Posts Tagged ‘LinkedIn’

blochain credentialing in higher ed

2 reasons why blockchain tech has big, tangible implications for higher ed

By Jami Morshed September 27th, 2017

What Is Blockchain?

blockchain is a database or digital ledger. The data in the ledger is arranged in batches known as blocks, with each block storing data about a specific transaction. The blocks are linked together using cryptographic validation to form an unbroken and unbreakable chain–hence the name blockchain. As it relates to bitcoin, the blocks are monetary units, and the chain includes information about all past transactions of that monetary unit.

Importantly, the database (i.e., the series of blocks) is duplicated thousands of times across a network of computers, meaning that it has no one central repository. This not only means that the records are truly public, but also that there is no centralized version of the data for a hacker to corrupt. In order to make changes to the ledger, consensus between all members of the group must be obtained, further adding to the system’s security.

1. Blockchain for the Future of Credentialing

With today’s technologies, graduates and prospective employers must go through a tedious process to obtain student transcripts or diplomas, and this complexity is compounded when these credentials are spread across multiple institutions. Not only that, but these transcripts can take days or weeks to produce and send, and usually require a small fee be paid to the institution.LinkedLinek

This could be a key enabler to facilitate student ownership of this data and would allow them to instantly produce secure and comprehensive credentials to any institute or employer requesting them, including information about a student’s performance on standardized tests, degree requirements, extracurricular activities, and other learning activities.

Blockchain could play a major role in Competency-Based Education (CBE) programs and micro-credentialing, which are becoming ever more popular across universities and internal business training programs.

various companies are currently working on such a system of record. One of the most well-known is called “BlockCert,” which is an open standard created by MIT Media Lab and which the institute hopes will help drive the adoption of blockchain credentialing.

imagine the role that LinkedIn or a similar platform could play in the distribution of such content. Beyond verification of university records, LinkedIn could become a platform for sharing verified work history and resumes as well, making the job application process far simpler

2. Blockchain’s Financial Implications and Student debt

how could blockchain influence student finances? For starters, financial aid and grants could be tied to student success. Instead of students and universities having to send over regular progress reports on a recipient’s performance, automatic updates to a student’s digital record would ensure that benchmarks were being met–and open up new opportunities for institutions looking to offer merit-based grants.

Electronic tuition payments and money transfers could also simplify the tuition process. This is an especially appealing option for international students, as bitcoin’s interchangeable nature and lack of special fees for international transfers makes it a simpler and more cost-effective payment method.

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more on credentialing in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=credentialing

more on blockchain credentialing in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2016/10/03/blockchain-credentialing/

interactivity for the library

In 2015, former library dean purchased two large touch-screen monitors (I believe paid $3000 each). Shortly before that, I had offered to the campus fitting applications for touch screens (being that large screens or mobiles):

Both applications fit perfect the idea of interactivity in teaching (and learning) – http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=interactivity

With the large touch screens, I proposed to have one of the large screens, positioned outside in the Miller Center lobby and used as a dummy terminal (50” + screens run around $700) to mount educational material (e.g. Guenter Grass’s celebration of his work: http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2015/04/15/gunter-grass-1927-2015/ ) and have students explore by actively engaging, rather than just passively absorbing information. The bus-awaiting students are excellent potential users and they visibly are NOT engaged by by the currently broadcasted information on these screens, but can be potentially engaged if such information is restructured in interactive content.

The initial library administration approval was stalled by a concern with students “opening porno sites” while the library is closed which, indeed, would have been a problem.

My 2015 inquiry with the IT technicians about freezing a browser and a specific tab, which could prevent such issues, but it did not go far (pls see solution below). Failing to secure relatively frigid environment on the touch screen, the project was quietly left to rot.

I am renewing my proposal to consider the rather expensive touch screen monitors, which have been not utilized to their potential, and test my idea to engage students in a meaningful knowledge-building by using these applications to either create content or engage with content created by others.

Further, I am proposing that I investigate with campus faculty the possibility to bring the endeavor a step further by having a regularly-meeting group to develop engaging content using these and similar apps; for their own classes or any other [campus-related] activities. The incentive can be some reward, after users and creators “vote” the best (semester? Academic year?) project. The less conspicuous benefit will be the exposure of faculty to modern technology; some of the faculty are still abiding by lecturing style, other faculty, who seek interactivity are engulfed in the “smart board” fiction. Engaging the faculty in the touch screen creation of teaching materials will allow them to expand the practice to their and their students’ mobile devices. The benefit for the library will be the “hub” of activities, where faculty can learn from each other experience[s] in the library, rather than in their own departments/school only. The reward will be an incentive from the upper administration (document to attach in PDR?). I will need both your involvement/support. Tom Hergert by helping me rally faculty interest and the administrators incentivizing faculty to participate in the initial project, until it gains momentum and recognition.

