Archive of ‘teaching’ category

The Show Horse and the Plow Horse Leadership

Leadership: The Show Horse and the Plow Horse

Caleb Gipple

when I say show horse leadership I am not describing an arrogant leader patting themselves on the back for a moment of leadership. Instead, I am describing moments and events of leadership that we have the capacity to personally acknowledge as good leadership. Examples of this would be a situation where you help someone on your team overcome an obstacle or you go out of your way to care for those under your leadership. There is nothing wrong with show horse leadership, in fact, I think it is extremely beneficial to identify when you are doing good leadership so you can make that behavior a trend.

plow horse. To explain, these individuals don’t view him as a leader because he is leading a big initiative or he has a position of authority. They view him this way because of how he makes them feel. I had heard countless individuals explain how he approaches meeting and interactions and it aligns perfectly with Simon Sinek’s idea of a “circle of safety” in his book Leaders Eat Last.

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more on leadership
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=leadership

good boss

Good Bosses Remember to Do These 11 Things Every Day

The best bosses become mentors, and take time to teach others.

https://www.inc.com/the-muse/good-bosses-remember-to-do-these-11-things-everyday.html

We asked 11 people to highlight lessons learned from their favorite managers. No matter what kind of boss you have right now, you can apply these valuable pieces of advice in your own career.

1. Own Your Work

“If she told me how to do it, I would rely on her for every assignment, expecting a 1-2-3 step guide. She was training me to be independent, self-motivated, and take pride in my work,” Chocha says.2. Remember the Goal

3. Listen More

4. Ask for What You Want

5. Focus on the Why

6. Keep Things Moving and Delegate

7. Be Curious

8. Always Carry a Notebook

9. Make Yourself Indispensable

10. Build a Solid Network

11. Do Small Tasks Immediately


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more on leadership in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=leadership

The College Fear Factor

Equity Book Group & D2L Brightspace Course

A Professional Development Opportunity for All Faculty and Staff

What: Statewide opportunity to read, discuss, interact, share and learn with a book on a topic of interest and relevance for our work. This year the topic is improving communication with students and enhancing their sense of belonging.  Created by: Rebecca March and Cheryl Neudauer, Minneapolis College

The book is The College Fear Factor: How Students and Professors Misunderstand Each Other.  Rebecca Cox “spent five years talking to, and watching, community college students. She noted carefully the many ways they failed their classes. She listened closely to their reasons why.” – Jay Mathews, Washington Post blog

https://www.insidehighered.com/news/2009/11/18/college-fear-factor

  1. Three 90-minute virtual Adobe Connect meetings to discuss how the experiences and perspectives in this book relate to our students and communities.  Virtual meetings are scheduled for:
    • Thursday, February 21 – 12:00-1:30 pm 
    • Thursday, March 28 – 12:00-1:30 pm
    • Thursday, April 18 – 12:00-1:30 pm
  2. D2L Brightspace course to explore issues related to communicating with our students both outside of and within the classroom, orally and through our documents, policies, and electronic communications and how these impact their sense of belonging.  The “course” will use short, asynchronous, interactive activities to help us explore how we can better serve our students, connect across the system, and share resources.

 

Your Students Forgot Everything On Your PowerPoint Slides

Why Your Students Forgot Everything On Your PowerPoint Slides

By Mary Jo Madda (Columnist)     Jan 19, 2015

https://www.edsurge.com/news/2015-01-19-why-your-students-forgot-everything-on-your-powerpoint-slides

why instructional design doesn’t typically work with students, or anyone’s learning for that matter, when you teach with PowerPoint—as well as how you can avoid it. It all begins with a little concept called “cognitive load.”

Cognitive load describes the capacity of our brain’s working memory (or WM) to hold and process new pieces of information. We’ve all got a limited amount of working memory, so when we have to handle information in more than one way, our load gets heavier, and progressively more challenging to manage.

In a classroom, a student’s cognitive load is greatly affected by the “extraneous” nature of information—in other words, the manner by which information is presented to them (Sweller, 2010). Every teacher instinctively knows there are better—and worse—ways to present information.

A study in Australia in the late 1990s (the 1999 Kalyuga study) compared the learning achievement of a group of college students who watched an educator’s presentation involving a visual text element and an audio text element (meaning there were words on a screen while the teacher also talked) with those who only listened to a lecture, minus the pesky PowerPoint slides.

It’s called the the redundancy effect. Verbal redundancy “arises from the concurrent presentation of text and verbatim speech,” increasing the risk of overloading working memory capacity—and so may have a negative effect on learning.

Researchers including John Sweller and Kimberly Leslie contend that it would be easier for students to learn the differences between herbivores and carnivores by closing their eyes and only listening to the teacher. But students who close their eyes during a lecture are likely to to called out for “failing to paying attention.”

Richard Mayer, a brain scientist at UC Santa Barbara and author of the book Multimedia Learning, offers the following prescription: Eliminate textual elements from presentations and instead talk through points, sharing images or graphs with students

a separate Australian investigation by Leslie et al. (2012), suggest that mixing visual cues with auditory explanations (in math and science classrooms, in particular) are essential and effective. In the Leslie study, a group of 4th grade students who knew nothing about magnetism and light learned significantly more when presented with both images and a teacher’s explanation than a separate group which received only auditory explanation.

hints:

  • Limit yourself to one word per slide. If you’re defining words, try putting up the vocabulary word and an associated set of images—then challenge students to deduce the definition.
  • Honor the “personalization principle,” which essentially says that engaging learners by delivering content in a conversational tone will increase learning. For example, Richard Mayer suggests using lots of “I’s” and “you’s” in your text, as students typically relate better to more informal language.

