Posts Tagged ‘psychology’

adler maslow rogers

Alfred Adler

http://www.muskingum.edu/~psych/psycweb/history/adler.htm

Adler examined personality around the same time as Carl Jung and Sigmund Freud. They worked on some theories together until Adler rejected Freud’s emphasis on sex, and maintained that personality difficulties are rooted in a feeling of inferiority deriving from restrictions on the individual’s need for self-assertion.

Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs

by published 2007, updated 2016

http://www.simplypsychology.org/maslow.html

Carl Rogers

http://www.simplypsychology.org/carl-rogers.html

agreed with the main assumptions of Abraham Maslow, but added that for a person to “grow”, they need an environment that provides them with genuineness (openness and self-disclosure), acceptance (being seen with unconditional positive regard), and empathy (being listened to and understood).

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more about psychology in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=psychology

Social Media Psychology

How Social Media Psychology Makes You Look More Attractive

G+ link: https://plus.google.com/+WadeHarman/posts/1YCiL7JeGhS

http://www.buildyourownblog.net/blog/social-media-psychology-wade-harman/?social=matplus18aug

Wade Harman is a digital business consultant specializing in Social Media Psychology. He is also a keynote speaker and hosts The Social Brain Podcast.

What Do You Mean By, ”Social Media Psychology Strategy”?

ninety-percent of purchasing decisions are made subconsciously and you know that’s a pretty big purchase thing there. Products that evoke emotions, they will always win with your customers.

George Lowenstein says “a major part of our brain is busy with automatic processes, not conscious thinking.” Ain’t that funny?

We all know social media is the front door to our content. But why aren’t they coming in? So if they’re not coming to your – quote unquote ”door”. If they’re not coming to your door, then you’ve not impacted them on a positive psychological level. Social media psychology is the back door.

It’s All About Making An Attractive ”Doorway”

how people clique on Twitter, what causes that clique. What causes that conversion, that lead. Topics like this are what make up social media psychology.

I will be bringing in, like I said certain influencers every month. Talking about their own experiences with social media and blogging content marketing and what have you in these lab classes.

So I needed help with people with large followings. People that had trust with their audience. I needed those people to share my content. So my voice could be heard quicker and so I began to stop blogging so much… I still blog, but I was blogging three time s a week and that’s a lot to blog. That really is.
So I began to understand that I needed to start building relationships. Now I’m blessed to have a lot of different resources at my fingertips. I have built those relationships with a lot of people from average Joe’s like me to influencers like Jay Baer and understand how a small business owner can go and get their voice heard online.

Reticular Formation

So that’s why there’s a huge need for The Think Tank Community I believe. Not only are we showing you how to target you audience, but we’re also showing you how to wake them up using social media psychology.

my note: do we need a think tank community for educators?

What Do You Do When There’s No More Engagement?

So wake somebody up out of their reticular formation, you target that audience and you already know that, you’ve already done that. You’re going to be an expert on Twitter, okay and so you’re not getting any feed back. You’re not getting any engagement.

So what do you do?

You niche down, you niche down. This is the way you wake these people up. Yes, when you niche down your audience gets a little bit smaller, but you keep nicheing.

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[much] more on social media in this IMS blog:

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=social+media

Ethical Considerations For Using Virtual Reality

Five Ethical Considerations For Using Virtual Reality with Children and Adolescents

Five Ethical Considerations For Using Virtual Reality with Children and Adolescents

G+ link https://plus.google.com/+TessPajaron/posts/8YYgjoPrQvq

In an address to the VRX conference in San Francisco, noted game developer and tech wizard, Jesse Schell predicted that over 8 million VR gamer headsets will be sold in 2016. Facebook purchased Oculus Rift, presumably laying the groundwork for a future where friends and family will interact in rich virtual spaces. All the major players, including Microsoft, Sony, Samsung, Google and an HTC and Valve partnership are jostling for the consumer headset market.

Experimenting with VR in his classes as part of a project piloted by Seattle-based foundry10, a privately funded research organization that creates partnerships with educators to implement, research and explore the various intersections of emerging technologies and learning, including VR..

And the technology’s potential for good is vast. It has already been used to help with autism, improve personal financial management, treat PTSD and manage pain. More and more news outlets, including the New York Times, are adopting immersive journalism, where news stories can be experienced through VR.

