Posts Tagged ‘Library Instruction’

standard library instruction

Library Instruction delivered by Plamen Miltenoff, pmiltenoff@stcloudstate.edu

Dr. Kannan Sivaprakasam,
CHEM 151. Feb 10, 8-8:50PM.
Link to this tutorial in PDF format: library instruction tutorial

Short link to this tutorial: http://bit.ly/chem151

QR code

  1. Badges for library instruction

Link to the video tutorial regarding microcredentials (badges)

My name is Plamen Miltenoff (https://web.stcloudstate.edu/pmiltenoff/faculty/)  and I am the InforMedia Specialist with the SCSU Library (https://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/free-tech-instruction/).

Dr. Sivaprakasam and I are developing a microcredentialing system for your class.

The “library” part has several components:

  • One badge for your ability to use the databases and find reliable scientific information in your field (required)
    submit your results in the respective D2L assignment folder. A badge will be issued to you after the assignment is graded
  • One badge for completing the quiz based on the information from this library instruction (required)
    a badge will be issued to you automatically after successful completion of the quizz
  • One badge for your ability to use social media for a serious, reliable, scientific research (required)
    submit your results in the respective D2L assignment folder. A badge will be issued to you after the assignment is graded
  • One badge for using the D2L “embedded librarian” widget to contact the librarian with questions regarding your class research (one of two optional)
    A badge will be issued to you after your post with your email or any other contact information is submitted
  • One badge for helping class peer with his research (one of two optional)
    submit your results in the respective D2L assignment folder. A badge will be issued to you after the assignment is graded

Collecting two of the required and one of the optional badges let you earn the superbadge “Mastery of Library Instruction.”

The superbadge brings points toward your final grade.

Master of Library Instruction badge

 

how to collect badges

 

 

 

 

Once you acquire the badges, Dr. Sivaprakasam will reflect your achievement in D2L Grades.

If you are building a LinkedIn portfolio, here are directions to upload your badges in your LinkedIn account using Badgr:

https://community.brightspace.com/s/article/Sharing-Badges-in-Brightspace

chem 151 Social Media accounts

Please do remember we are still developing the system and we will appreciate your questions and feedback; do not hesitate to contact us, if any…

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LIBRARY INSTRUCTION – Information, Digital and Media Literacy

  1. How (where from) do you receive your news? Do you think you are able to distinguish real news from fake news?
    1. Last year, researchers at Oxford Universityfound that 70 countries had political disinformation campaigns over two years.
      https://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2020/01/20/bots-and-disinformation/
    2. according to Pew Research Center, 68 percent of American adults get their news from social media—platforms where opinion is often presented as fact.
      results of the international test revealed that only 14 percent of U.S. students were able to reliably distinguish between fact and opinion.

https://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2020/01/16/fake-news-prevention/

News and Media Literacy (and the lack of) is not very different from Information Literacy

An “information literate” student is able to “locate, evaluate, and effectively use information from diverse sources.” See more About Information Literacy.

How does information literacy help me?

Every day we have questions that need answers. Where do we go? Whom can we trust? How can we find information to help ourselves? How can we help our family and friends? How can we learn about the world and be a better citizen? How can we make our voice heard?

The content of the tutorial is based on the Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education as approved by the Board of Directors of the Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL).

The standards are:

Standard 1. The information literate student determines the nature and extent of the
information needed

Standard 2. The information literate student accesses needed information effectively
and efficiently

Standard 3. The information literate student evaluates information and its sources
critically and incorporates selected information into his or her knowledge
base and value system

Standard 4. The information literate student, individually or as a member of a group,
uses information effectively to accomplish a specific purpose

Standard 5. The information literate student understands many of the economic, legal,
and social issues surrounding the use of information and accesses and uses
information ethically and legally

Project Information Literacy
A national, longitudinal research study based in the University of Washington’s iSchool, compiling data on how college students seek and use information.

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  1. Developing Your Research Topic/Question

Research always starts with a question.  But the success of your research also depends on how you formulate that question.  If your topic is too broad or too narrow, you may have trouble finding information when you search. When developing your question/topic, consider the following:

  • Is my question one that is likely to have been researched and for which data have been published?  Believe it or not, not every topic has been researched and/or published in the literature.
  • Be flexible.  Consider broadening or narrowing the topic if you are getting a limited number or an overwhelming number of results when you search. In nursing it can be helpful to narrow by thinking about a specific population (gender, age, disease or condition, etc.), intervention, or outcome.
  • Discuss your topic with your professor and be willing to alter your topic according to the guidance you receive.

