social media and social work education. Journal Of Social Work Education, 50(3), 387-390.

http://login.libproxy.stcloudstate.edu/login?qurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ebscohost.com%2flogin.aspx%3fdirect%3dtrue%26db%3dpsyh%26AN%3d2014-30405-001%26site%3deds-live%26scope%3dsite

Waxman, O. B. (2014). Snapchat Grows Up: How College Officials Are Using the App. Time.Com, 1.

http://login.libproxy.stcloudstate.edu/login?qurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ebscohost.com%2flogin.aspx%3fdirect%3dtrue%26db%3dkeh%26AN%3d95378280%26site%3deds-live%26scope%3dsite

JO, M. (2014, March 22). Teacher sees value in online connection. Dominion Post, The. p. A2.

http://login.libproxy.stcloudstate.edu/login?qurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ebscohost.com%2flogin.aspx%3fdirect%3dtrue%26db%3dpwh%26AN%3dTDP140322A002182985320-BB%26site%3deds-live%26scope%3dsite

Couros, G. (n.d.). Snapchat and Education. Retrieved from http://georgecouros.ca/blog/archives/4866
Manjaji, R. (2014, June 4). Six Snapchat Experiments to Engage Students. Retrieved February 23, 2015, from http://www.educationpost.com.hk/resources/education/140604-insight-six-snapchat-experiments-to-engage-students
Wiederman, K. (2014, May 2). Snapchat: The Newest Higher Ed Communication Tool | Merge. Retrieved from http://www.mergeagency.com/digital-marketing/snapchat-newest-higher-ed-communication-tool
Privacy and security:

Stretton, T., & Aaron, L. (2015). Feature: The dangers in our trail of digital breadcrumbs. Computer Fraud & Security, 201513-15. doi:10.1016/S1361-3723(15)70006-0

http://login.libproxy.stcloudstate.edu/login?qurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ebscohost.com%2flogin.aspx%3fdirect%3dtrue%26db%3dedselp%26AN%3dS1361372315700060%26site%3deds-live%26scope%3dsite

YOUNG, D. (2014). NOW YOU SEE IT, NOW YOU DON’T… OR DO YOU?: SNAPCHAT’S DECEPTIVE PROMOTION OF VANISHING MESSAGES VIOLATES FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION REGULATIONS. Journal Of Information Technology & Privacy Law, 30(4), 827.
http://login.libproxy.stcloudstate.edu/login?qurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ebscohost.com%2flogin.aspx%3fdirect%3dtrue%26db%3dedo%26AN%3d97348107%26site%3deds-live%26scope%3dsite

Ekman, U. (2015). Complexity of the ephemeral – snap video chats. Empedocles: European Journal For The Philosophy Of Communication, 5(1/2), 97-101. doi:10.1386/ejpc.5.1-2.97_1

http://login.libproxy.stcloudstate.edu/login?qurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ebscohost.com%2flogin.aspx%3fdirect%3dtrue%26db%3dufh%26AN%3d100749050%26site%3deds-live%26scope%3dsite

Flandez, R., & Wallace, N. (2014). Nonprofits Must Guard Against Imposters. Chronicle Of Philanthropy, (09),

http://login.libproxy.stcloudstate.edu/login?qurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ebscohost.com%2flogin.aspx%3fdirect%3dtrue%26db%3dedsgao%26AN%3dedsgcl.364441272%26site%3deds-live%26scope%3dsite

O’Neil, M. (2014). Oh, Snap! A Q&A With DoSomething.org’s Snapchat Strategists. Chronicle Of Philanthropy, (01),

http://login.libproxy.stcloudstate.edu/login?qurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ebscohost.com%2flogin.aspx%3fdirect%3dtrue%26db%3dedsgao%26AN%3dedsgcl.389494463%26site%3deds-live%26scope%3dsite

MESSITT, M. (2014). Cyberbullying Happens in Code. Break It. Education Digest, 79(9), 51.

http://login.libproxy.stcloudstate.edu/login?qurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ebscohost.com%2flogin.aspx%3fdirect%3dtrue%26db%3df5h%26AN%3d95752898%26site%3deds-live%26scope%3dsite

Posted in social media | No Comments »

Stop Using LinkedIn like Facebook

Posted by Julia Robeck on 19th February 2015

Ten signs you’re using LinkedIn like Facebook (and how to stop)

1. A profile picture that won’t get you hired.

Do yourself a favour and click the “People you may know” button and pick something you like that has a little more respectability to it. The same applies for avatars and pictures with someone else other than you in them.

2. A professional headline that is anything but.

Use a description that is both accurate and related to either the benefit you provide or your title within your company. Either way, this is guaranteed to return your profile in some searches.

3. Shameless friend collecting.

It’s a bad first impression. Give people a reason to connect with you and start off on the right foot.

