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Everyone is Replaceable

“Everyone is Replaceable” and Other Business Lies

https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/20141209145608-52594–everyone-is-replaceable-and-other-business-lies

Only fearful managers say “Everyone is replaceable.” Fearful managers say other hateful things, too, things like “I don’t pay you to think” and “That’s my decision, not yours.” Those fearful statements make it easy to tell which managers are deserving of your talents and which aren’t.

My note:
This line “Everyone is Replaceable” is ascribed to Stalin. In 1939, when he was sending his top officers to the Gulag, later not able to stop Hitler’s 1941 invasion.
When I heard the same expression from my former boss, I was thinking about Sting’s song: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WNt5iK8EuAU
I was pleased to read the article and I agree with the ideas laid out.
However, it was an eye opener to read also the comments. I realized that the “managers” (even if some of them claimed they are “leaders”) are very critical toward the ideas. I realized that throughout reading the article, I was identifying myself with an “employee,” not the “manager” view point.
It is sad to see how critical the “managers” where toward the article, how behind they are the times; since the technocrat management is passe and people now long for a “human” leadership (Friedman’s “The World is Flat.”)
I was also flabbergasted to read the comments of all these experienced administrators, who cannot see the forest, only the three. Is it cultural? Generational? Gender-based? Whatever it is, it certainly does not paint pleasant picture for the work environment around us, the employees.

Instructional sessions for Adobe Creative Suite and other technologies available

Instructional sessions for Adobe Creative Suite and other technologies available

Good morning all,

Please consider one-on-one and/or team sessions regarding the use of the Adobe Creative Suite as well as the use of other technologies in the educational process.

Please contact InforMedia Services (IMS), ims@stcloudstate.edu, for any questions, scheduling etc.

IMS (http://lrts.stcloudstate.edu/library/general/ims/default.asp) consists of faculty, who are willing and able to help faculty, staff and students with their academic endeavors in technology. We offer one-on-one sessions, workshops, instructional sessions and in-class technology instructions.

Follow us:

IMS blog: http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/ (keyword: mobile devices)

Twitter: https://twitter.com/SCSUtechinstruc

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/InforMediaServices?ref=hl

Pinterest: http://www.pinterest.com/scsutechnology/

Instagram: http://instagram.com/scsutechinstruct

YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC_UMIE5r6YB8KzTF5nZJFyA

Google +: https://plus.google.com/u/0/115966710162153290760/posts/p/pub

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/scsuinstructionaltechnology

Since IMS does not have access to the FacultyStaffAll listserv and cannot reach all campus as the message below, please feel welcome and encouraged to forward this email to your colleagues across unions.

Have a successful new academic year.

 

 

From: SCSU Information Technology
Sent: Tuesday, August 26, 2014 8:26 AM
To: FacultyStaffAll
Subject: Adobe Creative Cloud Site License

 

We are pleased to announce that we have renewed the Adobe site license for university-owned computers on campus.  This means that the Adobe Creative Cloud Master Collection (includes Acrobat, Photoshop, InDesign, Illustrator, Dreamweaver, After Effects, Premier Pro, Fireworks, Flash, Lightroom, and more) is able to be installed on any university-owned computer at no additional cost to you.

 

Campus Use

If you would like the use of these applications, please email huskytech@stcloudstate.edu with the details of which applications you would like installed on your university-owned computer.  Because it is the first week of the semester and technicians are quite busy right now, we ask for your patience with these installations.
NOTE: Not all campus computers are capable of running these programs. A technician will work with you to make sure your computer is capable of running this software before installing.

 

Personal Use

In addition, this campus site license includes a copy of Adobe Master Collection that can be installed on a faculty or staff person’s home computer for a yearly fee of $9.75.
Link to purchase personal version:  http://stcloudstate.onthehub.com/WebStore/OfferingDetails.aspx?o=c7e8f835-08b1-e311-93fb-b8ca3a5db7a1
NOTE: Students are NOT eligible for this at-home use.  Students can purchase Adobe Creative Cloud for a monthly fee of $19.99.

 

Please contact HuskyTech at 320-308-7000 or huskytech@stcloudstate.edu with any questions!

 

Thank you,

Casey Gordon
Technology Support Services Director
Information Technology Services
MC 112C | 320-308-4711 | cjgordon@stcloudstate.edu
St. Cloud State University

Iris Murdoch on Storytelling

Iris Murdoch on Storytelling, Why Art Is Essential for Democracy, and the Key to Good Writing

“A good society contains many different artists doing many different things. A bad society coerces artists because it knows that they can reveal all kinds of truths.”