In the same fashion, as part of the aforementioned group or separate, I would like to host a regularly-meeting group of students, who besides play and entertainment, aim the same process of creating interactive learning materials for their classes/projects. Same “best voted” process by peers. My preferable reward: upper administration is leaving recommendation in the students’ Linkedin account for future employers. I will need both your involvement/support. The student union can be decisive in bringing students to this endeavor.  Both of you have more cloud with the student union then only a regular faculty such as me.

In regard to the security (porn alert, see above) I have the agreement of Dr. Tirthankar Ghos with the IS Department. Dr. Ghosh will be most pleased to announce as a class project the provision of a secure environment for the touch screen monitor to be left after the group meetings for “use” by students in the library. Dr. Ghosh is, however, concerned/uncertain with the level of cooperation from IT, considering that for his students to enable such environment, they have to have the “right” access; namely behind firewalls, administrative privileges etc. Each of you will definitely be more persuasive with Phil Thorson convincing him in the merit of having IS student work with SCSU IT technician, since it is a win-win situation: the IT technician does not have to “waste time” (as in 2015) and resolve an issue and the IS student will be having a project-based, real-life learning experience by enabling the project under the supervision of the IT technician. Besides: a. student-centered, project-based learning; b. IT technician time saved, we also aim c. no silos / collaborative SCSU working environment, as promised by the reorganization process.

university web page

Posted in LinkedIn by Jonathan Moser

Check Out Thayer Academy’s new site: from Camps and Campus Maps to Infographics, History, and even some Digital Storytelling:

Home: http://www.thayer.org/
Camp Thayer: https://lnkd.in/e6CVMmk
Campus Map: https://lnkd.in/eu9aUGm
History of Thayer: https://lnkd.in/eSzgEbr
Facts & Figures: https://lnkd.in/eH_F6za

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see also
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2016/03/23/library-social-media-strategy/

 

ePortfolio patterns

Learning made visible: successful ePortfolio patterns across the U.S.

  • Register for first AAEEBL webinar of 2015-2016 on September 16 at 1 pm US EDT.  Jeff Yan of Digication addressing
    “Learning made visible: successful ePortfolio patterns across the U.S.” 

Jeff, a former academic, is the CEO of Digication, one of the most successful eportfolio companies in the U. S.  He will help us understand the big picture:  how are eportfolios being used on campuses and what works best.

This Webinar is co-sponsored by AAC&U, EPAC and IJeP.

Once you register, you will see an acknowledgement page with the URL to go to on Wednesday. You will not need a password.

Recording available:
https://aaeebl.adobeconnect.com/_a1112910704/p7rqj8k25l4/?launcher=false&fcsContent=true&pbMode=normal

The International Journal of ePortfolio (IJeP) is a double-blind, peer-reviewed, open access journal freely available online. http://www.theijep.com/

https://pathbrite.com/

https://pathbrite.com/u1545957793/profile

digication https://www.digication.com/

Pebble Pad http://www.pebblepad.co.uk/

Portfolium https://portfolium.com/

Using an ePortfolio to Assess the Outcomes of a First-Year Seminar: Student Narrative and Authentic Assessment; http://www.theijep.com/pdf/IJEP133.pdf

http://eportfolio.nd.edu/

Association for Authentic, Experiential and Evidence-Based Learning http://www.aaeebl.org/

themes: strong admin support, instructional design

crowdsourcing: teacher asks students to respond to critical thinking q/s and students populate their eportfolio

make learning visible for ” students, faculty, institution and employer

E-Portfolios: Competency Marketplaces For Colleges
http://www.forbes.com/sites/ryancraig/2015/07/29/e-portfolios-competency-marketplaces-for-colleges/
only 13% of Millennials are using LinkedIn and only 7% more have future plans to do so. As I think about it, this makes sense. LinkedIn’s content isn’t directed at traditional-age college students. And few students have professional relationships or relevant work experience to show, which is the whole point of $LNKD.

How does the ePortfolio support in helping students achieve those goals. The ePortfolio should not be another thing they (and the faculty) need to do on top of everything else they are already doing.

 

 

employment for college graduates

Yesterday, we shared information about the new Coffee App
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2014/10/01/coffee-the-app/
which offers easy approach to job search.

Please have the following article regarding LinkedIn and their approach to job search

Ranking and Networking

https://www.insidehighered.com/news/2014/10/02/new-rankings-system-linkedin-based-employment-outcomes-huge-sample

The new Linkedin ranking system (https://www.linkedin.com/edu/rankings/us) tracks the success of college graduates in eight broad career paths, adding weight for jobs deemed “desirable.” It lists the top 25 institutions in each career category.

