Posts Tagged ‘leader’

Incompetent Leader

The Most Common Type of Incompetent Leader

Scott Gregory  MARCH 30, 2018

https://hbr.org/2018/03/the-most-common-type-of-incompetent-leader

Researchers have studied managerial derailment — or the dark side of leadership — for many years. The key derailment characteristics of bad managers are well documented and fall into three broad behavioral categories: (1) “moving away behaviors,” which create distance from others through hyper-emotionality, diminished communication, and skepticism that erodes trust; (2) “moving against behaviors,” which overpower and manipulate people while aggrandizing the self; and (3) “moving toward behaviors,” which include being ingratiating, overly conforming, and reluctant to take chances or stand up for one’s team. The popular media is full of examples of bad leaders in government, academia, and business with these characteristics.

Absentee leadership rarely comes up in today’s leadership or business literature, but research shows that it is the most common form of incompetent leadership.

Absentee leaders are people in leadership roles who are psychologically absent from them. They were promoted into management, and enjoy the privileges and rewards of a leadership role, but avoid meaningful involvement with their teams. Absentee leadership resembles the concept of rent-seeking in economics — taking value out of an organization without putting value in. As such, they represent a special case of laissez-faire leadership, but one that is distinguished by its destructiveness.

Having a boss who lets you do as you please may sound ideal, especially if you are being bullied and micromanaged by your current boss. However, a 2015 survey of 1,000 working adults showed that eight of the top nine complaints about leaders concerned behaviors that were absent; employees were most concerned about what their bosses didn’t do.

Research shows that being ignored by one’s boss is more alienating than being treated poorly. The impact of absentee leadership on job satisfaction outlasts the impact of both constructive and overtly destructive forms of leadership. Constructive leadership immediately improves job satisfaction, but the effects dwindle quickly. Destructive leadership immediately degrades job satisfaction, but the effects dissipate after about six months. In contrast, the impact of absentee leadership takes longer to appear, but it degrades subordinates’ job satisfaction for at least two years. It also is related to a number of other negative outcomes for employees, like role ambiguityhealth complaints, and increased bullying from team members. Absentee leadership creates employee stress, which can lead to poor employee health outcomes and talent drain, which then impact an organization’s bottom line.

Because absentee leaders don’t actively make trouble, their negative impact on organizations can be difficult to detect, and when it is detected, it often is considered a low-priority problem. Thus, absentee leaders are often silent organization killers. Left unchecked, absentee leaders clog an organization’s succession arteries, blocking potentially more effective people from moving into important roles while adding little to productivity. Absentee leaders rarely engage in unforgivable bouts of bad behavior, and are rarely the subject of ethics investigations resulting from employee hotline calls. As a result, their negative effect on organizations accumulates over time, largely unchecked.

Constructive leadership creates high engagement and productivity, while destructive leadership kills engagement and productivity. 

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more on what makes “great leader” in this IMS blog

leader charts

leader charts

What makes a great leader, explained in eight counterintuitive charts

Shane Snow June 5, 2018

https://work.qz.com/1297375/what-makes-a-great-leader-explained-in-eight-counterintuitive-charts/

Flexible Visionaries

Opinionated Adapters

Ego-Free Fighters

Intellectually Humble

Different And United

Supportive Adversaries

Angelic Troublemakers

Skeptical Optimists

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leaders influence people and performance

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more on ed leader in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=ed+leader

more on incompetent leader (absentee leader) in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2018/07/14/incompetent-leader/

five signs weak manager

Five Signs You Work For A Weak Manager

being a strong manager doesn’t mean being forceful or domineering
strong managers are strong enough to lead through trust, whereas weak managers have to use the force of their job titles to make people listen to them.
Can’t Ask for Help
Needs a Handy Scapegoat
Can’t Say “I Don’t Know”
Measures Everything
Can’t Say “I’m Sorry”

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more on educational leadership in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=educational+leadership