“Storytelling is a tool for knowing who we are and what we want.” Ursula K. Le Guin

philosopher and novelist Iris Murdoch (July 15, 1919–February 8, 1999) — one of the most lucid and luminous minds of the twentieth century — explored in a long, deep, immensely insightful 1977 conversation with the British broadcaster and philosopher Bryan McGee, which aired on McGee’s television series Men of Ideas.

Existentialists and Mystics: Writings on Philosophy and Literature (public library).

the fundamental difference between the function of philosophy and that of art — one being to clarify and concretize, the other to mystify and expand.

A century after Nietzsche examined the power of language to both conceal and reveal truth, and several years before Oliver Sacks’s trailblazing insight into narrative as the pillar of identity, Murdoch considers how we, as storytelling creatures, use language in the parallel arts of literature and living

Hemingway’s admonition against the dangers of ego in creative work. distinguish a recognisable style from a personal presence. 

bridging William James’s landmark assertion that “a purely disembodied human emotion is a nonentity” and Tolstoy’s insistence that “emotional infectiousness” is what separates good art from the bad

There is always more bad art around than good art, and more people like bad art than like good art.

James Baldwin wielded the double-edged sword of the artist’s duty to society, Murdoch insists on this largeness: The artist’s duty is to art, to truth-telling in his own medium, the writer’s duty is to produce the best literary work of which he is capable, and he must find out how this can be done.

In consonance with John F. Kennedy’s exhortation to a propaganda-smothered society — “We must never forget that art is not a form of propaganda; it is a form of truth.”
(My note: Lenin – Art is always political. He did not distinguish art and propaganda. http://soviethistory.msu.edu/1924-2/socialist-cinema/socialist-cinema-texts/lenin-on-the-most-important-of-the-arts/)

after the teenage Sylvia Plath precociously observed that “once a poem is made available to the public, the right of interpretation belongs to the reader,”Murdoch examines the laboratory for reflection and interpretation
My note: on Sylvia Plath, see Elif Shafak’s Black Milk: https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/9923549-black-milk

Susan Sontag’s beautiful wisdom on storytelling and what it means to be a moral human being, Murdoch weighs the relationship between morality and truth, as mediated by language

Rebecca West on storytelling as a survival mechanism,

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more on storytelling in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=storytelling

SCSU students invited for VR experience

The SCSU VIzLab , InforMedia Services, and the SCSU Marriage and Family Program are conducting a pilot study to explore possible applications of Virtual Reality technology.

We are currently seeking student volunteer participants.

They will be asked to take part in a short virtual reality experience, about 10 minutes long, followed by a brief survey.

The goal of this experience is to help determine the effectiveness of current VR technology and 360° video as a potential resource for the university.

There are available times on the 23rd, 25th, and 30th of April, and 2nd of May. 
The experience will be held in ISELF 118 (first floor), the lounge just off the lobby (pls see map).
As this data is just exploratory in nature, we are limiting the survey to 30 participants, so signup is required here:https://doodle.com/poll/d5iee9ixitxdv4cv

Please announce in your classes about this opportunity, and encourage interested students to contact:
Christine Waisner (cmwaisner@stcloudstate.edu),
Mark Gill (mcgill@stcloudstate.edu), or
Plamen Miltenoff (pmiltenoff@stcloudstate.edu) to schedule a time, or for more information.

detect plagiarism

Do we need to pay for services such as Turnitin?
Are there comparable services for free?
Do we need services such as those ones or we rather have faculty and students educated on plagiarism and faculty trained to detect plagiarism?
Is it supposed to be a “mechanical” process or educational activity?

These questions following a posting of today from the Educause Blended and Online Learning Group

Are any of you using a non-Turnitin plagiarism checker that you’re happy with (besides Google or Grammarly’s free service)?
Thanks,
Jenn Stevens (she, her, hers)
Director, Instructional Technology Group
403C Walker Building
Emerson College | 120 Boylston St | Boston, MA 02116
(617) 824-3093

At Ursinus, we use PlagScan, which is affordable and meets our needs.

We haven’t been able to get it to fully integrate within our LMS yet but hopefully we will be able to soon.

