Posts Tagged ‘Digital Storytelling’

VR Manga and Immersive Storytelling

VR Manga Is The Immersive Storytelling You Didn’t Know You Wanted

Project Hikari: Tales of the Wedding Rings lets you walk into a manga and become part of the story.

Japanese company Square Enix is looking to broaden the VR storytelling conversation by bringing 3 genres together into one incredible VR experience with Project Hikari: Tales of the Wedding Rings,

“We wanted to do something differently with this technology—we wanted to take VR into a different kind of direction,” Sou told VRScout in an interview. “We asked ourselves: how do we make content that is really unique, and something only our company can do?”

The team realized that manga could provide a creative new avenue of immersive story. Their approach was to create a style that blends animation and comic—giving you the ability to move in and out of panels. Sometimes you can see a range of still panels, others you’re engulfed in the animation of one scene.

I worried that the linear narrative of the manga might interfere with the immersion of VR, or that voiceover narration would keep me from discovering aspects of the story myself.

That worry was completely eliminated almost immediately the moment I put the headset on and the experience began. The Square Enix team was very creative with how they used narration along with the animation within the panels to bring the experience to life. I loved this VR take on the manga, and found Tales of the Wedding Rings to be an incredible experience that honored both mediums.

It’s a cross-section of a lot of different mediums because you have VR, manga (comics), and animation

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more on digital storytelling in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=digital+storytelling

storytelling meets fake news

‘School For Good And Evil’ Is A Kids’ Fantasy Series For The Fake News Era

September 18, 20174:45 PM ET 
http://www.npr.org/2017/09/18/550797568/school-for-good-and-evil-is-a-kids-fantasy-series-for-the-fake-news-era

There’s a YouTube channel, an interactive website with t-shirt giveaways and character contests, Instagrams, dramatic book trailers. Universal Pictures bought the rights to the series pretty much as soon as the first book was published.

The power of a lie that feels true and drives people’s behavior is at the heart of the book — a theme that feels very now.

 

Large-scale visualization

The future of collaboration: Large-scale visualization

 http://usblogs.pwc.com/emerging-technology/the-future-of-collaboration-large-scale-visualization/

More data doesn’t automatically lead to better decisions. A shortage of skilled data scientists has hindered progress towards translation of information into actionable business insights. In addition, traditionally dense spreadsheets and linear slideshows are ineffective to present discoveries when dealing with Big Data’s dynamic nature. We need to evolve how we capture, analyze and communicate data.

Large-scale visualization platforms have several advantages over traditional presentation methods. They blur the line between the presenter and audience to increase the level of interactivity and collaboration. They also offer simultaneous views of both macro and micro perspectives, multi-user collaboration and real-time data interaction, and a limitless number of visualization possibilities – critical capabilities for rapidly understanding today’s large data sets.

Visualization walls enable presenters to target people’s preferred learning methods, thus creating a more effective communication tool. The human brain has an amazing ability to quickly glean insights from patterns – and great visualizations make for more efficient storytellers.

Grant: Visualizing Digital Scholarship in Libraries and Learning Spaces
Award amount: $40,000
Funder: Andrew W. Mellon Foundation
Lead institution: North Carolina State University Libraries
Due date: 13 August 2017
Notification date: 15 September 2017
Website: https://immersivescholar.org
Contact: immersivescholar@ncsu.edu

Project Description

NC State University, funded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, invites proposals from institutions interested in participating in a new project for Visualizing Digital Scholarship in Libraries and Learning Spaces. The grant aims to 1) build a community of practice of scholars and librarians who work in large-scale multimedia to help visually immersive scholarly work enter the research lifecycle; and 2) overcome technical and resource barriers that limit the number of scholars and libraries who may produce digital scholarship for visualization environments and the impact of generated knowledge. Libraries and museums have made significant strides in pioneering the use of large-scale visualization technologies for research and learning. However, the utilization, scale, and impact of visualization environments and the scholarship created within them have not reached their fullest potential. A logical next step in the provision of technology-rich, visual academic spaces is to develop best practices and collaborative frameworks that can benefit individual institutions by building economies of scale among collaborators.

