Online Game-based Learning in Art History and Museum Contexts

The Games Art Historians Play: Online Game-based Learning in Art History and Museum Contexts

game-based learning differs from gamification in several important ways. Sometimes the latter is reduced to bells and whistles such as gold stars and progress bars, but gamification is potentially a much more subtle and powerful teaching strategy.

lizabeth Goins (Rochester Institute of Technology) describes several recent projects including a 3D game based on Hieronymous Bosch’s Garden of Earthly Delights in her blog, and details as well assignments in which the students create games. Keri Watson (University of Central Florida), teaches with both a RPG (role-playing game) and an ARG (alternative reality game). The RPG is Gretchen Kreahling McKay’s “Modernism versus Traditionalism: Art in Paris, 1888-89,” a Reacting to the Past (see earlier PH coverage) game, targeted for use in first year seminars at small liberal arts colleges. She taught with the game several times while at Ithaca College and reflects on her experience here. Watson’s ARG, “Secret Societies of the Avant-garde,” was createdwith a colleague in digital media as a Unity-based game, and is still in development. (Anastasia Salter wrote about this game in February.) Their prototype was deployed this past spring in an upper level modern art course, the game poses for the students a series of the challenges to research and create online exhibitions. (Those interested in developing an ARG might also want to peruse this interesting recent piece from TechCrunch on historical accuracy in games.)

digital citizenship bibliography

From MyFunCity to government-structured approach to “digital citizenship,” this is recent trend, which is seriously considered by educators as a must in the curricula. While habitually connected with technology classes, it is a much larger issue, which requires faculty attention across disciplines; it encompass digital and technology literacy, netiquette and online behavior (cyberbulling most frequently addressed), as well qualities and skills to be a functional and mindful citizen of a global world.

here is some general literature on digital citizenship:

Robb, M., & Shellenbarger, T. (2013). Promoting Digital Citizenship and Academic Integrity in Technology Classrooms. Teaching Professor, 27(8), 1-4.
Digital Citizenship: The Internet, Society, and Participation

Digital Citizenship: Addressing Appropriate Technology Behavior
Ribble, Mike S.; Bailey, Gerald D.; Ross, Tweed W.
Learning & Leading with Technology, v32 n1 p6-9, 11 Sep 2004

Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology

Volume 9, Issue 1, Fall 2005. Education and Citizenship in the Digital Age

Isman, A., & Canan Gungoren, O. (2014). Digital Citizenship. Turkish Online Journal Of Educational Technology – TOJET, 13(1), 73-77.

PR, N. (2014, April 3). MyFunCity is a revolution in digital citizenship. PR Newswire US.

Communication Studies:

Couldry, N., Stephansen, H., Fotopoulou, A., MacDonald, R., Clark, W., & Dickens, L. (2014). Digital citizenship? Narrative exchange and the changing terms of civic culture. Citizenship Studies, 18(6/7), 615-629. doi:10.1080/13621025.2013.865903 (please ask for copy of the article)

Simsek, E., & Simsek, A. (2013). New Literacies for Digital Citizenship. Online Submission,  Contemporary Educational Technology, 4(3), 126-137.

Wineburg, S., & Reisman, A. (2015). Disciplinary Literacy in History: A Toolkit for Digital Citizenship. Journal Of Adolescent & Adult Literacy, 58(8), 636-639. (please ask for copy of the article)


Human Relations and Multicultural Education (HURL):

Baumann, P., & Education Commission of the, S. (2012). Civic Engagement through Digital Citizenship: Engaging Youth in Active, Participatory Citizenship through Digital Media. The Progress of Education Reform. Volume 13, Number 1. Education Commission Of The States,
Shelat, M. (2015). Global civic engagement on online platforms: Women as transcultural citizens. Dissertation Abstracts International Section A, 75,
Kurubacak, G. (2011). eLearning for Pluralism: The Culture of eLearning in Building a Knowledge Society. Online Submission,

Child and Family Studies (CFS)

Lenhart, A., Madden, M., Smith, A., Purcell, K., Zickuhr, K., Rainie, L., & Pew Internet & American Life, P. (2011). Teens, Kindness and Cruelty on Social Network Sites: How American Teens Navigate the New World of “Digital Citizenship”. Pew Internet & American Life Project,

ORTH, D., & CHEN, E. (2013). The Strategy FOR DIGITAL CITIZENSHIP. Independent School, 72(4), 56-63.

Ives, E. A. (2012, October 1). iGeneration: The Social Cognitive Effects of Digital Technology on Teenagers. Online Submission,

Monterosa, V. (2015). DEVELOPING DIGITAL CITIZENS. Leadership, 44(3), 30-32.

