Posts Tagged ‘fake news #FakeNews’

weaponizing the web RT hybrid war

Fake news and botnets: how Russia weaponised the web

https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2017/dec/02/fake-news-botnets-how-russia-weaponised-the-web-cyber-attack-estonia

The digital attack that brought Estonia to a standstill 10 years ago was the first shot in a cyberwar that has been raging between Moscow and the west ever since

It began at exactly 10pm on 26 April, 2007, when a Russian-speaking mob began rioting in the streets of Tallinn, the capital city of Estonia, killing one person and wounding dozens of others. That incident resonates powerfully in some of the recent conflicts in the US. In 2007, the Estonian government had announced that a bronze statue of a heroic second world war Soviet soldier was to be removed from a central city square. For ethnic Estonians, the statue had less to do with the war than with the Soviet occupation that followed it, which lasted until independence in 1991. For the country’s Russian-speaking minority – 25% of Estonia’s 1.3 million people – the removal of the memorial was another sign of ethnic discrimination.

That evening, Jaan Priisalu – a former risk manager for Estonia’s largest bank, Hansabank, who was working closely with the government on its cybersecurity infrastructure – was at home in Tallinn with his girlfriend when his phone rang. On the line was Hillar Aarelaid, the chief of Estonia’s cybercrime police.

“It’s going down,” Aarelaid declared. Alongside the street fighting, reports of digital attacks were beginning to filter in. The websites of the parliament, major universities, and national newspapers were crashing. Priisalu and Aarelaid had suspected something like this could happen one day. A digital attack on Estoniahad begun.

“The Russian theory of war allows you to defeat the enemy without ever having to touch him,” says Peter Pomerantsev, author of Nothing is True and Everything is Possible. “Estonia was an early experiment in that theory.”

Since then, Russia has only developed, and codified, these strategies. The techniques pioneered in Estonia are known as the “Gerasimov doctrine,” named after Valery Gerasimov, the chief of the general staff of the Russian military. In 2013, Gerasimov published an article in the Russian journal Military-Industrial Courier, articulating the strategy of what is now called “hybrid” or “nonlinear” warfare. “The lines between war and peace are blurred,” he wrote. New forms of antagonism, as seen in 2010’s Arab spring and the “colour revolutions” of the early 2000s, could transform a “perfectly thriving state, in a matter of months, and even days, into an arena of fierce armed conflict”.

Russia has deployed these strategies around the globe. Its 2008 war with Georgia, another former Soviet republic, relied on a mix of both conventional and cyber-attacks, as did the 2014 invasion of Crimea. Both began with civil unrest sparked via digital and social media – followed by tanks. Finland and Sweden have experienced near-constant Russian information operations. Russian hacks and social media operations have also occurred during recent elections in Holland, Germany, and France. Most recently, Spain’s leading daily, El País, reported on Russian meddling in the Catalonian independence referendum. Russian-supported hackers had allegedly worked with separatist groups, presumably with a mind to further undermining the EU in the wake of the Brexit vote.

The Kremlin has used the same strategies against its own people. Domestically, history books, school lessons, and media are manipulated, while laws are passed blocking foreign access to the Russian population’s online data from foreign companies – an essential resource in today’s global information-sharing culture. According to British military researcher Keir Giles, author of Nato’s Handbook of Russian Information Warfare, the Russian government, or actors that it supports, has even captured the social media accounts of celebrities in order to spread provocative messages under their names but without their knowledge. The goal, both at home and abroad, is to sever outside lines of communication so that people get their information only through controlled channels.

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24-hour Putin people: my week watching Kremlin ‘propaganda channel’ RT

https://www.theguardian.com/media/2017/nov/29/24-hour-putin-people-my-week-watching-kremlin-propaganda-channel-rt-russia-today

 Wednesday 29 November 2017 

According to its detractors, RT is Vladimir Putin’s global disinformation service, countering one version of the truth with another in a bid to undermine the whole notion of empirical truth. And yet influential people from all walks of public life appear on it, or take its money. You can’t criticise RT’s standards, they say, if you don’t watch it. So I watched it. For a week.