The project contains four major elements:

  1. An initial meeting and priority setting workshop that brings together librarians, scholars, and technologists working in large-scale, library and museum-based visualization environments.
  2. Scholars-in-residence at NC State over a multi-year period who pursue open source creative projects, working in collaboration with our librarians and faculty, with the potential to address the articulated limitations.
  3. Funding for modest, competitive block grants to other institutions working on similar challenges for creating, disseminating, validating, and preserving digital scholarship created in and for large-scale visual environments.
  4. A culminating symposium that brings together representatives from the scholars-in-residence and block grant recipient institutions to share and assess results, organize ways of preserving and disseminating digital products produced, and build on the methods, templates, and tools developed for future projects.

Work Summary
This call solicits proposals for block grants from library or museum systems that have visualization installations. Block grant recipients can utilize funds for ideas ranging from creating open source scholarly content for visualization environments to developing tools and templates to enhance sharing of visualization work. An advisory panel will select four institutions to receive awards of up to $40,000. Block grant recipients will also participate in the initial priority setting workshop and the culminating symposium. Participating in a block grant proposal does not disqualify an individual from later applying for one of the grant-supported scholar-in-residence appointments.
Applicants will provide a statement of work that describes the contributions that their organization will make toward the goals of the grant. Applicants will also provide a budget and budget justification.
Activities that can be funded through block grants include, but are not limited to:

  • Commissioning work by a visualization expert
  • Hosting a visiting scholar, artist, or technologist residency
  • Software development or adaptation
  • Development of templates and methodologies for sharing and scaling content utilizing open source software
  • Student or staff labor for content or software development or adaptation
  • Curricula and reusable learning objects for digital scholarship and visualization courses
  • Travel (if necessary) to the initial project meeting and culminating workshop
  • User research on universal design for visualization spaces

Funding for operational expenditures, such as equipment, is not allowed for any grant participant.

Application
Send an application to immersivescholar@ncsu.edu by the end of the day on 13 August 2017 that includes the following:

  • Statement of work (no more than 1000 words) of the project idea your organization plans to develop, its relationship to the overall goals of the grant, and the challenges to be addressed.
  • List the names and contact information for each of the participants in the funded project, including a brief description of their current role, background, expertise, interests, and what they can contribute.
  • Project timeline.
  • Budget table with projected expenditures.
  • Budget narrative detailing the proposed expenditures

Selection and Notification Process
An advisory panel made up of scholars, librarians, and technologists with experience and expertise in large-scale visualization and/or visual scholarship will review and rank proposals. The project leaders are especially keen to receive proposals that develop best practices and collaborative frameworks that can benefit individual institutions by building a community of practice and economies of scale among collaborators.

Awardees will be selected based on:

  • the ability of their proposal to successfully address one or both of the identified problems;
  • the creativity of the proposed activities;
  • relevant demonstrated experience partnering with scholars or students on visualization projects;
  • whether the proposal is extensible;
  • feasibility of the work within the proposed time-frame and budget;
  • whether the project work improves or expands access to large-scale visual environments for users; and
  • the participant’s ability to expand content development and sharing among the network of institutions with large-scale visual environments.

Awardees will be required to send a representative to an initial meeting of the project cohort in Fall 2017.

Awardees will be notified by 15 September 2017.

If you have any questions, please contact immersivescholar@ncsu.edu.

–Mike Nutt Director of Visualization Services Digital Library Initiatives, NCSU Libraries
919.513.0651 http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/do/visualization

 

Digital Storytelling for EDAD 652

Community Relations for Administrators EDAD 652

Instructor Kay Worner

A discussion with Kay’s class of school administrators about the use of digital storytelling as a tool for community relations.

discussion based on LIB 490/590
http://web.stcloudstate.edu/pmiltenoff/lib490/

  • Introduction (5-10 min)
    Plamen: http://web.stcloudstate.edu/pmiltenoff/faculty/
    students: interests and related information
  • Group assignment (5-10 min)
    Effective communication strategies. List 3-5 and discuss the pros and cons (what makes them effective and are there any impediments, limitations)
  • Class discussion on effective communication strategies: based on the group work findings, how do you think digital storytelling may be [can it be] an effective communication tool

What is Storytelling? How does it differ from Digital Storytelling?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Digital_storytelling

Rossiter & Garcia (2010)  consider “digital stories are short vignettes that combine the art of telling stories with multimedia objects including images, audio, and video” (p. 37)

Is Digital Storytelling more then just storytelling on technology steroids?