  1. Getting Ready for Research
    Library Resources vs. the Internet
    How (where from) do you receive information about your professional interests?
    Advantages/disadvantages of using Web Resources

chem 151 databases

Evaluating Web Resources

  1. Google or similar; Yahoo, Bing
  2. Google Scholar
  3. Reddit, Digg, Quora
  4. Wikipedia
  5. Become a member of professional organizations and use their online information
  6. Use the SCSU library page to online databases
  1. Building Your List of Keywords
    1. Why Keyword Searching?
      Why not just type in a phrase or sentence like you do in Google or Yahoo!?

      1. Because most electronic databases store and retrieve information differently than Internet search engines.
      2. A databases searches fields within a collection of records. These fields include the information commonly found in a citation plus an abstract (if available) and subject headings.  Search engines search web content which is typically the full text of sources.
    1. The bottom line: you get better results in a database by using effective keyword search strategies.
    2. To develop an effective search strategy, you need to:
      1. determine the key concepts in your topic and
      2. develop a good list of keyword synonyms.
    1. Why use synonyms?
      Because there is more than one way to express a concept or idea.  You don’t know if the article you’re looking for uses the same expression for a key concept that you are using.
    2. Consider: Will an author use:
      1. Hypertension or High Blood Pressure?
      2. Teach or Instruct?
      3. Therapy or Treatment?

Don’t get “keyword lock!”  Be willing to try a different term as a keyword. If you are having trouble thinking of synonyms, check a thesaurus, dictionary, or reference book for ideas.

Keyword worksheet

  1. Library Resources

chem 151 results libsearch
How to find the SCSU Library Website
SCSU online databases

    1. SCSU Library Web page

lib web page

  1. Basic Research Skills

Locating and Defining a Database
Database Searching Overview:
You can search using the SCSU library online dbases by choosing:
Simple search
Advanced search

Simple vs Advanced Search

  1. Identifying a Scholarly Source

scholarly sources

  1. Boolean operators

  1. Databases:
    CINAHL, MEDLINE, PubMed, Health Source: Consumer Edition, Health Source: Nursing/Academic Edition

Psychology:
PsychINFO

General Science
ScienceDirect
Arts & Humanities Citation Index

  1. How do you evaluate a source of information to determine if it is appropriate for academic/scholarly use.  There is no set “checklist” to complete but below are some criteria to consider when you are evaluating a source.
    1. ACCURACY
      1. Does the author cite reliable sources?
      2. How does the information compare with that in other works on the topic?
      3. Can you determine if the information has gone through peer-review?
      4. Are there factual, spelling, typographical, or grammatical errors?
    2.  AUDIENCE
      1. Who do you think the authors are trying to reach?
      2. Is the language, vocabulary, style and tone appropriate for intended audience?
      3. What are the audience demographics? (age, educational level, etc.)
      4. Are the authors targeting a particular group or segment of society?
    3.  AUTHORITY
      1. Who wrote the information found in the article or on the site?
      2. What are the author’s credentials/qualifications for this particular topic?
      3. Is the author affiliated with a particular organization or institution?
      4. What does that affiliation suggest about the author?
    1. CURRENCY
      1. Is the content current?
      2. Does the date of the information directly affect the accuracy or usefulness of the information?
    1. OBJECTIVITY/BIAS
      1. What is the author’s or website’s point of view?
      2. Is the point of view subtle or explicit?
      3. Is the information presented as fact or opinion?
      4. If opinion, is the opinion supported by credible data or informed argument?
      5. Is the information one-sided?
      6. Are alternate views represented?
      7. Does the point of view affect how you view the information?
    1. PURPOSE
      1. What is the author’s purpose or objective, to explain, provide new information or news, entertain, persuade or sell?
      2. Does the purpose affect how you view the information presented?
  1. InterLibrary Loan

  1. Copyright and Fair Use
    Author Rights and Publishing & Finding Author Instructions for Publishing in Scholarly Journals