LinkedIn is ranking only a tiny swath of the academy.

LinkedIn also released a social networking application for prospective students to chat with each other about colleges, and to talk with current students.

This Week in Social Media: Vine Introduces New Camera. Twitter add features,

This Week in Social Media:

http://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/new-vine-camera-week-social-media/

Vine becomes more complex/potent and gets in closer competition with YouTube, Twitter gets in a closer closer competition with Facebook, YouTube becomes more complex, Facebook is further pushing adds in our lives, LinkedIn gets closer with SlideShare

Vine Introduces New Camera: “The new camera offers powerful ways to edit your videos, as well as the ability to import existing videos on your phone and turn them into Vines.”

Twitter Updates Timeline Feed: “Additionally, when we identify a tweet, an account to follow or other content that’s popular or relevant, we may add it to your timeline. This means you will sometimes see tweets from accounts you don’t follow.”

YouTube Updates App: “This YouTube app on TV will make it easier to find what you want through the Guide, and it brings you all the playlists, shelves and branding from channels.”

Facebook Updates Ad Policy: The change increases “the number of times people can see ads from a page in their news feed per day.”

LinkedIn Announces Rollout of Premium Features to All SlideShare Users: “Now, all users will have access to our most popular premium features that include detailed analytics, profile customization and additional upload options, like video and private uploads.”

Social Media: Orkut – the end of an era…

Some [many] of you might have received the email on the bottom of this IMS blog

Orkut (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orkut), created by a Turkish computer specialist was a strong contestant of Facebook and MySpace (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Myspace) in the early days when Mark Zuckerberg was only a college kid. While LinkedIn was brought to oblivion by Facebook and reinvented itself as a site for selfstarters/artist, Orkut became the “Facebook” for Brazil and India.
Purchased by Google in 2008, it was doomed when Google+ came to existence.

Pulling the plug on Orkut signifies closes the first chapter on the history of social media

From: orkut <3504732672376623859@mail.orkut.com>
Date: July 5, 2014 at 2:30:29 AM CDT
Subject: A Farewell to Orkut
Reply-To: orkut <noreply-orkut@google.com>

A Farewell to Orkut

After ten years of sparking conversations and forging connections, we have decided it’s time for us to start saying goodbye to Orkut. Over the past decade, YouTube, Blogger and Google+ have taken off, with communities springing up in every corner of the world. Because the growth of these communities has outpaced Orkut’s growth, we’ve decided to focus our energy and resources on making these other social platforms as amazing as possible for everyone who uses them.

We will shut down Orkut on September 30, 2014. Until then, there will be no impact on you, so you may have time to manage the transition. You can export your profile data, community posts and photos using Google Takeout (available until September 2016). We are preserving an archive of all public communities, which will be available online starting September 30, 2014. If you don’t want your posts or name to be included in the community archive, you can remove Orkut permanently from your Google account. Please visit our Help Center for any further details.

It’s been a great 10 years, and we apologize to those of you still actively using the service. We hope you will find other online communities to spark more conversations and build even more connections for the next decade and beyond.

Facebook’s referral traffic share grew over 37% in Q1 2014, Pinterest was up 48%, Twitter increased only 1%

Facebook’s referral traffic share grew over 37% in Q1 2014, Pinterest was up 48%, Twitter increased only 1%

http://thenextweb.com/facebook/2014/04/21/facebooks-referral-traffic-share-grew-37-q1-2014-pinterest-48-twitter-increased-1/

Shareaholic SOcial Media Traffic Referrals

Once again, the real winner here is Facebook, Pinterest may be able to challenge it soon though, as it is now driving just over a third of the traffic Facebook is.

http://www.edudemic.com/social-media-in-education/

How Social Media Is Being Used In Education

good graph on the bottom of the article (http://www.edudemic.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/10/social-media-for-teaching.jpg)

  • The level of personal use of social media among faculty (70.3 percent) mirrors that of the general population
  • 55 percent of faculty use social media in a professional context (any aspect of their profession outside of teaching), up from 44.7 percent last year
  • Only 41 percent of faculty use social media in the classroom, but this use continues to experience steady year-to-year growth
  • Faculty are sophisticated consumers of social media. They match different sites to their varying personal, professional, and teaching needs
  • Concerns remain about privacy, maintaining the class as a private space for free and open discussion, and the integrity of student submissions
  • Most faculty agree that “the interactive nature of online and mobile technologies create better learning environments” and that digital communication has increased communication with students
  • Faculty believe that online and mobile technologies can be distracting, and that they have resulted in longer working hours and more stress

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