What is Digital Storytelling (DS) for school leadership? A bibliographic research reveals a plenitude of research on DS in the classroom, for educators, but not much for educational leaders.
Guajardo, Oliver, Rodrigez, Valcez, Cantu, & Guajardo (2011) view digital storytelling for emerging educational leaders as “as a process for data creation, analysis, and synthesis.”

There is information for corporate leaders or community leaders and DS, but not much for ed leaders.

Let’s create our own understanding of digital storytelling for educational leaders.

Basic definitions, concepts and processes.

  • Learn about Web 1.0 versus Web 2.0; the Cloud; transliteracy and multiliteracy

Multimodal Literacy refers to meaning-making that occurs through the reading, viewing, understanding, responding to and producing and interacting with multimedia and digital texts. It may include oral and gestural modes of talking, listening and dramatising as well as writing, designing and producing such texts. The processing of modes, such as image, words, sound and movement within texts can occur simultaneously and is often cohesive and synchronous. Sometimes specific modes may dominate.

http://guides.library.stonybrook.edu/digital-storytelling

  • Social Media and digital storytelling
    which social media tools would you employ to ensure a digital story happening?

When you hear the term, Digital Storytelling, do you immediately consider Social Media?

IT’S A MINDSET – NOT A SKILL
http://turndog.co/2015/06/16/how-to-use-social-media-in-your-digital-storytelling/

Share Your Brand’s (School?) Story
https://www.postplanner.com/digital-storytelling-techniques-secret-sauce-social-media/

  • group work (15-20) min
    split in groups of 3: an ed leader, a media specialist (or teacher with technology background) and a teacher (to represent a school committee on community relations)
    you have 5 min to research (Internet, access to school resources) and 5-10 min to come up with a strategy for use of digital storytelling for expanding and improving community relationship
    Base your strategy on existing examples.
    E.g.:
    Do the following electronic resources regarding this particular educational institution relay digital story:
    http://strideacademy.org/
    https://www.facebook.com/StrideAcademy/
    https://twitter.com/search?q=Stride%20Academy%20Charter%20School&src=tyah
    https://youtu.be/eekIUqMQ4v0
    What do you like?
    What would you do differently?
  • Digital Storytelling for building, expanding, improving community relations – final thoughts

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literature:
Rossiter, M., & Garcia, P. A. (2010). Digital storytelling: A new player on the narrative field.
New Directions For Adult & Continuing Education, 2010(126), 37-48.
http://login.libproxy.stcloudstate.edu/login?qurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ebscohost.
com%2flogin.aspx%3fdirect%3dtrue%26db%3daph%26AN%3d51532202%26
site%3dehost-live%26scope%3dsite

Guajardo, M., Oliver, J. A., Rodriguez, G., Valadez, M. M., Cantu, Y., & Guajardo, F. (2011). Reframing the Praxis of School Leadership Preparation through Digital Storytelling. Journal Of Research On Leadership Education, 6(5), 145-161.
http://login.libproxy.stcloudstate.edu/login?qurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ebscohost.com%2flogin.aspx%3fdirect%3dtrue%26db%3deric%26AN%3dEJ958883%26site%3dehost-live%26scope%3dsite

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more on digital storytelling in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=digital+storytelling

digital literacy and the workplace

Digital Literacy and Preparing Students for the Workforce

Posted by Catie Peiper on May 16, 2016

Digital Technology Is Changing the Career Landscape

  1. People are living longer.
  2. Technology can now augment and extend our own abilities.
  3. Daily life is now computational as innovations in sensors and processing make our world a programmable system.
  4. Our new media ecology and advances in communications systems require media literacies beyond text.
  5. Social technologies are driving new forms of production and value creation.
  6. Our world is now globally connected, highlighting diversity and adaptability.

Digital Literacy Is a Professional Competency

media-rich education, including interactive approaches such as digital storytelling or remix education, ensures that students are familiar with modern tools and “natural language” modes of expression. We are increasingly moving into what many scholars consider a post-literate world, one in which images, video, and the written or spoken word are used fluidly together, symbiotically, to communicate increasingly complex concepts. Modern rhetoric now includes TED talks, animated lectures, visual essays, and a plethora of other interactive and dynamic multimedia.

