Archive of ‘Uncategorized’ category

agility and leadership

Meyers, P. (2015). The Agility Shift: Creating Agile and Effective Leaders, Teams, and Organizations. Retrieved from
book review:
Joiner, W., & Josephs, S. (2007). Leadership Agility: Five Levels of Mastery for Anticipating and Initiating Change. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.
book review:

SCSU MediaSpace

SCSU MediaSpace (AKA Kaltura) versus MnSCU MediaSpace

per Greg Jorgensen (,  MC 118-5, 8-48040), if you house your media (audio, video) materials on the

MnSCU MediaSpace –

you can now consider

SCSU MediaSpace –

What is the difference?

For more information on how to use MediaSpace in your courses, please contact us.

Project-Based Learning in the Online Classroom

Understanding Project-Based Learning in the Online Classroom

By:   February 5th, 2016

Also as a LinkedIn discussion:

the main value of project-based learning is that it teaches students to ask the right questions. Traditional assignments predefine the information that the students will use. Project-based learning puts students into the position of having to determine what information they need by asking the right questions.

The online environment proves yet another benefit in that it allows for the possibility of creating public results, such as a blog or Wikipedia article. You can also create a class wiki to host the projects. Students are far more invested in work that will be seen by many others than they are in the traditional assignment that is seen by nobody other than the teacher.

Finally, project-based learning constitutes a kind of gamification of learning, and thus has the same benefits that are driving the gamification of education movement. Games allow for short-term failure on the way to a goal without long-term cost, multiple paths to success, and just-in-time information within context of a goal (Gee, 2003; Kiang, 2014).

how to tell a story

The Danger of a Single Story

Let’s Begin…

Our lives, our cultures, are composed of many overlapping stories. Novelist Chimamanda Adichie tells the story of how she found her authentic cultural voice — and warns that if we hear only a single story about another person or country, we risk a critical misunderstanding. As you watch Tweet summaries and key phrases of her talk: @ChimamandaSays
customize the story

More on digital storytelling in this IMS blog:

online learning and course design

Online learning can work if universities just rethink the design of their courses

Course design is key to improving student engagement

Training teachers in how to design their courses is key to re-engaging individual students and holding back the tide of dropouts.

Five tips for designing an online course:

  1. State your objective: Each lesson should have one concise, action-oriented learning objective to ensure your lesson design process is focused.
  2. Think as a private tutor: Learners today are inundated with media tailored to them and they expect learning to be tailored as well. So think about how the tools available, including new technologies, will help create meaningful learning moments for all your students.
  3. Storyboard before you build: Being able to see a complete lesson, especially one that integrates various mediums, is essential to creating a successful learning experience.
  4. Build towards high-order thinking: Technology in education can go beyond multiple-choice questions and document repositories. Don’t be afraid to integrate tools that let learners create and share.
  5. Remember you’re learning too: Reviewing learner results from a lesson shouldn’t just be about their score, but also evaluating how effectively the lesson was developed and executed so your teaching can adapt and learn as well.

immersive journalism, games, and empathy

Virtual reality breathes life into immersive storytelling

Virtual Games Try To Generate Real Empathy For Faraway Conflict

James Delahoussaye

Project Syria, a virtual reality experience built by a team of students at USC.

“I sometimes call virtual reality an empathy generator,” she says. “It’s astonishing to me. People all of a sudden connect to the characters in a way that they don’t when they’ve read about it in the newspaper or watched it on TV.”

What Peña’s doing — using virtual reality in combination with reporting — is part of a wider landscape of video games being created to explore the news. And they’re called, appropriately enough, “newsgames.”

“There’s an argument to be made that games are perfect at getting at the systemic problems and challenges in the world,” says Ian Bogost, a professor at Georgia Tech.

He says games are really good at showing the complex underbelly of stories.

Take a game that he helped make called Oil God. In the game, the player controls an oil-rich region, waging wars and inciting coupes. The player learns that oil prices are contingent on all sorts of factors rarely mentioned in a story about the price of a gallon of gas.

The Sociology of Videogames

creating games to bring awareness to social issues for over a decade.  The game to create the biggest waves was arguably MTV’s “Darfur is Dying” released online in 2006, in which players took up the role of a family displaced by conflict in Darfur.

testing in schools

It is on its way out. But not exactly. Can it get more confusing as it is… Apparently, it can…

Obama Administration Calls for Limits on Testing in Schools

Obama Announces End Of ‘No Child Left Behind’ Era: Education Is More Than Tests

why did this administration had to continue the insanity called NCLB from the previous one [for two presidential mandates]?

Reforming No Child Left Behind

One Step Closer to Life After No Child Left Behind

The new law—the Every Child Achieves Act—would give much of that decision-making power back to states. Instead of the feds, state-level officials would determine how to assess academic performance, what counts as a struggling school, and which mechanisms to use to hold educators accountable for achievement. No more top-down reforms. No more mandatory interventions. No more Washington, D.C., bureaucrats stepping on the toes of local policymakers and educators who are much more in tune with their communities’ needs.

Right? Of course not. There’s plenty of important nuance here, and the legislative tug-of-war is just getting started.

Eight problems with Common Core Standards  August 21, 2012


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