Archive of ‘technology’ category

jigsaw classroom

https://www.jigsaw.org/

The jigsaw classroom is a research-based cooperative learning technique invented and developed in the early 1970s by Elliot Aronson and his students at the University of Texas and the University of California. Since 1971, thousands of classrooms have used jigsaw with great success.

STEP ONE

Divide students into 5- or 6-person jigsaw groups.

The groups should be diverse in terms of gender, ethnicity, race, and ability.

STEP TWO

Appoint one student from each group as the leader.

Initially, this person should be the most mature student in the group.

STEP THREE

Divide the day’s lesson into 5-6 segments.

For example, if you want history students to learn about Eleanor Roosevelt, you might divide a short biography of her into stand-alone segments on: (1) Her childhood, (2) Her family life with Franklin and their children, (3) Her life after Franklin contracted polio, (4) Her work in the White House as First Lady, and (5) Her life and work after Franklin’s death.

STEP FOUR

Assign each student to learn one segment.

Make sure students have direct access only to their own segment.

STEP FIVE

Give students time to read over their segment at least twice and become familiar with it.

There is no need for them to memorize it.

STEP SIX

Form temporary “expert groups” by having one student from each jigsaw group join other students assigned to the same segment.

Give students in these expert groups time to discuss the main points of their segment and to rehearse the presentations they will make to their jigsaw group.

STEP SEVEN

Bring the students back into their jigsaw groups.

STEP EIGHT

Ask each student to present her or his segment to the group.

Encourage others in the group to ask questions for clarification.

STEP NINE

Float from group to group, observing the process.

If any group is having trouble (e.g., a member is dominating or disruptive), make an appropriate intervention. Eventually, it’s best for the group leader to handle this task. Leaders can be trained by whispering an instruction on how to intervene, until the leader gets the hang of it.

STEP TEN

At the end of the session, give a quiz on the material.

Students quickly come to realize that these sessions are not just fun and games but really count.

Mastery of Library Instruction badge

Greetings all,

From your embedded librarian.

My name is Plamen Miltenoff (https://web.stcloudstate.edu/pmiltenoff/faculty/)  and I am InforMedia Specialist with the SCSU Library (http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/free-tech-instruction/)

Dr. Sivaprakasam and I are developing a microcredentialing system for your class.

The “library” part has several components:

  • One badge for your ability to use the databases and find reliable scientific information in your field (required)
  • One badge for your ability to use social media for a serious, reliable, scientific research (required)
  • One badge for using the D2L “embedded librarian” widget to contact the librarian with questions regarding your class research (optional)
  • One badge for helping class peer with his research (optional)

Collecting two of the required and one of the optional badges let you earn the superbadge “Mastery of Library Instruction.”

The superbadge brings points toward your final grade.

paper handouts workshops Fall 2019 IMS instructional sessions

Mastery in Lib Instruciton badge

instruction

For the remaining of the class, please collect the superbadge                         by:

–       Provide at least 5 peer-reviewed articles regarding your research
to earn the “database” badge 
databases badge
–       Provide proof of participation at least in one LinkedIn professional group from your field

 

–       Either contact the embedded librarian with questions
regarding your research
or-       Provide proof of helping a class peer with their research
or

Link to MS Word document:
https://mnscu-my.sharepoint.com/:w:/r/personal/yg5734wd_minnstate_edu/Documents/conferences%20grants/grants/sharktank/CHEm%20491%20students%20instruction%20lib%20instruction%20badge.docx?d=w3b4c527fe9994b96809d7657017973a3&csf=1&e=RoNggi

Non-Traditional Badge Development

Managing Relationships with Partners in Non-Traditional Badge Development

Live Webcast: October 28, 2019 | 1:00 to 2:00 p.m. Eastern
Webcast Recording: Available 10 business days after the Live Webcast

$450.00

Non-traditional badges represent a growing market full of opportunity. However, you may not be pursuing badges of this type, because you’re not sure how to work with industry partners in development and management. Don’t let that stop you!

Join us for this webcast to learn tips on how to engage with industry partners for non-traditional badge development. We will profile a typical relationship with industry partners and share common pitfalls to avoid.

Michael P. Macklin

Associate Provost for Workforce Partnerships/Development, Colorado Community College System

Michael’s primary focuses are workforce development, noncredit programming, and business partnership development. Through Mr. Macklin’s work with digital badges, he is leveraging the power of digital credential opportunities in advanced manufacturing, healthcare and information technology. He understands that digital badges are key in sustaining and expanding workforce skillsets with community and business partners as this allows for unprecedented access to affordable reskilling and upskilling opportunities. Read Michael’s full bio here.

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more on badges in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=badge

VR Relax

Join mindfulness sessions in VR, and leave refreshed, renewed, and better connected!

MergeCube workshop at SCSU

The best intro to Augmented Reality may be the MergeCube: https://mergevr.com/cube

In 45 min, Mark Gill with the SCSU Vizlab (https://www.facebook.com/SCSUVizLab/), Alan Srock (Astronomy), and Plamen Miltenoff with InforMedia Services (https://www.facebook.com/InforMediaServices/) will guide you through ideas and hands-on setup of the MergeCube in your lesson plans.

When: October 22, 11AM

Where: Miller Center 205 (“how to get” directions here: https://youtu.be/jjpLR3FnBLI )
or join us via Zoom: https://minnstate.zoom.us/my/mergecube

Who: faculty, staff, students interested in exciting new educational technology 

mergecube mark gill

Here is more information about the ed use of MergeCube:
https://youtu.be/Agb3N6B8jHM
https://youtu.be/LRbn79WQEVU
https://youtu.be/OeTUIVhhAXY

AI and XR and Educational Gaming

AI and Mixed Reality Drive Educational Gaming into ‘Boom Phase’

By Dian Schaffhauser 09/16/19

https://campustechnology.com/articles/2019/09/16/ai-and-mixed-reality-drive-educational-gaming-into-boom-phase.aspx

Artificial intelligence and mixed reality have driven demand in learning games around the world, according to a new report by Metaari. A five-year forecast has predicted that educational gaming will reach $24 billion by 2024, with a compound annual growth rate of 33 percent and a quadrupling of revenues. Metaari is an analyst firm that tracks advanced learning technology.

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