    1. Plagiarism, academic honesty
  2. Writing Tips
  3. Dissemination of Research

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Plamen Miltenoff, Ph.D., MLIS
Professor
320-308-3072
pmiltenoff@stcloudstate.edu
http://web.stcloudstate.edu/pmiltenoff/faculty/
schedule a meeting: https://doodle.com/digitalliteracy
find my office: https://youtu.be/QAng6b_FJqs

 

SPED library instruction

Library instruction Information Literacy Digital Literacy

Instructor, Michael Pickle.  September 26, 4-5:30PM for SPED 204

short link to this blog entry: http://bit.ly/scsusped204

My name is Plamen Miltenoff and I will be leading your digital literacy instruction today: Here is more about me: http://web.stcloudstate.edu/pmiltenoff/faculty/ and more about the issues we will be discussing today: https://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/
As well as my email address for further contacts: pmiltenoff@stcloudstate.edu

  1. How do we search?
    1. Google and Google Scholar (more focused, peer reviewed, academic content)
    2. Digg http://digg.com/, Reddit https://www.reddit.com/ , Quora https://www.quora.com/
    3. SCSU Library search, Google, Professional organization, (e.g. NASET), Stacks of magazines, SCSU library info, but need to know what all of the options mean on that page
    4. https://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2018/04/02/publish-metrics-ranking-and-citation-info/
  2. Custom Search Engine:
    https://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2017/11/17/google-custom-search-engine/
  3. Basic electronic (library) search information and strategies. Library research services

https://www.semanticscholar.org/

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  • Searching SCSU library

https://www.stcloudstate.edu/library/

library research guide

here is the link to SPED:
https://stcloud.lib.minnstate.edu/subjects/guide.php?subject=SPED

50 min : http://web.stcloudstate.edu/pmiltenoff/bi/ 

5 min to introduce and make a connection

Plan 1. Introduction to the library (for library novices: Virtual Reality library orientation and gamified library instruction ) 

15 min for a Virtual Reality tours of the Library + quiz on how well they learned the library:
http://bit.ly/VRlib

and 360 degree video on BYOD:

Play a scavenger hunt IN THE LIBRARY: http://bit.ly/learnlib

history Becker

Digital Literacy and History

Plamen Miltenoff – http://web.stcloudstate.edu/pmiltenoff/faculty/
with Heather Abrahamson, Becker High School Social Studies, 763-261-4501 (Ext. 3507)
9:50-11:15; 11:20-11:45;  12:20-1:20 |
link to this blog entry: https://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2017/05/01/history-becker/
short link – http://bit.ly/histbecker

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list of web sites with images for the students’ projects:

  • Holocaust

https://www.ushmm.org/collections/the-museums-collections/about/photo-archives

http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/holocaust-photographs

https://go.fold3.com/holocaust_records/

https://www.wienerlibrary.co.uk/Photographs

https://www.thoughtco.com/large-collection-of-holocaust-pictures-1779703

http://www.yadvashem.org/yv/en/holocaust/resource_center/item.asp?gate=4-2

http://www.history.com/topics/world-war-ii/the-holocaust/pictures/holocaust-concentration-camps/poland-auschwitz-birkenau-death-camp

  • Cold War

http://www.gettyimages.com/photos/cold-war

http://www.coldwar.org/museum/photo_gallery.asp

http://www.cnn.com/2014/03/04/world/gallery/cold-war-history/

http://time.com/3879870/berlin-wall-photos-early-days-cold-war-symbol/

http://digitalarchive.wilsoncenter.org/theme/cold-war-history

http://archive.millercenter.org/academic/dgs/primaryresources/cold_war

  • others

http://www.loc.gov/pictures/

http://www.gettyimages.com/editorialimages/archival

https://www.archives.gov/research/alic/reference/photography.html

 

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Defining my interests. Narrowing a topic. How do I collect information? How do I search for information?