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more on Power Point in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=power+point

rural principals

The big jobs of small-town principals

Rural school leaders have some of the most complex roles in education — and some of the highest attrition

by   December 6, 2018

The big jobs of small-town principals

Rural school leaders have some of the most complex, multifaceted jobs in education. They also have some of the highest turnover. Half of all new principals quit their jobs within three years, according to a 2014 study. A national survey released in July found that principals in rural school districts are even less likely than their urban and suburban counterparts to stay at their school the following year and more likely to leave the profession altogether. The schools they preside over, meanwhile, often struggle with persistent povertylow college-going rates and extreme racial disparities in student outcomes.

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more on principals in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=principal

International Journal of Innovative Teaching and Learning in Higher Education

Plamen Miltenoff was selected to serve on the Editorial Review Board (ERB) for the International Journal of Innovative Teaching and Learning in Higher Education (IJITLHE).

“Your term as a board member starts January 2019 and you will be expected to review up to 4 articles a year for the next 2 years. IGI Global advises to have up to 5 reviewers per article, so if the journal were to receive numerous submissions, I may need some volunteers to review additional articles. If that situation were to take place and you would like to be contacted to review more articles, please let me know and I will make a note.”

hi ed leader team

5 SECRETS TO DEVELOPING A HIGH-PERFORMING TEAM IN HIGHER EDUCATION
Patrick Sanaghan & Jillian Lohndorf

https://www.academia.edu/8335887/Ways_to_Improve_Teams_in_Higher_Education

6 POTENTIALLY DESTRUCTIVE MYTHS
#1: THE MYTH ABOUT TALENT
A variety of skills, experiences,and perspectives are necessary,along with high levels of trust, open communication, emotional support, and mutual accountability—all of which arevery hard to establish and maintain. One differentiator of an exceptional team is a high level of curiosity where questions(not hidden criticisms) are prized.

#2: THE MYTH ABOUT FOCUS

stellar teams allocate their time in an unexpected way. They spend two-thirds of their time on thetask at hand (gettin’ ‘er done) and a full one-third on the “process” or relational aspect of the team’s functioning

#3: THE MYTH ABOUT CONFLICT

Exceptional teams see conflict as a resource, not something to be avoided.

Leaders need both the skill and the courage to deal with conflict on their team, as well as the understanding that everyone on the team needs to be involved in its resolution. 

#4: THE MYTH ABOUT OPENNESS

  • the “ seduction of the leader ” syndrome frequently seen in higher education.  Due to the “collegial” and polite nature of most campuses, people simply don’t feel comfortable providing honest feedback,especially if it is negative or critical. 
  • Many people are reluctant to be honest, because it might hurt someone’s feelings. 
  • People don’t want to “lose their seat at the table” and fear that they risk doing so if they are truly honest.
  • People realize that the leader really isn’t open to honest feedback, even as the leader professes to want it

#5: THE MYTH ABOUT SAMENESS

One of the pervasive team dynamics that every team leader needs to be aware of is
“comfortable cloning.”
 This happens when we select people to be on our teams who have similar backgrounds to ours.

#6: THE MYTH ABOUT MOTIVATIONAL METAPHORS

One of the best ways to build a realteam is to have each team membershare their own metaphor for how theywould like the team to operate.

5 STRATEGIES FOR DEVELOPING A STELLAR TEAM

1. Make your team a learning team, by creating an internal article or book club.

2. Define the rules for decision making.

3. Create working agreements or“ground rules” for the functioning and support of the team.

4. Establish a mechanism for regular, anonymous evaluation of team meetings.

5. Conduct a leadership “audit.”

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more on leadership in higher ed in this IMS blog:
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=ed+leader

Teaching history with technology

Teaching history with technology

http://www.edteck.com/dbq/more/analyzing.htm

http://teachingprimarysources.illinoisstate.edu/MCTPS/PD_Guide/Section_4.pdf

https://www.archives.gov/education/lessons/worksheets

https://www.loc.gov/teachers/usingprimarysources/

Analysis worksheets, evidence, and primary documents

https://conference.iste.org/uploads/ISTE2017/HANDOUTS/KEY_108132637/29732_flyer_CP_DocAnaly.pdf

https://www.iste.org/explore/articleDetail?articleid=15&category=Set-the-standard&article=
(see rubric)

https://www.iste.org/docs/excerpts/MEDLIT-excerpt.pdf
(see rubric)

  • Using technology to help students analyze historical/ primary source documents.
  • Making artifacts interactive.
  • Hosting online history discussions
  • The importance of structure and expectations.
  • Using audio in history lessons
  • Recording history with students
  • Hearing history
  • Creating multimedia timelines with students.
  • Simple to complex options for every grade level.
  • Creating multimedia maps
  • Search Strategies for History Students
  • Saving and sharing search results.
  • Google Maps and Earth are not your only options.
  • Creating videos and teaching with video.
  • Making and using virtual tours.
  • Virtual Reality tours.
  • Augmented Reality tours.

Thinglink, Google Expeditions, Poly, 3D printing

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