10 Free Interactive Lessons about Digital Citizenship. (2012). Curriculum Review, 52(1), 4-5.

Graham, G. (2013, November 20). Pupils are now ‘digital citizens’ with the right to use a mobile. Daily Mail. p. 3.

LifeLock, I. (0009, January). Free Online Tool Empowers Families to Set Technology Ground Rules as More Kids Go Digital. Business Wire (English).


Teacher Development (ED/TDEV)

Dettori, G. (2012). Digital citizenship in schools – By Ribble Mike. British Journal Of Educational Technology, 43(6), E179. doi:10.1111/j.1467-8535.2012.01378_9.x

Ribble, M. (2012). Digital Citizenship for Educational Change. Kappa Delta Pi Record, 48(4), 148-151.

(please ask for copy of the article)

Johnson, M. (2012). Shaping Digital Citizens: preparing students to work and play in the online world. School Libraries In Canada (17108535), 30(3), 19-22.

Enabling digital citizenship programs within your district’s network infrastructure. (2012). District Administration, 48(9), 54-55.

ORECH, J. (2012). HOW IT’S DONE: Incorporating Digital Citizenship Into Your Everyday Curriculum. Tech & Learning, 33(1), 16-18.

Petrucco, C. (2013). Fostering digital literacy between schools and the local community: Using service learning and project-based learning as a conceptual framework. International Journal Of Digital Literacy And Digital Competence, 4(3), 10-18. doi:10.4018/ijdldc.2013070102


Educational Leadership and Higher Education (ELHE)

Acosta, D. M. (2014). Tweet Up? Examining Twitter’s Impact on Social Capital and?Digital Citizenship in Higher Education. About Campus, 18(6), 10-17.

Suppo, C. A. (2013, January 1). Digital Citizenship Instruction in Pennsylvania Public Schools: School Leaders Expressed Beliefs and Current Practices. ProQuest LLC, (please ask for copy of the article)

Noonoo, S. (2014). Digital Citizenship for the Real World. T H E Journal, 41(4), 17-19.

Ribble, M. (2014). The importance of digital citizenship. District Administration, 50(11), 88.

MURLEY, S. F. (2014). Engaging With a Digital Citizenry. School Administrator, 71(10), 30-31

Ahlquist, J. (2014). Trending Now: Digital Leadership Education Using Social Media and the Social Change Model. Journal Of Leadership Studies, 8(2), 57-60. doi:10.1002/jls.21332

Neustar, I. (0001, September). Neustar Launches Social Media Digital Citizenship Program for  Kentucky Schools. Business Wire (English).


Special Education (SPED)

Farmer, L. (2012). Digital Citizenship for Youth with Autism Spectrum Disorders. CSLA Journal, 35(2), 12-13.

Common Sense Media. (2011). Common Sense Media Partners with Nickelodeon’s the Big Help on Digital Citizenship and Anti-Bullying Campaign. Business Wire (English).



Lyons, R. (2012, January 1). Investigating Student Gender and Grade Level Differences in Digital Citizenship Behavior. ProQuest LLC, (please ask for copy of the article)

NOONAN, K. (2013). DIGITAL CITIZENS RISE TO DISASTERS. Government News, 33(1), 16.

Buente, W. (2012). Modeling citizenship offline and online: Internet use, information, and political action during the 2008 election campaign. Dissertation Abstracts International Section A, 73, 1222.

Kurubacak, G. (2011). eLearning for Pluralism: The Culture of eLearning in Building a Knowledge Society. International Journal On E-Learning, 10(2), 145-167.

Hill, A. M. (2015). The kids are all right online: Teen girls’ experiences with self-presentation, impression management & aggression on Facebook. Dissertation Abstracts International Section A, 76,


Criminal Justice

NPR. (2015, April 13). National Cyber Security Alliance Aligns with RSA Conference to Empower Digital Citizens to Stay Current in the Ever-changing Cybersecurity Environment. PR Newswire US.

NPR. (2014, February 11). Digital Citizens Alliance Calls Prosecution of Apps Content Thieves Important Step to Protect Internet. PR Newswire US.


NPR. (2015, May 18). Public Officials, Business Leaders and Cybersecurity Experts Gather at “Two Steps Ahead: Protect Your Digital Life” Event in Brooklyn. PR Newswire US.


Political Science

NOONAN, K. (2013). DIGITAL CITIZENS RISE TO DISASTERS. Government News, 33(1), 16.

Buente, W. (2012). Modeling citizenship offline and online: Internet use, information, and political action during the 2008 election campaign. Dissertation Abstracts International Section A, 73, 1222.

Kurubacak, G. (2011). eLearning for Pluralism: The Culture of eLearning in Building a Knowledge Society. International Journal On E-Learning, 10(2), 145-167.