4. Not even really wanting to be friends.

What do you do with all those connections? Do you actively keep in touch? What do you do when you get a message from a contact about business? Do you tut, sigh and ignore them? Fly into a rant about people contacting you on LinkedIn to talk business opportunities?

5. Going all “selly sell” right off the bat.

Do you send spam messages? The LinkedIn inbox delivers into your recipient’s inbox. It might be a warmer and softer way to get noticed but there is no relationship. Better to create rapport by asking questions, sharing content, joining the same group and showing your expertise and counselling side there.

6. Joining groups and not getting involved.

If you join groups and then don’t contribute, you’re partially responsible for the failure of the group. Quickest remedy is to set your group digest emails to once weekly and comment on a few discussions once a week when your email lands.

7. Liking and commenting on absolutely everything.

Liking and commenting on everything works well on Facebook and gives your friends a vanity boost but on LinkedIn less so. Think of it as being at that networking event and you’re the loud self absorbed guy no-one wants to talk to. Not quite so appealing?

8. Sending tweets directly into LinkedIn.

The automatic #in from Twitter was removed several years ago but it doesn’t stop the socially savvy copying and pasting or using a third party like Hootsuite to update multiple platforms at the same time. I do this but do try to tailor the messages to not include @ and #. Are your tweets even relevant to your LinkedIn audience? You’ll see they might jar after a while.

9. Asking people you barely know for endorsements and testimonials.

It’s a bit like asking your Facebook page to be liked but actually more vulgar because they haven’t presumably sampled your expertise yet.

10. Insharing Richard Branson’s (and other influencer) updates.

OK, it’s not Richard’s fault, but my point is, I often get to see what Richard and many others have to see a hundred times in my feed thanks to this piece of functionality. It’s got to Facebook like proportions.

When hundreds of people do the obvious, have the bottle to stay true to yourself and go your own way.

https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/ten-signs-youre-using-linkedin-like-facebook-how-stop-ren%C3%A9-power?trk=prof-post

Posted in social media | No Comments »

social media in the library

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on 18th February 2015

Experts as facilitators for the implementation of social media in the library

Vanwynsberghe, H. )., Boudry, E. )., Verdegem, P. )., & Vanderlinde, R. ). (2014). Experts as facilitators for the implementation of social media in the library? A social network approach. Library Hi Tech, 32(3), 529-545. doi:10.1108/LHT-02-2014-0015

Excellent article. Apparently, they do things differently in Belgium.

“Social media literacy” (SML) can be defined as not only the practical
and critically cognitive competencies possessed by users of social media, but also the
motivation to employ these media effectively and appropriately for social interaction
and communication on the web (Vanwynsberghe and Verdegem, 2013).

Repeated by me numerous times, but ignored consistently.

p. 530 Therefore, the aim of this study is to empirically assess how a social media expert, or the employee with the most knowledge and skills concerning social media, in the library facilitates, or impedes, the information flow and implementation of social media in the library.
p. 541 The findings suggest that such social media experts play a significant role in either supporting or constraining the information flow and implementation of social media.

5.2 A social media expert plays an important role in the library for spreading
information about social media Unsurprisingly, social media experts are the most central actors for giving social media information; they share more social media information with other librarians and rarely receive information in return. Any information they do receive mostly comes from a person skilled in social media use. The social media expert as the central actor in the information network has the power to facilitate or prevent information exchange about social media (Scott and Carrington, 2012).

this is, if the experts are ALLOWED to participate. What if the social media access is usurped by very few others?

even worse, what if the social media is decentralized across?

 

Posted in Digital literacy, Library and information science, media literacy, social media, technology literacy | No Comments »

Facebook censorship

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on 13th February 2015

Facebook’s Internal Dislike Button: Protecting The Brand By Rejecting Unflattering Posts

http://www.ibtimes.com/facebooks-internal-dislike-button-protecting-brand-rejecting-unflattering-posts-1813120

Facebook was in the headlines last summer about their algorithm, when it came out that Twitter algorithm suggested the riots in Missouri in a very different way.
Facebook has been in the headline numerous times regarding their privacy issues
Who is holding a private company responsible about acts like this?Should it be hold responsible?

 

Posted in Facebook | No Comments »

SCSU Tech Survey

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on 13th February 2015

2015.02.13 ITS TechFeeSurvey2014 Presentation

Q14 What technology devices you currently own?

Q15 What technology devices do you plan to purchase in the next year?

Q17 How often do you use the following programs and services?

Posted in educational technology, information technology, instructional technology, mobile learning, online learning, social media, technology literacy | No Comments »

Discussion Boards, Blogs and Wikis

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on 11th February 2015

Differences between Discussion Boards, Blogs and Wikis

http://www.adelaide.edu.au/myuni/staff/resources/tutorials/content/Differences_between_Discussion_Boards__Blogs_and_Wikis.html

Differences

Discussion Forums are TOPIC centred.