Suchet, the son of former ITV newsreader John Suchet and the nephew of actor David Suchet, has been working for RT since 2009. The offspring of well-known people feature often on RT. Sophie Shevardnadze, who presents Sophie & Co, is the granddaughter of former Georgian president and Soviet foreign minister Eduard ShevardnadzeTyrel Ventura, who presents Watching the Hawks on RT America, is the son of wrestler-turned-politician Jesse Ventura. His co-host is Oliver Stone’s son Sean.

My note; so this is why Oliver Stone in his “documentary” went gentle on Putin, so his son can have a job. #Nepotism #FakeNews

RT’s stated mission is to offer an “alternative perspective on major global events”, but the world according to RT is often downright surreal.

Peter Pomerantsev, author of Nothing Is True and Everything Is Possible, about Putin’s Russia, and now a senior visiting fellow in global affairs at the London School of Economics, was in Moscow working in television when Russia Today first started hiring graduates from Britain and the US. “The people were really bright, they were being paid well,” he says. But they soon found they were being ordered to change their copy, or instructed how to cover certain stories to reflect well on the Kremlin. “Everyone had their own moment when they first twigged that this wasn’t like the BBC,” he says. “That, actually, this is being dictated from above.” The coverage of Russia’s war with Georgia in 2008 was a lightbulb moment for many, he says. They quit.

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more on Russian bots, trolls:
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2017/11/22/bots-trolls-and-fake-news/

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more on state propaganda in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2017/11/21/china-of-xi/

China of Xi

Time of Xi



My note: CCTV (http://english.cctv.com/), accidentally overlaps with cctv (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Closed-circuit_television): “also known as video surveillance”

China Central Television (formerly Beijing Television), commonly abbreviated as CCTV, is the predominant state television broadcaster in the People’s Republic of China. CCTV has a network of 50 channels broadcasting different programmes and is accessible to more than one billion viewers.[1] As of present, there are 50 television channels, and the broadcaster provides programming in six different languages. Most of its programmes are a mixture of news, documentary, social education, comedy, entertainment, and drama, the majority of which consists of Chinese soap operas and entertainment.[2]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/China_Central_Television

CCTV is one of the official mouthpieces of the Communist Party of China, and is part of what is known in China as the “central three” (中央三台), with the others being China National Radio and China Radio International.

Fake news and CCTV

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/China_Central_Television

https://blogs.wsj.com/chinarealtime/2014/03/28/china-targets-fake-news/

http://ascportfolios.org/chinaandmedia/2011/01/31/fake-news-in-the-news/

https://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/united-states-china-fake-news_us_592494d5e4b00c8df29f88d7

CCTV mentioned positively: http://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-china-22424129

manufacturing consent

https://politicsmeanspolitics.com/fake-news-is-just-another-form-of-manufacturing-consent-e8ebc0b6d971

https://www.byline.com/column/3/article/7

http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/0267323102017002691

http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/0267323114564758

https://www.omicsonline.org/open-access/a-critique-of-edward-herman-and-noam-chomskys-manufacturingconsent-the-political-economy-of-mass-media-2168-9717-1000176.pdf

http://www.rollingstone.com/politics/features/matt-taibbi-on-the-death-of-edward-herman-w511766


media literacy part of digital citizenship

Making Media Literacy Central to Digital Citizenship

that kind of tech — expensive, bleeding-edge tools — makes headlines but doesn’t make it into many classrooms, especially the most needy ones. What does, however, is video.

68 percent of teachers are using video in their classrooms, and 74 percent of middle schoolers are watching videos for learning.

Video is a key aspect of our always-online attention economy that’s impacting votingbehavior, and fueling hate speech and trolling. Put simply: Video is a contested civic space.

