Posts Tagged ‘Contemplative pedagogy’

school based mindfulness

https://www.kqed.org/mindshift/51308/learning-mindfulness-centered-on-kindness-to-oneself-and-others

Mindfulness has become a core social and emotional learning strategy in the Austin Independent School District (AISD) in Texas. The district has even created a mindfulness specialist position, filled by James Butler, the district’s 2014 Teacher of the Year.

There are various understandings of mindfulness, but most focus on being nonjudgmental and present in the moment.

As part of a presentation at SXSW EDU

Teo, the first-grader, recommends the books “Your Fantastic Elastic Brain”and “Listening to My Body”; the website GoNoodle and Destress Monday, especially the gifs; the apps Stop Breathe & Think Kids and Super Stretch Yoga.

Addison, in fifth grade, recommends the books “What Does It Mean to Be Present?”and “Listening To My Body”; the website GoNoodle and Mind Yeti; the apps Calmand Smiling Mind.

Xavier, the 11th-grader, recommends the books “Cure: A Journey Into Science of Mind Over Body” and “The Happiness Track: How to Apply the Science of Happiness to Accelerate Your Success”; the websites Pocket Mindfulness and UCLA Mindful Awareness Research Center; the apps Calm and Smiling Mind.

For educators seeking to start a mindfulness practice, Butler has a list of recommendations he hands out to educators and a #mindfulAISD YouTube channel.

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more on mindfulness in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=mindfulness

calming strategies against stress

https://www.edsurge.com/news/2018-12-26-teaching-is-as-stressful-as-an-er-these-calming-strategies-can-help

researchers from Penn State say can be as stress-inducing as an emergency room. Teachers enter such an an environment every day, which sometimes feels like life-or-death.

nonprofit program Cultivating Awareness and Resilience in Education (CARE)

half of the students in schools across America have experienced some form of trauma, violence or chronic stress.

After collecting data on those educators’ well-being, observations of classrooms and student behavioral reports over the course of a year, we found that teachers who received emotional regulation training were more emotionally supportive, demonstrated greater sensitivity to student needs, and provided more positive and productive classroom environments. Furthermore, when assessing teachers’ stress levels, those teachers noted considerably less distress, and an improved ability to manage their emotions.

In the face of stressful situations, I instead used techniques like deep breathing and mindful walking to calm my body and mind, gaining that heightened self-awareness to thoughtfully respond to the issue at hand.

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more on stress in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=stress

Well-being, Health, Happiness

The Power of Well-being: Health, Happiness and Success!

 50 mins

https://www.brighttalk.com/webcast/15555/347129

Well-being is more than just living a healthy lifestyle. It is the complex combination of your physical, mental, emotional, and social health factors. Women often focus on the needs of those around them first, putting their own well-being on the back burner. This can result in a range of health issues – both physical and mental.

During this webinar, three experts will provide guidance to help you improve your overall well-being:

– 5 Easy Strategies to Boost Your Happiness at Work – Presented by Shelly Ryan, WHEN BEING and CAREER Advisor®, WHEN Manager

– Well-Being in the Workplace and at Home – Presented by Nancy Friedman, PsyD, Chief Being Officer

– What is Well-Being
The Key Elements of Well-Being
How Well-Being Impacts Your Life
4 Key Tools Proven to Increase Your Well-Being

– Healthy Living and Well-Being – The Art of Loving and Caring for Yourself – Elaine Stewart, ND, WHEN Chief Health Officer

– Finding Your WHEN® – Lisa Miller, VP of Strategic Development & Partner Liaison

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more on mindfulness in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=mindfulness

Cultivating Awareness and Resilience for Educators

Why Teachers Say Practicing Mindfulness Is Transforming The Work

https://www.kqed.org/mindshift/46150/why-teachers-say-practicing-mindfulness-is-transforming-the-work

Christa Turksma, is one of the co-founders of Cultivating Awareness and Resilience for Educators, or CARE for Teachers.

In the last few years, teacher job satisfaction has reportedly plummeted to a 25-year low, and turnover is high — almost 50 percent for new teachers.

In a soon-to-be published study, Jennings and her co-authors provided an extended version of CARE training to 224 teachers in high-poverty schools in New York City, with several two-day sessions spaced over the course of a year.

CARE TECHNIQUES TO TRY IN THE CLASSROOM
Mindfulness for students and teachers

1. Calmer Transitions

2. Take 5

3. Quiet Corner Or Peace Corner

4. Mindful Walking And Centering

yoga as disciplinary tool

Can yoga be used as a disciplinary tool?

