Posts Tagged ‘Bryan Alexander’

XR Future Trends

virtual, augmented, mixed, and extended reality, with the help of  brand research.  On Thursday, October 29th, from 2-3 pm EDT, we’ll be joined by Jonathon Richter, Maya Georgieva, and Emory Craig, leaders of the Immersive Learning Research Network’s State of XR and Immersive Learning report.

To RSVP ahead of time, or to jump straight in at 2 pm ET this Thursday, click here:

https://shindig.com/login/event/soxr2020  

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More on XR and Bryan Alexander in this IMS blog
https://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=xr+bryan+alexander

Brian Beatty and HyFlex

On June 25, Brian Beatty was a guest to Bryan Alexander’s “Future Forum.”
He will be a guest again this coming Thursday, September 24, 2020, 1PM Central.
Here is the recording from the June 25th session:
https://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2020/06/25/hyflex-model/

On June 25, it was agreed Brian will bring updates and new developments, considering the pandemic impact on that mode of teaching.

To RSVP ahead of time, or to jump straight in, just click these links:
https://shindig.com/login/event/hyflex2

disorganization of American higher ed

Thursday, August 27, 2PM

To RSVP ahead of time, or to jump straight in at 2 pm EDT this Thursday, click here:

https://shindig.com/login/event/labaree

This week we’re exploring the disorganization of American higher education, and wondering if its chaotic nature is really academia’s superpower.  On Thursday, August 27th, from 2-3 pm EDT we’ll be joined by Stanford University professor David F. Labaree, author of A Perfect Mess: The Unlikely Ascendancy of American Higher Education.Dr. Larabee has devoted his career to the historical sociology of American education, with a particular focus on the role that consumer pressure and markets have had on schooling at all levels.

higher ed fall 2020

SIX SCENARIOS: WHICH ONE WILL YOUR U.S. COLLEGE OR UNIVERSITY EXPERIENCE THIS FALL?

ANTHONY MORETTI

Six scenarios: Which one will your U.S. college or university experience this fall?

  1. Option 1: Shut down for fall
  2. Option 2: Start on ground, finish online
  3. Option 3: Start on line, finish on ground
  4. Option 4: Start on ground, finish on ground
  5. Option 5: Start online, finish online
  6. Option 6: Multiple on ground and online periods

These scenarios omit two critical components of the campus: the many men and women who can’t work from home and extracurricular activities.

Layoffs and furloughs must be the last option; pay cuts/freezes and other cost-saving opportunities must be exhausted before even one person is laid off this fall.

Extracurricular activities must be undertaken with an abundance of caution. Only those activities that are essential and can’t take place virtually must be held. Social distancing must be practiced, no matter the health conditions that exist at the particular time.

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How the Coronavirus Will Change Faculty Life Forever

As the pandemic wears on, expect heavier teaching loads, more service requirements, and more time online

By Bryan Alexander MAY 11, 2020 

https://www.chronicle.com/article/How-the-Coronavirus-Will/248750

(no access to the Chronicle? Not problem: use this link – https://bryanalexander.org/scenarios/two-competing-visions-of-fall-higher-education-plus-a-ghostly-third/)

fall 2020 tech prep by IT_EDUCAUSE


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more on higher ed options for fall 2020 in this IMS blog
https://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=covid

digital media misinformation

Digital Media Has a Misinformation Problem—but It’s an Opportunity for Teaching.

Jennifer Sparrow    Dec 13, 2018

https://www.edsurge.com/news/2018-12-13-digital-media-has-a-misinformation-problem-but-it-s-an-opportunity-for-teaching

https://www.edsurge.com/news/2018-12-13-digital-media-has-a-misinformation-problem-but-it-s-an-opportunity-for-teaching

Research has shown that 50 percent of college students spend a minimum of five hours each week on social media. These social channels feed information from news outlets, private bloggers, friends and family, and myriad other sources that are often curated based on the user’s interests. But what really makes social media a tricky resource for students and educators alike is that most companies don’t view themselves as content publishers. This position essentially absolves social media platforms of the responsibility to monitor what their users share, and that can allow false even harmful information to circulate.

“How do we help students become better consumers of information, data, and communication?” Fluency in each of these areas is integral to 21st century-citizenry, for which we must prepare students.

In English 202C, a technical writing course, students use our Invention Studio and littleBits to practice inventing their own electronic devices, write instructions for how to construct the device, and have classmates reproduce the invention.

The proliferation of mobile devices and high-speed Wi-Fi have made videos a common outlet for information-sharing. To keep up with the changing means of communication, Penn State campuses are equipped with One Button Studio, where students can learn to produce professional-quality video. With this, students must learn how to take information and translate it into a visual medium in a way that will best benefit the intended audience. They can also use the studios to hone their presentation or interview skills by recording practice sessions and then reviewing the footage.
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more on digital media in this IMS blog
https://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=digital+media

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