How do we search for “serious” information?

https://www.google.com/; https://scholar.google.com/ (3 min); http://academic.research.microsoft.com/http://www.dialog.com/http://www.quetzal-search.infohttp://www.arXiv.orghttp://www.journalogy.com/ 
  • Digg, Reddit , Quora, Medium,
http://digg.com/, https://www.reddit.com/, https://www.quora.com/ StackExchange http://stackexchange.com/Kngine.com; AskScience https://www.reddit.com/r/askscience/, ,  and similar, https://medium.com/ (5 min)
YouTube, SlideShare https://www.slideshare.net/  and similar https://www.slideshare.net/search/slideshow?searchfrom=header&q=modern+history
  • Professional organization and social media
(10 min)
Wikipedia https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Modern_history
blogs, listservs http://www.bestcollegesonline.com/blog/100-awesome-blogs-for-history-junkies/
Facebook  history
Twitter  twitter
LinkedIn Groups https://www.linkedin.com/groups/my-groups  
team work using your social media accounts (e.g. Facebook, Twitter), search for information related to your topic of interest (5 min)

  • Other search engines
https://www.semanticscholar.org/
  • University Library Search
(20 min)
every university library has subject guides for different disciplines. here are the ones from SCSU http://stcloud.lib.mnscu.edu/subjects/guide.php?subject=HIST-WOR Kahoot game (5 min)
basic electronic (library) search information and strategies. Library research services (5 min)

using the library database, do a search on a topic of your interest.

compare the returns on your search. make an attempt to refine the search.

retrieve the following information about the book of interest: is it relevant to your topic (check the subjects); is it timely (check the published date); is it available

 books
Strategies for conducting advanced searches (setting up filters and search criteria)
Articles and databases (10 min)  
Kahoot competition use your smart phones to find the best researcher among you
https://play.kahoot.it/#/k/c376c27a-d39a-4825-8541-1c1ae728e1bc
https://play.kahoot.it/#/k/5e6d126f-be4d-47d0-9b6e-dfc3f2c90e61
https://play.kahoot.it/#/k/89706729-3663-4ec3-a351-173bf1bf4ed7history:
https://play.kahoot.it/#/k/7510e6d8-170f-4c0c-b7bd-6d7dd60c3f6e
Reference and Facts
Streaming and Video http://www.stcloudstate.edu/library/research/video.aspx
Journal Title and Citation Finder
shall more info be needed and or “proper” session with a reference librarian be requested http://stcloud.lib.mnscu.edu/subjects/guide.php?subject=EDAD-D
Institutional Repository http://repository.stcloudstate.edu/
  • additional academic resources
Academic.com and ResearchGate

academia


  • VR tour SCSU library
http://bit.ly/360lib and http://bit.ly/360lib2;  http://bit.ly/VRlib (15 min)

  • bibliographic tools
Refworks https://www.refworks.com/refworks2/default.aspx?r=authentication::init&
Zotero, Mendeley, Endnote
Fast and easy bibliographic tools: https://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2013/12/06/bibliographic-tools-fast-and-easy/
 Primary and secondary sources video

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more on history in this IMS blog
https://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=history

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ALA resources for social media in libraries

Social media basics: Engaging your library users

http://www.ala.org/news/press-releases/2014/10/social-media-basics-engaging-your-library-users

Managing Traditional & Social Media for Libraries

http://www.ala.org/pla/onlinelearning/webinars/archive/media

Use of Social Media in the Library

http://www.ala.org/alcts/confevents/upcoming/webinar/121014

Social media has the potential to facilitate much closer relationships between libraries and their patrons. Current usage of social media by the library community generally remains ad hoc and somewhat experimental, but the uptake of these tools is accelerating, and they will likely play an increasingly important role in library service provision and outreach in the future. Taylor & Francis has produced a white paper that analyzes current practices relating social media’s use in the library and how this differs by librarian job role. The sample was taken from academic librarians around the world, which also allows us to examine differences by geographic location. The goal: to establish how librarians are currently using social media in their roles, the most useful social media tools and best applications for these tools in a library setting.

bit.ly/LibrarySM
http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/access/white-paper-social-media.pdf
http://downloads.alcts.ala.org/ce/141012socialmedialibrary_Slides.pdf

Academic Libraries

http://www.ala.org/news/state-americas-libraries-report-2014/academic-libraries

Learn to plan and strategize for ‘A More Effective Social Media Presence’ in new workshop

http://www.ala.org/news/press-releases/2012/08/learn-plan-and-strategize-more-effective-social-media-presence-new-workshop

Using social media to find collaboration, coordination and focus

http://www.ala.org/news/press-releases/2012/11/using-social-media-find-collaboration-coordination-and-focus promotes http://store.elsevier.com/Managing-Social-Media-in-Libraries/Troy-Swanson/isbn-9781780633770/

Rethinking social media to organize information and communities, popular eCourse returns!

http://www.ala.org/news/member-news/2016/02/rethinking-social-media-organize-information-and-communities-popular-ecourse

explores a variety of social media tools in terms of how they can be used to organize information and communities. Together, you will survey and use a variety of social media tools, such as Delicious, Diigo, Facebook, Goodreads, Google Hangouts, LibraryThing, Pinterest, Storify, Twitter, and more! You will also explore how social media tools can be used to organize and disseminate information and how they can be used to foster and sustain communities of learning.