  • discussions are organised into topics by ‘threads’
  • anyone in the community can start a thread on a topic of their choosing
  • all participants have an equal voice
  • posts require someone to reply for a discussion to take place
  • you can follow through a thread on a particular topic
Blogs are AUTHOR centred.

  • posts are made by the blog’s author only (may be a group)
  • posts are usually opinion pieces and written in the authors voice
  • readers can add comments to the author’s post
  • organised in reverse chronological order so the most recent posts show on the entry page
  • reflect the authors identity in the tone, look and feel and content
Wikis are CONTENT/DOCUMENT centred.

  • wikis are for group authoring
  • editable website with a complete version history kept
  • aim is to reach a consensus or compromise on the content of the page
  • the focus is the content produced, not the individual authors
  • usually neutral and objective
  • discussion/comment is separated from the wiki content

Posted in blog, Digital literacy, Discussion List, e-learning, instructional technology, online learning, open learning, social media | No Comments »

boost Facebook post

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on 6th February 2015

Boost Your Posts

https://www.facebook.com/help/547448218658012/

—–Original Message—–
From: lkobash88@ucla.edu [mailto:lkobash88@ucla.edu]
Sent: Friday, February 06, 2015 5:34 PM
To: lita-l@lists.ala.org
Subject: [lita-l] Facebook Boosting

Hello! This is for those of you managing library social media accounts:

Has anyone used the boosting option for posts on Facebook?

https://www.facebook.com/help/547448218658012/

My library is experimenting with this and we are not sure how successful it’s been or will be and are wondering if anyone else had had good/bad results from it or knows of libraries that have. Any input is appreciated! Thanks!

Posted in Facebook, social media | No Comments »

research with social media

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on 3rd February 2015

Doctoral Cohorts and Research using Social Media

Explore social media sites to find out what is the most pertinent “talk” in your scientific community. What are the latest trends and discussions, topics of research and interests. Most prominent social media sites, such as
LinkedIn, https://www.linkedin.com/
Twitter, https://twitter.com/
Facebook, https://www.facebook.com/
Pinterest https://www.pinterest.com/
Instagram, http://instagram.com/
use hashtags.
LinkedIn has “professional groups.”

Identify your hashtag strategy similarly to your keyword strategy when searching peer-reviewed articles

  E.g., if your interest is #principalship, you can seek channels and conversations by using it as a hashtag

  Search and subscribe to LinkedIn “Interests/Groups” and lurk or actively participate in the conversations.

  Consider start and maintenance of your own blog with your daily reflections on your research progress

  E.g., LinkedIn can be very much used as a blog, although you can subscribe for a free one such as Edublog

p. 141. Chapter 8 “Using Social Media in Research.”
Bell, J. (1999). Doing your research project: A guide for first-time researchers in education and social science (3rd ed.). Buckingham [England] ; Philadelphia: Open University Press. (Available on Google and at SCSU Library through ILL)

Crowdsourcing, social networking. Consider the following questions:

  1. What are your goals?
  2. Who do you want to reach?
  3. Why do you want to reach them?
  4. Which digital tool or platform will be most effective in enabling you to reach your goals?
  5. If you already spend time each day using social media for personal reasons, how much time are you able to set aside each day to use social media for research?
  6. at what time of day will you engage in social media? (time differences, if you are communicating globally)

the value of social media: Community, Content, Conversations.

 

Davis III, C.H.F., Deil-Amen, R., Rios-Aguilar, C., & González Canché, M.S. Social media and higher education: A literature review and research directions. Report printed by the University of Arizona and Claremont Graduate University. Accessed January 27, 2015 http://works.bepress.com/hfdavis/2/

 

Posted in Digital literacy, educational technology, information literacy, information technology, Library and information science, mobile apps, mobile learning, social media, technology literacy | No Comments »

Visual Social Marketing

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on 3rd February 2015

Visual Social Marketing 101

http://mashable.com/2014/07/17/visual-social-marketing-101/

Snapchat

Of the three platforms, Snapchat is the one marketers may have the most difficult time getting a grip on. The tools are intended to produce clips that are less polished than creatives are used to and the platform isn’t designed for reach.

Vine

Vine is the newest of the three platforms, though many learned of it before Snapchat gained more mainstream attention last year. Vine videos are often whimsical and some even seem effortless, but the most popular users may spend hours or even days creating memorable stop motion videos.

Instagram

Many of the world’s top brands are now on Instagram and for good reason. The social network has more than 200 million users, integrates well with its parent company Facebook and lends itself more to the types of professional photographs and 15-second video spots that marketers are accustomed to.

 

Posted in social media | No Comments »