Education Commission of the State. (2012, September). Education Commission of the States Releases Brief on Civic Engagement and Digital Citizenship. Business Wire (English).

NPR. (2015, May 18). Public Officials, Business Leaders and Cybersecurity Experts Gather at “Two Steps Ahead: Protect Your Digital Life” Event in Brooklyn. PR Newswire US.



Lofton, J. (2015). Blogging with Students: A Vehicle for Writing, Digital Citizenship, and More. School Librarian’s Workshop, 35(5), 13-15.
Oxley, C. (2011). Digital citizenship: developing an ethical and responsible online culture. Access (10300155), 25(3), 5-9.


SOCIO-INT15- 2nd INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON EDUCATION SOCIAL SCIENCES AND HUMANITIES will be held in Istanbul (Turkey), on the 8th, 9th and 10th of June 2015 is an interdisciplinary international conference that invites academics, independent scholars and researchers from around the world to meet and exchange the latest ideas and discuss issues concerning all fields of Education, Social Sciences and Humanities.


SOCIO-INT15 provides the ideal opportunity to bring together professors, researchers and high education students of different disciplines, discuss new issues, and discover the most recent developments, new trends and researches in education, social sciences and humanities.

Academics making efforts in education, subfields of which might include higher education, early childhood education, adult education, special education, e-learning, language education, etc. are highly welcomed. People without papers can also participate in this conference as audience so long as they find it interesting and meaningful.

Due to the nature of the conference with its focus on innovative ideas and developments, papers also related to all areas of social sciences including communication, accounting, finance, economics, management, business, marketing, education, sociology, psychology, political science, law and other areas of social sciences; also all areas of humanities including anthropology, archaelogy, architecture, art, ethics, folklore studies, history, language studies, literature, methodological studies, music, philosophy, poetry and theater are invited for the international conference.

Submitted papers will be subject to peer review and evaluated based on originality and clarity of exposition.

Minecraft: Games and Gamification

The Minecraft Experience Panel Presentation Games for Change NYC April 24th 2014

Extended Description:

Last year at G4C Nick Fortugno threw some controversy into the conversation about Minecraft by suggesting Minecraft was not a game but a toy. The proposed panel extends that conversation by asking what is the Minecraft experience, can it be defined or categorised and what as game designers and exponents can we take from understanding its zeitgeist and the impact it has had on the serious gaming landscape?

In 2012/23 at both GLS and G4C many presenters made jokes about including the obligatory Minecraft slide and for very good reasons. Minecraft is arguably a game of immense impact. It has been embraced as part of learning programs focussing on seemingly disparate areas from digital citizenship, history, coding and the maker movement. It is probably the first game brought into the classroom by teachers to leverage the out of school groundswell of existing player excitement. It’s impact is multi generational and perhaps more global than any game before it. The fan base and user community/ies are strong and well supported and exemplar of the potential Jim Gee describes for Big G game. This panel proposes to leverage that Big G space in the lead up to Games for Change 2014 and to honor the voices of its players.

Minecraft has been variously described as a game, toy sandpit, learning space, creative environment, virtual world, and game-infused service. But what really are the affordances of this blocky 16 bit program and how can we even begin to define its value to learning? Enter the Minecraft Experience, a global crowdsourced program managed by Bron Stuckey of The Massively Minecraft Project. People engaging in Minecraft activities about the globe are being invited to describe Minecraft in all its contexts and adaptations. The categories for these experiences will emerge from the crowd sourced content as members contribute thoughts, media, resources and questions to build the __Minecraft Experience__ evidence base.

This panel of notable speakers has been drawn together to answer provocative questions about Minecraft’s success and define its relationship to and impact on learning. The panelists have been chosen to represent play in many contexts formal education, informal learning, self-organised learning, schools and non-school contexts. They include game designers, educators, researchers, learners and parents who have each had a personal and professional experience of this and many other games.

Panelists take a position on the Minecraft experience and use the resources provided by members of the project to inform, support and evidence their case.

How are players, educators and researchers invited to contribute?

  • project wiki to prod, poke, stimulate and support crowd sourced content and dialog
  • live youth speakers on the panel
  • social media and wiki activity in lead-up using selected #minecraftproject
  • video inclusions of educators, parents, kids/youth arguments, evidence and questions
  • promotion of youth media pieces from existing YouTube etc to support and stimulate various provocative dialogs
  • livestream of the panel to global contributors with live feedback and questions.

Who could benefit from joining this project and attending the G4C 2014 panel session?

  • Educators seeking to understand Minecraft’s value to learning
  • Programs seeking to adapt Minecraft as part of a program of impact or change.
  • Game designers seeking to build in its wake
  • Anyone wanting to consider issues of fidelity, adaptation, constructionism, popular culture, and impact in gaming.