Christine Iannicelli
Instructional Technology Librarian
Library and IT
Library 124
Phone: 610-409-3466
ciannicelli@ursinus.edu

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more on TurnitIn in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=turnitin

more on alternatives and Grammarly
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=grammarly
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2017/08/16/grammarly-alternatives/

Tackling Data in Libraries

Tackling Data in Libraries: Opportunities and Challenges in Serving User Communities

Submit proposals at http://www.iolug.org

Deadline is Friday, March 1, 2019

Submissions are invited for the IOLUG Spring 2019 Conference, to be held May 10th in Indianapolis, IN. Submissions are welcomed from all types of libraries and on topics related to the theme of data in libraries.

Libraries and librarians work with data every day, with a variety of applications – circulation, gate counts, reference questions, and so on. The mass collection of user data has made headlines many times in the past few years. Analytics and privacy have, understandably, become important issues both globally and locally. In addition to being aware of the data ecosystem in which we work, libraries can play a pivotal role in educating user communities about data and all of its implications, both favorable and unfavorable.

The Conference Planning Committee is seeking proposals on topics related to data in libraries, including but not limited to:

  • Using tools/resources to find and leverage data to solve problems and expand knowledge,
  • Data policies and procedures,
  • Harvesting, organizing, and presenting data,
  • Data-driven decision making,
  • Learning analytics,
  • Metadata/linked data,
  • Data in collection development,
  • Using data to measure outcomes, not just uses,
  • Using data to better reach and serve your communities,
  • Libraries as data collectors,
  • Big data in libraries,
  • Privacy,
  • Social justice/Community Engagement,
  • Algorithms,
  • Storytelling, (https://web.stcloudstate.edu/pmiltenoff/lib490/)
  • Libraries as positive stewards of user data.

Future of Libraries with Instructional Design

Library 2.019 virtual mini-conference, “Shaping the Future of Libraries with Instructional Design

Wednesday, March 13th, from 12:00 – 3:00 pm US Pacific Daylight Time (click https://www.timeanddate.com/worldclock/fixedtime.html?msg=Library+2.019+ID&iso=20190313T12&p1=283&ah=3 to see in your local time zone).

Here are the links to the recordings of the sessions:
https://www.library20.com/page/recordings-id (you must be logged in)

This is a free event, thanks to our founding conference sponsor: School of Information at San José State University.

ATTENDING: We will send links for attending the conference a day or two before the event.

If you have friends or colleagues that wish to attend, this is a free event and we encourage you to share our information widely. However, please send them to the conference registration page (https://www.library20.com/instructionaldesign) rather than giving them the above link directly as it will allow us to track participation.

https://www.library20.com/instructionaldesign

https://www.library20.com/forum/categories/library-2-019-instructional-design-accepted-submissions/listForCategory

#library2019 #libraryid

Dana Bryant

Sandy Hirsch, SJSU School of Information.

Steven Bell, John Shank – integrating ID into practice. blended librarianship.

critical mass of librarians doing ID and libraries hiring IDs.

Michael Flierl
Assistant Professor of Library Science, Purdue University

Dana Bryant
Lead Instructional Technologist for Academic Technology Services, Woodruff Library, at Emory University

Lindsay O’Neill
Faculty, California State University, Fullerton’s Master of Science in Instructional Design and Technology Program

Steven J. Bell (moderator)

Associate University Librarian for Research and Instructional Services at Temple University

https://www.library20.com/page/library-2-0-schedule-gmt-4

What is ID: ID create an environment conductive to students’ success. Thoughtful and applied design. Making faculty and instructors’ life easier. Allow faculty to do what they do best.

Lindsey: solving the instructional problem with the tools at hand.

go-to ed tech? What is the hot tech right now?

Lindsey: H5P (open source) CC – licensed, Moodle, WordPress, build online tutorials for free (Isolde), Norway, well based, VR tours. Will H5P become paid? Michael: cell phones Dana: Emory VoiceThread. From the chat: Articulate365 (pricy), Kahoot, Peardeck, Yellowdig, vidgrid, Adobe Spark, Adobe POst, padlet, Groupme instead of Canvas, Vyond, Coggle, wakelet, Phinx