As an educational tool, VR might prove transformative. Google Expeditions allows students to take over 100 virtual journeys from ancient Rome to the surface of Mars. It might also have a big impact on social emotional learning (SEL), as VR’s unique ability to produce empathy recently led Wired magazine to explore its potential as “the ultimate empathy machine”. Addressing a persistent anxiety, Suter used Samsung Gear’s Public Speaking Simulator to successfully prepare a few nervous students for class presentations, reporting they felt “much more calm” during the live delivery.

Ethical Considerations

In a recently published article, researchers Michael Madary and Thomas K. Metzinger from Johannes Gutenberg University in Germany review a series of ethical considerations when implementing VR. The illusion of embodiment may provide VR’s greatest value to education, but also lies at the heart of its ethical implementation. Madary and Metzinger believe that VR is not just an evolution from television and video game screens, but a revolution that will have an enormous social impact. In their paper, they claim that:

VR technology will eventually change not only our general image of humanity but also our understanding of deeply entrenched notions, such as “conscious experience,” “selfhood,” “authenticity,” or “realness.”

It’s important to remember that many current VR uses in schools, like Google Expeditions, are not interactive VR, but simply 360-degree video experiences. In these cases, students experience immersive 3D pictures or panoramas, but do not deeply interact with the content. The illusion of embodiment is a product of interactive content and motion tracking, where users can alter and affect their environment and engage with others who share their virtual space. Headsets like the Vive and Occulus Rift fall under this latter category, but it won’t be long before most, if not all, consumer oriented VR technology will be completely immersive and interactive.

1. Long-Term Effects and Prolonged Exposure

2. The Impact of Environment on Agency and Behavior

3. Aggravating Preexisting Psychological or Emotional Issues

4. (Un)Reality and Diminished Real World Interactions

5. Privacy and Data Gathering

 

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more on virtual reality in this IMS blog

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=virtual+reality

cultural differences

Chinese, Americans Truly See Differently, Study Says

John Roach for National Geographic NewsAugust 22, 2005

http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2005/08/0822_050822_chinese.html

Richard Nisbett, a psychologist at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor.

Westerners and Easterners see the world differently

http://www.newscientist.com/article.ns?id=dn7882

Helping a psychology student from Edinburgh Napier with his essay:

To what extent have the new generation of psychodynamic psychoanalysts addressed the issues raised by the ferocious critiques of Freud’s work that have emerged?

Almond, R. (2006). How do we bridge the gap? Commentary on Luyten, Blatt, and Corveleyn. Journal of the American Psychoanalytic Association, 54(2), 611–618.

Ambrosio, J. (2010). A Fearsome Trap: The will to know, the obligation to confess, and the Freudian subject of desire. Educational Philosophy & Theory, 42(7), 728–741.

Appelbaum, J. (2013). Psychoanalysis and philosophy: Nurturing dialogues. The American Journal of Psychoanalysis, 73(2), 117–120.

Auxéméry, Y. (2015). « Névrose » et « Psychose »: Quelles définitions pour la psychiatrie contemporaine ? = “Neurosis” and “psychosis”: What definitions for contemporary psychiatry? Annales Médico-Psychologiques, 173(8), 643–648. http://doi.org/10.1016/j.amp.2014.12.015

Brookes, C. E. (2015). Review of From classical to contemporary psychoanalysis: A critique and integration. Psychodynamic Psychiatry, 43(4), 507–512.

Cohen, J. (2007). Interdisciplinary Psychoanalysis and the Education of Children: Psychoanalytic and Educational Partnerships. Psychoanalytic Study of the Child, 62, 180–207.

Cooper-White, P. (2002). “Higher Powers and Infernal Regions”: Models of Mind in Freud’s Interpretation of Dreams and Contemporary Psychoanalysis, and Their Implications for Pastoral Theology. Pastoral Psychology, 50(5), 319–343.

Cooper-White, P. (2014). Review of Psychoanalysis, monotheism and morality: The Sigmund Freud Museum Symposia, 2009–2011. Journal of the American Psychoanalytic Association, 62(6), 1163–1170. http://doi.org/10.1177/0003065114558924

Cortina, M. (2012). Review of Psychoanalysis and motivational systems. A new look. Psychodynamic Psychiatry, 40(2), 357–364.

Daldin, H. (1988). The fate of the sexually abused child. Clinical Social Work Journal, 16(1), 22–32.

Dimen, M. (2014). Inside the Revolution: Power, Sex, and Technique in Freud’s “‘Wild’ Analysis”. Psychoanalytic Dialogues, 24(5), 499–515.