We need to move from a conflation of digital citizenship with internet safety and protectionism to a view of digital citizenship that’s pro-active and prioritizes media literacy and savvy.

equip students with some essential questions they can use to unpack the intentions of anything they encounter. One way to facilitate this thinking is by using a tool like EdPuzzle

We need new ways of thinking that are web-specific. Mike Caulfield’s e-book is a great deep dive into this topic, but as an introduction to web literacy you might first dig into the notion of reading “around” as well as “down” media — that is, encouraging students to not just analyze the specific video or site they’re looking at but related content (e.g., where else an image appears using a reverse Google image search).

Active viewing — engaging more thoughtfully and deeply with what you watch — is a tried-and-true teaching strategy for making sure you don’t just watch media but retain information.

For this content, students shouldn’t just be working toward comprehension but critique; they need to not just understand what they watch, but also have something to say about it. One of my favorite techniques for facilitating this more dialogic and critical mode of video viewing is by using aclassroom backchannel, like TodaysMeet, during video viewings

only 3 percent of the time tweens and teens spend using social media is focused on creation

There are a ton of options out there for facilitating video creation and remix, but two of my favorites are MediaBreaker and Vidcode.

The Anti-Defamation League and Teaching Tolerance have lesson plans that connect to both past and present struggles, and one can also look to the co-created syllabi that have sprung up around Black Lives MatterCharlottesville, and beyond. Pair these resources with video creation tools,

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more on media literacy in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=media+literacy

more on digital citizenship in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=digital+citizenship

academic dishonesty plagiarism in the digital age

Ercegovac, Z., & Richardson, J. J. (2004). Academic Dishonesty, Plagiarism Included, in the Digital Age: A Literature Review. College & Research Libraries65(4), 301-318.

http://login.libproxy.stcloudstate.edu/login?qurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ebscohost.com%2flogin.aspx%3fdirect%3dtrue%26db%3dllf%26AN%3d502931540%26site%3dehost-live%26scope%3dsite

what constitutes plagiarism, how prevalent plagiarism is in our schools, colleges, and society, what is done to prevent and reduce plagiarism, the attitudes of faculty toward academic dishonesty in general, and individual differences as predictors of academic dishonesty

the interdisciplinary nature of the topic and the ethical challenges of accessing and using information technology, especially in the age of the Internet. Writings have been reported in the literatures of education, psychology, and library and information studies, each looking at academic dishonesty from different perspectives. The literature has been aimed at instructors and scholars in education and developmental psychology, as well as college librarians and school media specialists.

Although the literature appears to be scattered across many fields, standard dictionaries and encyclopedias agree on the meaning of plagiarism.

According to Webster’s, plagiarism is equated with kidnapping and defined as “the unauthorized use of the language and thoughts of another author and the representation of them as one’s own.”(FN10) The Oxford English Dictionary defines plagiarism as the “wrongful appropriation or purloining, and publication as one’s own, of the ideas, or the expression of the ideas (literary, artistic, musical, mechanical, etc.).”(

plagiarism is an elusive concept and has been treated differently in different contexts.

different types of plagiarism: direct plagiarism; truncation (where strings are deleted in the beginning or ending); excision (strings are deleted from the middle of sentences); insertions; inversions; substitutions; change of tense, person, number, or voice; undocumented factual information; inappropriate use of quotation marks; or paraphrasing.

defined plagiarism as a deliberate use of “someone else’s language, ideas, or other original (not common-knowledge) material without acknowledging its source.”(FN30) This definition is extended to printed and digital materials, manuscripts, and other works. Plagiarism is interrelated to intellectual property, copyright, and authorship, and is discussed from the perspective of multiculturalism.(FN31)

Jeffrey Klausman made three distinctions among direct plagiarism, paraphrase plagiarism, and patchwork plagiarism

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Cosgrove, J., Norelli, B., & Putnam, E. (2005). Setting the Record Straight: How Online Database Providers Are Handling Plagiarism and Fabrication Issues. College & Research Libraries66(2), 136-148.

http://login.libproxy.stcloudstate.edu/login?qurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ebscohost.com%2flogin.aspx%3fdirect%3dtrue%26db%3dllf%26AN%3d502949739%26site%3dehost-live%26scope%3dsite

None of the database providers used links for corrections. Although it is true that the structure of a particular database (LexisNexis, for instance) may make static links more difficult to create than appending corrections, it is a shame that the most elemental characteristic of online resources–the ability to link–is so underutilized within the databases themselves.