Suggestions for librarians who want to build ID skills. Dana: connect with the regional community if no ID on campus. Community of practice. Using ID tools, speakers outside of campus. Lindsey: teaching myself what is most interesting to me. what technologies are important. Find a learning community. Michael: repeat the others

keep up to date on ID theory and practices: Dana – ELI, OLC (Online Learning Consortium). ELearning Heroes. Lindsay: corporate word. Michael: POD

the one-shot instruction: what is the approach (q/n from the chat); Dana – ID as a services. person dedicated following up with people requested either ID class or training, open the line of communication. summative evaluation type of activity since we are failing to evaluate how well students absorbed the information. LIndsey: one-shot for basics (e.g. freshman), build scaffold program, reserved the one shot for meeting with librarians, for hands-on. Michael: work with faculty member and rewrite a program, build assessment rather then only deliver

areas of impact: subject matter librarians, working with faculty to use of the library resources, new faculty drawn in info and if not follow up, Canvas support.  Michael: librarians and ID working directly with faculty rewriting their curricula, measure it, demonstrating library need, 3000 students – correlation. document the lib contribution to student learning directly, the teaching-learning culture change. using info and data in more authentic ways. Lindsey: disconnect the way librarian teach vs faculty teach. Coordination scaffolding.

q/n from the chat. easily. how can non ID librarian can easily implement ID type:
Lindsey: new to ID? Google. Jargon and Acronyms. re framing how you see ed technology. technology as something to get the job done. no need to get fancy.
Dana: same as Lindsey. But also learning theories and learning outcomes. From ID perspective: what they will come out with by the end of the session. action words.
Michael: mindset. what students want to learn, before what I will teach. backward design – understanding by design. UDL. Grab a friend and talk through.
Tara

ed tech is not getting job done:
clickers for attendance is horrible idea.

 

from the chat:

Dee Fink’s Taxonomy of Significant Learning1

https://www.byui.edu/outcomes-and-assessment-old/the-basics/step-1-articulate-outcomes/dee-finks-taxonomy-of-significant-learning

https://www.alt.ac.uk/

Association of Talent Development

Christy Tucker’s blog – Experiencing E-Learning

https://www.issotl.com/2019

https://e-learning.zeef.com/tracy.parish

https://www.lib.umich.edu/blogs/tiny-studies/using-pilot-study-test-and-assess-new-instruction-model

http://suny.edu/emtech

I had a really interesting role in grad school where we lived in the land between tech support and pedagogical / design support.

From Rajesh Kumar Das to All panelists and other attendees: (02:38 PM)
Good to hear from mike about affective learning. In this case, could you please focus what kind of technique is approprite for what, i.e. Didactic instruction, a low-complexity teaching technique such as a “Quiz Bowl”, or Jigsaw Method as high-complexity strategy, or both.

From Hailey W. to All panelists and other attendees: (02:36 PM)
As an ID librarian and the campus LMS administrator I struggle with getting them to see that other side of my role. That I’m not just “tech support”. Anyone else? Een jsut not being tech support?

From Vickie Kline to All panelists and other attendees: (02:44 PM)
As a librarian not formally trained in ID, I think a good entry point for exploring is Universal Design for Learning. We also need to pay attention to creating accessibility materials…

From Heather Quintero to All panelists and other attendees: (02:45 PM)
I always start with ADDIE… I am formally trained in ID and am an IT trainer for librarians. ADDIE is a framework for every class I make for both live and online classes. Don’t disregard ADDIE.

From Allison Rand to All panelists and other attendees: (02:47 PM)
The Wiggins and McTighe is a great book!

ADDIE Model

From Shane to All panelists and other attendees: (02:48 PM)
++SLIS open-source course on Instructional Design for Library Instruction

From Wendy to All panelists and other attendees: (02:49 PM)
Char Booth’s USER is also a very good model

http://www.modernlearning.com

https://web.mit.edu/jbelcher/www/TEALref/Crouch_Mazur.pdf

From Roberta (Robin) Sullivan to All panelists and other attendees: (02:53 PM)
@Rachel, Peggy, Shane – an open source course is available. Check out the SUNY’s Quality by Design (QbD): Strategies for Effective Teaching and Quality Course Design at: http://suny.edu/qbd This course is available as a facilitated version at least once each semester and as a self-paced non-facilitated version in Blackboard’s CourseSites. After completing the course requirements you can earn a Digital Badge to show your accomplishment.

From Naomi Toftness to All panelists and other attendees: (02:55 PM)
Just heard the terms “deliberate innovation” vs. “desperate innovation” that totally speaks to my situation with wanting to adopt the new cool tech

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BB screenshotSESSION LINK – https://sas.elluminate.com/d.jnlp?sid=2008350&password=LIB2019IDPart7 — If the session link doesn’t work for you, please copy and paste into your browser.