Eckardt, M. H. (2003). Evolution of psychoanalysis. Journal of the American Academy of Psychoanalysis, 31(4), 726–728.

Eliman, S. J. (2005). Rothstein as a Self and Object Freudian. Psychoanalytic Dialogues, 15(3), 459–471.

Friedman, N. (1976). From the experiential in therapy to experiential psychotherapy: A history. Psychotherapy: Theory, Research & Practice, 13(3), 236–243. http://doi.org/10.1037/h0088347

Golding, R. (1982). Freud, psychoanalysis, and sociology:  some observations on the sociological analysis of the individual. British Journal of Sociology, 33(4), 545–562.

Gordon, P. (2014). Radical analyses? Psychodynamic Practice, 20(1), 68–74.

Granqvist, P. (2006). On the relation between secular and divine relationships: An emerging attachment perspective and a critique of the “depth” approaches. International Journal for the Psychology of Religion, 16(1), 1–18. http://doi.org/10.1207/s15327582ijpr1601_1

Greenwood, D. (2010). Embracing the “allegiance effect” as a positive quality in research into the psychological therapies-exploring the concept of “influence”. European Journal of Psychotherapy & Counselling, 12(1), 41–54.

Hansen, I. A. (2007). Buddhist Influences on the Idea of the Unconscious. Psychological Perspectives, 50(2), 181–197.

Jeffrey M JJ Jackson. (2008). Philosophy as Melancholia: Freud, Kant, Foucault. Psychoanalysis, Culture & Society, 13(3), 299–315.

Jones, G. Y. (1999). “Beyond the Oedipal Complex”:  Freud and Lacan revisited. Psychodynamic Counselling, 5(4), 453.

Kerr, J. (2012). Review of From classical to contemporary psychoanalysis: A critique and integration. Psychoanalytic Review, 99(5), 785–792.

Knoblauch, S. H. (2005). Body Rhythms and the Unconscious: Toward an Expanding of Clinical Attention. Psychoanalytic Dialogues, 15(6), 807–827.

Kronemyer, D. E. (2011). Freud’s Illusion: New Approaches to Intractable Issues. International Journal for the Psychology of Religion, 21(4), 249–275.

Kruger, L.-M. (2006). A tribute to 150 years of Sigmund Freud: Not mastering the mind: Freud and the “Forgotten Material” of Psychology. Psycho-Analytic Psychotherapy in South Africa, 14(2), 1–12.

Lee, N.-N. (2014). Sublimated or castrated psychoanalysis? Adorno’s critique of the revisionist psychoanalysis: An introduction to “The Revisionist Psychoanalysis”. Philosophy & Social Criticism, 40(3), 309–338.

Lenthall, A. (2007). Review of Psychotherapy and phenomenology: On Freud, Husserl and Heidegger. Psychodynamic Practice: Individuals, Groups and Organisations, 13(4), 423–427. http://doi.org/10.1080/14753630701609939

Lothane, Z. (2006). Freud’s legacy–is it still with us? Psychoanalytic Psychology, 23(2), 285–301. http://doi.org/10.1037/0736-9735.23.2.285

Metcalf, R. (2000). THE TRUTH OF SHAME-CONSCIOUSNESS IN FREUD AND PHENOMENOLOGY. Journal of Phenomenological Psychology, 31(1), 1–18.

Mook, B. (2007). Review of Psychotherapy and phenomenology. The Humanistic Psychologist, 35(4), 401–403. http://doi.org/10.1080/08873260701593417

Moyaert, P. (2013). The Death Drive and the Nucleus of the Ego: An Introduction to Freudian Metaphysics. Southern Journal of Philosophy, 51, 94–119.

Noys, B. (2009). Revolution in Psychology: Alienation to Emancipation The Lacanian Left: Psychoanalysis, Theory, and Politics. Historical Materialism, 17(1), 183–190.

Palombo, J. (2013). The Self As a Complex Adaptive System Part I: Complexity, Metapsychology, and Developmental Theories. Psychoanalytic Social Work, 20(1), 1–25.

Pavón-Cuéllar, D. (2014). The Freudo-Marxist Tradition and the Critique of Psychotherapeutic Ideology. Psychotherapy & Politics International, 12(3), 208–219.

Pedroni, I. (2015). Finding New Ways of Belonging Through Religious Experience in the Framework of a Therapeutic Encounter. International Journal of Psychoanalytic Self Psychology, 10(4), 343–354.