Feb. 28, 2018

https://www.educationdive.com/news/can-yoga-be-used-as-a-disciplinary-tool/518049/

Traditional school discipline policies based on behaviorist principles are not well-supported by research, some educators say. And zero-tolerance policies are now viewed by most educators as more harmful than beneficial because of their association with the school-to-prison pipeline. New strategies, such as mindfulness and the practice of yoga, are gaining popularity in some areas as replacements for traditional discipline for minor infractions.

Advocates of yoga in schools claim that the practice does more than provide a way to reduce stress and improve self-control. Yoga also improves the mind/body connection, encourages a healthy and fit lifestyle and improves emotional health as well. Contracting with yoga instructors to provide a few classes a week may be a relatively inexpensive way to deal with some behavior issues.

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more on mindfulness in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=mindfulness

contemplative computing, contemplative pedagogy and getting “unplugged”

Mark Zuckerberg’s Sister Published A Book About A Child Whose Mom Takes Her iPad Away
http://www.businessinsider.com/randi-zuckerbergs-kids-book-dot-2013-11#ixzz2jmchiAAf

social media etiquette

unplug

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/11/03/books/review/randi-zuckerbergs-dot-complicated-and-dot.html

Contemplative Pedagogy and Dealing with Technology
Dan Barbezat, Amherst College; David Levy, University of Washington

https://docs.google.com/viewer?pid=sites&srcid=cG9kbmV0d29yay5vcmd8d2lraXBvZGlhfGd4OjY4MDVkOTRlNGQyODY0ZjY&docid=9ffbca34d1874ac24b0a339bd01f94cf%7Cbeba8a8cdb041811cbd3136e0fdbd53b&a=bi&pagenumber=45&w=800

The accelerating pace of life is reducing the time for thoughtful reflection and in particular for contemplative scholarship, within the academy. The loss of time to think is occurring at exactly the moment when scholars, educators, and students have gained access to digital tools of great value to scholarship. This interactive session reviews research on technology’s impacts and demonstrates some contemplative practices that can respond to them. Contemplative pedagogy can offset the distractions of our multi-tasking, multi-media culture, and show how the needs of this generation of students can be met through innovative teaching methods that integrate secular practices of contemplation.

Topics: Faculty Professional Development, Teaching & Learning

Walking the Labyrinth: Contemplative Instructional Techniques to Enhance Learner Engagement
Carol Henderson and Janice Monroe, Ithaca College

Bringing ancient traditional meditative skills into the contemporary classroom, con-templative learning techniques serve as an effective counterbalance to the speedi-ness and distractions of today’s fast-paced technology-based cultural environment.  Applicable to both faculty development programs and to faculty working directlywith students, contemplative methods create a richer, more engaging learningenvironment by allowing participants to quiet their minds and focus deeply on the material at hand. This interactive session provides instruction and practice in con-templative techniques, offers examples of their use, and supports the integration of these techniques into any discipline or subject area.

Topics: Faculty Professional Development, Teaching & Learning

Contemplative Computing and Our Future of Education

Alex Soojung-Kim Pang, Stanford University

A generation of educators have spent their professional lives hearing that technol-
ogy is changing the world, transforming the way we think, and that higher educa-
tion must evolve or become obsolete. In case you didn’t get the message in the

1960s and 1970s, with cassette tapes, television and mainframe computers, it was

repeated in the 1980s when personal computers appeared; repeated again in the

1990s, with CD-ROMs (remember those) and the World Wide Web; repeated again

in the early 2000s with blogs and wikis; and recently, repeated once again in the

wake of social media, YouTube and the real-time Web.

This language of technological revolution and institutional reaction is backward. It

gives too much credit and agency to technology, and makes today’s changes seem

unprecedented and inevitable. Neither is actually true. Contemplative computing—

the effort to design technologies and interactions that aren’t perpetually demanding

and distracting, but help users be more mindful and focused—provides a language

for talking differently about the place of technology in teaching, learning, and edu-
cation. We think of today’s technologies as uniquely appealing to our reptilian, dopa-
mine- and stimulation-craving brains. In reality, distraction is an ancient problem,

and the rise of contemplative practices and institutions (most notably monasteries

and universities) is a response to that problem. Abandoning our traditional role as

stewards of contemplative life is as dangerous for the societies we serve as it is

short-sighted and counterproductive. Contemplative computing argues that even

today, people have choices about how to interact with technologies, how to use

them, and how to make the parts of our extended minds; and that part of our job

as educators is to show students how to exercise that agency.