Web_Analytics_Part1–Turning_Numbers_Into_Action–1-20-2011 from Paul Signorelli

In age of Social Media U.S. libraries encourage users to choose privacy

http://www.ala.org/news/news/pressreleases2010/april2010/privacy_pio

User-Generated Content in Library Discovery Systems

http://www.ala.org/advocacy/user-generated-content-library-discovery-systems

With the widespread use of library technology that incorporates social media components, intelligent objects, and knowledge-sharing tools comes the ability of libraries to provide greater opportunities for patron engagement in those discovery systems through user-generated content.  These features may include the ability of users to contribute commentary such as reviews, simple point-and-click rating systems (e.g. one star to five stars), or to engage in extensive discussions or other social interactions. This kind of content could transform authoritative files, alter information architecture, and change the flow of information within the library discovery system.

Privacy Shifting

http://www.ala.org/transforminglibraries/future/trends/privacy

Across generations, concerns for privacy may dissipate with time as specific technologies take hold or as people become aware of a technology’s benefits and value those over their value for privacy.

Library Privacy Guidelines for Students in K-12 Schools

http://www.ala.org/advocacy/library-privacy-guidelines-students-k-12-schools

my note: excellent blueprint for similar activities / policies at higher ed.

transcription tool

it is a hot topic [and contested] topic at MnSCU, considering ADA. In the MnSCU case, it is video and audio material, here, it is text based. The crowdsourcing idea applies, though…

From: lita-l-request@lists.ala.org <lita-l-request@lists.ala.org> on behalf of Ronald Houk <rhouk@ottumwapubliclibrary.org>
Sent: Thursday, September 10, 2015 10:01 AM
To: lita-l@lists.ala.org
Subject: Re: [lita-l] Crowdsourced transcription tool?

 

Hi Kathryn,

Scripto looks like an interesting project.  http://scripto.org/

 

On Thu, Sep 10, 2015 at 8:31 AM, Kathryn Frederick (Library) <kfrederi@skidmore.edu> wrote:

Hi,

We recently had preservation work done on a number of 16th – 18th century land patents. We will be digitizing them, and would like to transcribe the documents which are hand-written in English and, in some cases, Latin.

Is anyone aware of a tool that would allow us to crowdsource the transcription?

Thanks for any suggestions,

Kathryn

 

Kathryn Frederick

Head of Digital and Collection Services

Lucy Scribner Library – Skidmore College

Saratoga Springs, NY 12866

(518) 580-5505
To maximize your use of LITA-L or to unsubscribe, see http://www.ala.org/lita/involve/email

Ronald Houk ☕
Assistant Director
Ottumwa Public Library
102 W. Fourth Street
Ottumwa, IA 52501
(641)682-7563×203
rhouk@ottumwapubliclibrary.org

 

Subject: Re: [lita-l] Crowdsourced transcription tool?

 

If you’re interested in a fully hosted solution, you might also check out http://beta.fromthepage.com/. The underlying software is open source and you can install it locally as well.

Ben Brumfield, the guy who developed FromThePage also has a blog, http://manuscripttranscription.blogspot.com/, which has some useful information about different systems.

Danielle Cunniff Plumer

Texas State Library and Archives Commission

on digital literacy and old habits

“Academic libraries are concerned about the digital literacy of their users but their programs continue to be focused on the information components defined by the President’s Commission on Information Literacy.” (p. 45)

Cordell, R.  (2013). Library Instruction in the 21st Century. In: Rosanne, M (Ed.) Library Reference Services and Information Literacy: Models for Academic Institutions: Models for Academic Institutions. IGI Global.

More on digital literacy in this blog:

https://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/?s=library+digital+literacy