Price, M. (1995). The illusion of theory: Discussion of R. D. Chessick’s “Poststructural psychoanalysis or wild analysis?.” Journal of the American Academy of Psychoanalysis, 23(1), 63–70.

Robinson, P. (1985). FREUD UNDER SIEGE. Halcyone (01986449), 7, 1–15.

Rogers, R. (1989). Review of The Psychotic Core. Psychoanalytic Psychology, 6(3), 367–373. http://doi.org/10.1037/h0079741

Samuels, R. (1998). Passing beyond ego psychology: Freud, Lacan and the end of analysis. Clinical Studies: International Journal of Psychoanalysis, 4(1), 93–104.

Schafer, R. (1970). Requirements for a critique of the theory of catharsis. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 35(1, Pt.1), 13–17. http://doi.org/10.1037/h0029613

Schafer, R. (1975). Psychoanalysis without psychodynamics. The International Journal of Psychoanalysis, 56(1), 41–55.

Shafranske, E. P. (1992). A Psychoanalytic Response to Hood. International Journal for the Psychology of Religion, 2(3), 161.

SHILL, M. (2011). Intersubjectivity and the Ego. Psychoanalytic Social Work, 18(1), 1–22.

Thomas, A. (2007). Practical Irrationality, Reflexivity and Sartre’s Regress Argument. Teorema, 26(3), 113–121.

Tillman, J. G. (1998). Psychodynamic psychotherapy, religious beliefs, and self-disclosure. American Journal of Psychotherapy, 52(3), 273.

Wax, M. L. (1995). Method as Madness: Science, hermeneutics, and art in psychoanalysis. Journal of the American Academy of Psychoanalysis, 23(4), 525–543.

Webster, J. (2013). Critique and cure: A dream of uniting psychoanalysis and philosophy. The American Journal of Psychoanalysis, 73(2), 138–157. http://doi.org/10.1057/ajp.2013.1

Weinberger, J., & Westen, D. (2001). Science and psychodynamics: From arguments about Freud to data. Psychological Inquiry, 12(3), 129–132. http://doi.org/10.1207/S15327965PLI1203_02

Zepf, S. (2012). Repression and Substitutive Formation: The Relationship Between Freud’s Concepts Reconsidered. Psychoanalytic Review, 99(3), 397–420.

Zepf, S. (2013). Abwehr, Verdrängung und Ersatzbildung: Die Beziehung zwischen Freuds Konzepten neu organisiert. Defence, Repression and Substitutive Formation: The Relationship between Freud’s Reorganized Concepts, 29(4), 499–515.

Academic Journal

By: Freeman, Tabitha. Studies in Gender & Sexuality. Spring2008, Vol. 9 Issue 2, p113-139. 27p. DOI: 10.1080/15240650801935156., Database: EBSCO MegaFILE

Subjects: ESSAY (Literary form); PSYCHOANALYSIS; FATHERHOOD; OEDIPUS complex; PARENT & child; FATHER & child; PATRILINEAL kinship

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SocioInt2015

http://socioint15.org

SOCIO-INT15- 2nd INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON EDUCATION SOCIAL SCIENCES AND HUMANITIES will be held in Istanbul (Turkey), on the 8th, 9th and 10th of June 2015 is an interdisciplinary international conference that invites academics, independent scholars and researchers from around the world to meet and exchange the latest ideas and discuss issues concerning all fields of Education, Social Sciences and Humanities.

Socioint15_Accepted_Abstracts1

SOCIO-INT15 provides the ideal opportunity to bring together professors, researchers and high education students of different disciplines, discuss new issues, and discover the most recent developments, new trends and researches in education, social sciences and humanities.

Academics making efforts in education, subfields of which might include higher education, early childhood education, adult education, special education, e-learning, language education, etc. are highly welcomed. People without papers can also participate in this conference as audience so long as they find it interesting and meaningful.

Due to the nature of the conference with its focus on innovative ideas and developments, papers also related to all areas of social sciences including communication, accounting, finance, economics, management, business, marketing, education, sociology, psychology, political science, law and other areas of social sciences; also all areas of humanities including anthropology, archaelogy, architecture, art, ethics, folklore studies, history, language studies, literature, methodological studies, music, philosophy, poetry and theater are invited for the international conference.

Submitted papers will be subject to peer review and evaluated based on originality and clarity of exposition.