Finding reliable materials using online databases is difficult enough for students, especially undergraduates, without having to navigate easily fixed pitfalls. The articles in this study are those most obviously in need of a correction or a link to a correction–articles identified by the publications themselves as being flawed by error, plagiarism, or fabrication. Academic librarians instruct students to carefully evaluate the literature in their campuses’ database resources. Unfortunately, it is not practical to expect undergraduate students to routinely search at the level necessary to uncover corrections and retractions nor do librarians commonly have the time to teach those skills.

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more on academic dishonesty, plagiarism in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=academic+dishonesty

news RSS

Why RSS Still Beats Facebook and Twitter for Tracking News

What is RSS?

For the completely uninitiated, RSS is just a standardized way of presenting text and images in a feed that can be used by a variety of apps and web services. It is just like how Twitter has a standard way of presenting text and images that all the various Twitter clients understand.

As we’ve already alluded to, when you follow the news via social media, you’re relying on other people bringing you the news, unless you’re following individual news stories. RSS is like getting your newspaper of choice delivered to the front door rather than relying on heading down to the local bar to listen in on what everyone’s shouting about.

With only one page to visit rather than dozens to catch up on, you can spend less time aimlessly drifting around and more time catching up on the posts that matter.

It’s not just for news

Basically anything you might want to keep track of and not miss because of the cacophony of voices on social media,

The always-useful IFTTT (If This Then That) is fluent in RSS, giving you even more ways to make use of RSS. You can build applets to generate tweets or Facebook posts or Instagram updates from a particular feed. Zapier is another service that can take RSS feeds from anywhere in the web and plug them into other apps and platforms.

Finding an RSS reader

Digg ReaderFeedlyPanda is a clean and relatively young news aggregator,

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more on RSS in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=rss

storytelling meets fake news

‘School For Good And Evil’ Is A Kids’ Fantasy Series For The Fake News Era

September 18, 20174:45 PM ET 
http://www.npr.org/2017/09/18/550797568/school-for-good-and-evil-is-a-kids-fantasy-series-for-the-fake-news-era

There’s a YouTube channel, an interactive website with t-shirt giveaways and character contests, Instagrams, dramatic book trailers. Universal Pictures bought the rights to the series pretty much as soon as the first book was published.

The power of a lie that feels true and drives people’s behavior is at the heart of the book — a theme that feels very now.

 

NMC digital literacy

NMC Releases Second Horizon Project Strategic Brief on Digital Literacy

NMC Releases Second Horizon Project Strategic Brief on Digital Literacy

The New Media Consortium (NMC) has released Digital Literacy in Higher Education, Part II: An NMC Horizon Project Strategic Brief, a follow-up to its 2016 strategic brief on digital literacy.

PDF available here.
2017-nmc-strategic-brief-digital-literacy-in-higher-education-II-ycykt3

But what does it really mean to be digitally literate, and which standards do we use?” said Dr. Eden Dahlstrom, NMC Executive Director. “This report sheds light on the meaning and impact of digital literacy using cross-cultural and multi-disciplinary approaches, highlighting frameworks and exemplars in practice.

NMC’s report has identified a need for institutions and thought leaders to consider the ways in which content creation is unequally expressed throughout the world. In an examination of digital literacy within European, Middle Eastern, and African nations (EMEA), research has surfaced unequal access to information technology based on inequalities of economics, gender, race, and political divides.

2020 2015
1. Complex Problem Solving 1. Complex Problem Solving
2. Critical Thinking 2. Coordinating with Others
3. Creativity 3. People  Management
4. People  Management 4. Critical Thinking
5. Coordinating with Others 5. Negotiation
6. Emotional  Intelligence 6. Quality Control
7. Judgment and Decision Making 7. Service  Orientation
8. Service  Orientation 8. Judgment and Decision Making
9. Negotiation 9. Active Listening
10. Cognitive  Flexibility 10. Creativity

Digital tools themselves are merely enablers, pushing the envelope of  what learners can create. No longer is it acceptable for students to be passive consumers of content; they can contribute to the local and global knowledge ecosystem, learning through the act of producing and discussing rich media, applications, and objects. In the words of many institutional mission statements, students do not have to wait until they graduate to change the world.