Smart Classrooms = Smart Workers

ten, technology-oriented strengths as “must haves” for future employers:

  1. An ability to determine deeper meaning or significance of what is being expressed via all mediums.
  2. An ability to connect with others in a meaningful and direct way via modern technologies and our global networks.
  3. A proficiency in problem-solving and critical analysis, especially when working with digital relationships or data.
  4. An ability to adapt to different cultural settings and modalities, necessitated by our global media ecosystem.
  5. An ability to translate specific information and data into abstracts while understanding the underlying reasoning.
  6. An ability to critically assess and develop content that uses evolving digital media, leveraging these tools for direct and persuasive communication.
  7. A transdisciplinary, multimedia mindset that eschews specialized or localized intelligences.
  8. A design or goal-oriented mindset that employs systems thinking and that develops tasks and work processes towards a desired outcome.
  9. An ability to discriminate and filter both digital and analog information for importance, while maximizing cognitive and productivity efficiencies.
  10. An ability to work productively and innovatively via virtual collaboration.

Digital Backpack, is certainly one of the first steps, as is developing an educational framework within which students can meanfully and productively interrogate our technologically driven world.

To learn more about incorporating media in the classroom, download Digital Literacy On-Demand: Visualizing Best Practices in Higher Education, our guide to best practices for multimodal learning and digital media on campus.

 

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More on digital literacy in this IMS blog:
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=digital+literacy

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more on digital storytelling in this IMS blog:
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=digital+storytelling

10 Social Media Apps in 2016

10 Social Media Apps You Should Be Using in 2016 (But Probably Aren’t)

https://blog.hootsuite.com/best-social-media-apps-list/

The Roll

The Roll app will help you make sure your images are the best they can be. The Roll analyzes your photos, rates them on a zero to 100 scale, and adds keywords for easy search (much like Google Photos).

The Roll has more features than I have time to write about it here. Just do yourself a favor and check it out. Your visual content will thank you.

Download The Roll for iPhone

Tuurnt

Tuurnt is a social media app and platform following in the ephemeral footsteps of Snapchat. Giving users 24 hours to respond to photos and videos, Tuurnt turns regular visual posts into social events where participation and contribution from both known contacts and public users is encouraged.

Storehouse

The app allows you to take photos and videos from your phone’s camera roll (or from Instagram, Flickr, and Dropbox) to create a shareable “story.”

Yubl

Yubl’s success can be attributed to not only the highly detailed interface, but the three main areas of the user experience. “Private” is for one-on-one or invite-only group, ‘Public’ is an open forum across the entire social network (including brands and celebrities), and ‘Explore’ is for searching and finding other users such as brands and celebrities.

Rex

share your favorite movies, music, books, TV shows, videos, restaurants, bars, travel destinations, and anything else you like.

Firef.ly

plan your trips, acts as a guide, encourages you to capture moments along the way, and then ‘relive’ your experiences.

Download Firef.ly for iPhone

Venmo

send and receive money free of charge, transfer to your bank, and checkout on other apps with just one touch.

Interact

Create, delete, and manage contact groups for easy, quick communication with teams, friends, and family. iOS only

Quik

Quik allows users to create stylized videos with just a few taps on their mobile devices. Once your video is done, you can post directly to your social media accounts through Quik.
my note. compare Quik to other video editing free tools for mobiles: http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2016/01/21/video-editing-for-mobile-devices/

Pushbullet

The app bridges the gap between your phone and computer, and, as Gizmodo explains, “automatically sends all your phone notifications over to your computer in the form of little windows.

 

how to tell a story

The Danger of a Single Story

Let’s Begin…

Our lives, our cultures, are composed of many overlapping stories. Novelist Chimamanda Adichie tells the story of how she found her authentic cultural voice — and warns that if we hear only a single story about another person or country, we risk a critical misunderstanding. As you watch Tweet summaries and key phrases of her talk: @ChimamandaSays
customize the story


More on digital storytelling in this IMS blog:

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/?s=digital+storytelling&submit=Search

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