Using readily available  digital  content  creation tools (e.g., video production and editing, web and graphic tools), students are evolving into digital storytellers,

digital literacy now encompasses the important skills of being able to coordinate with others to create something truly original that neither mind would fathom independently.

The ability to discern credible from inaccurate resources is foundational to digital literacy. my note: #Fakenews

A lack of broad consensus on the meaning of digital literacy still hinders its uptake, although a growing  body  of research is helping higher education professionals better navigate the continuous adjustments to the field brought about by emerging pedagogies and technologies.

Information literacy is a nearly universal component within these digital literacy frameworks. Critically finding, assessing, and using digital content within the vast and sometimes chaotic internet appears as a vital skill in almost every account, including those published beyond libraries. In contrast, media literacy is less widely included in digital literacy publications,  possibly  due  to  a  focus  on  scholarly, rather than popular, materials. Digital literacies ultimately combine information and media literacy.

United States digital literacy frameworks tend to  focus  on  educational  policy details and personal empowerment,  the  latter  encouraging  learners  to  become  more  effective students, better creators, smarter information consumers, and more influential members of their community.

National policies are vitally important in European digital literacy work, unsurprising for a continent well populated with nation-states and struggling to redefine itself… this recommendation for Balkan digital strategy: “Media and information education (with an emphasis on critical thinking and switching from consumption to action) should start at early ages, but address all ages.”

African digital literacy is more business-oriented. Frameworks often speak to job skills and digital entrepreneurship. New skills and professions are emphasized, symbolized by the call for “new collar” positions.

Middle Eastern nations offer yet another variation, with a strong focus on media literacy. As with other regions, this can be a response to countries with strong state influence or control over local media. It can  also  represent  a  drive  to  produce  more  locally-sourced  content,  as  opposed  to  consuming

Digital literacy is a complex phenomenon in 2017, when considered internationally. Nations  and regions are creating ways to help their populations grapple with the digital revolution that are shaped by their local situations. In doing so, they cut across the genealogy of digital literacies, touching on its historical components: information literacy, digital skills, and media literacy.

2017-nmc-strategic-brief-digital-literacy-in-higher-education-II-ycykt3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

How Does Digital Literacy Change Pedagogy?

Students are not all digital natives, and do not necessarily have the same level of capabilities. Some need to be taught to use online tools (such as how to navigate a LMS) for learning. However, once digital literacy skills for staff and students are explicitly recognized as important for learning and teaching, critical drivers for pedagogical change are in place.

Pedagogy that uses an inquiry based/problem solving approach is a great framework to enhance the use and practice of digital skills/capabilities in the classroom.

The current gap between students’ information literacy skills and their need  to  internalize  digital literacy competencies creates an opportunity for academic librarians to support students  in  the pursuit of civic online reasoning at the core of NMC’s multimodal model of three digital literacies. Academic librarians need a new strategy that evolves information literacy to an expanded role educating digitally literate students. Let’s build a new model in which academic librarians are  entrepreneurial collaborators with faculty,55  supporting  their  classroom  efforts  to  help  students become responsible sharers and commentators of news on social media.

“Digital literacy is not just about ensuring that students can use the latest technologies, but also developing skills to select the right tools for a particular context to deepen their learning outcomes and engage in creative problem-solving”

There is a disconnect between how students experience and interact with technology in their personal lives and how they use technology in their roles as  students.  Yes, students are digitally savvy, and yes,  universities  have  a  role  in  questioning  (insightfully  of  course) their sometimes brash digital savviness. We have a situation where students are expecting more, but (as I see it) cannot provide a clear demand, while faculty are unable to walk in  the  shoes  of  the students.

 

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more on digital literacy in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=digital+literacy

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