Session Title: Gamifying Instruction: Breakouts and Badges!

Your Name and Title: Dr. Brenda Boyer, Librarian & Instructor

Your Library, School, or Organization Name: Kutztown Sr. High School, Rutgers University

Your Twitter Handle (@name): @bsboyer

Name(s) of Co-Presenter(s): Brenda Boyer

Area of the World from Which You Will Present: Kutztown, PA

Language in Which You Will Present: English

Target Audience: Instructional Design Librarians

Short Session Description: Build engagement for your online library instruction using LMS features, Breakout boxes, and digital badges.

Session Strand (use the “tag”): {Session Strand (use the “tag”):}

Full Session Description: It’s time to amp up your library instruction! Gamifying instruction in research skills such as database usage, advanced searching, & more can increase engagement and drive independent learning for students of all ages. This session will describe how learning management system (LMS) features can be combined with digital microcredentials (i.e. badges) and breakout boxes to gamify instruction that can be otherwise deemed boring (for both the learners and the librarian!).

Link to Conference Site Session Proposal (full URL with http://): https://www.library20.com/forum/topics/gamifying-instruction-breakouts-and-badges

Other Websites / URLs Associated with Your Session:

Your Bio: Dr. Brenda Boyer is a librarian and instructional designer. She has developed online instruction for secondary learners in the Kutztown (PA) School District, as well as for graduate and professional development learners at Wilson College and Rutgers University. She designed and instructs the Rutgers graduate course, Learning Theory, Inquiry, & Instructional Design, and is a frequent presenter at AASL, Internet@Schools. She has published articles in School Library Journal, Teacher Librarian, and School Library Connection.

Email: boyer.brenda@gmail.com

notes from Brenda’s session:

are we getting the job done, is our instruction sticking, what evidence we do have?

differentiate: who is ready to do what” at what skill level? how to bring everybody up to speed?

3 elements of Digital Gamification: leverage LMS (set game levels); how digital badges are paired 3. using digital breakout boxes to push challenge, skills

each chat as prerequisite for the next. prerequisite in LMS. Each game level is module. completed with a quizz. if they pass the quiz, opens challenge.1. what is page (facts about a tool to learn about[ what the tool does, feature, etc.) 2. suppe rshort video tour (3 min max), talk about something unique 3. quick quiz (max 5 q/s from the intro page and video). pass the quiz (100 %) to unlock the challenge level. 4. challenge level. digital breakout box embedded in the LMS. breakout using Google Forms. various locks (words, letter, numbers)

Badges why?

Badgr, Credly, iDoceo

Breakout Boxes

 

 

++++++++++++++++++++++
SESSION LINK – https://sas.elluminate.com/d.jnlp?sid=2008350&password=LIB2019IDPart8 — If the session link doesn’t work for you, please copy and paste into your browser.

Session Title: Improving Library Tutorials: The Multimedia Design Principles

Your Name and Title: Darlene Aguilar, Instructional Design Librarian

Your Library, School, or Organization Name: Loyola Marymount University

Your Twitter Handle (@name): @DarleneA_ID

Name(s) of Co-Presenter(s):

Area of the World from Which You Will Present: Los Angeles, CA

Language in Which You Will Present: English

Target Audience: Reference and Instruction Librarians, Instructional Designers, Tutorial developers, Academic Librarians

Short Session Description: This session will review Mayer’s (2001) Multimedia Design Principles to help improve instructional modules, tutorials, and videos.

Session Strand (use the “tag”): {Session Strand (use the “tag”):}

Full Session Description: Librarians are creating more online modules, videos, and tutorials to teach information literacy skills. Whether designing instruction online or in-person, research-based instructional methods are required and learning Mayer’s Multimedia Design Principles is the best place to start. In this session, I will review essential prior-knowledge on image types and working memory. I will then show learners how to minimize cognitive overload using these 12 principles: multimedia, spatial contiguity, temporal contiguity, coherence, modality, redundancy, individual differences, signaling, pacing, concepts first, personalization, and human voice.

Link to Conference Site Session Proposal (full URL with http://): https://www.library20.com/forum/topics/improving-library-tutorials-the-multimedia-design-principles

Other Websites / URLs Associated with Your Session: https://linkedin.com/in/darlene-aguilar/

Your Bio: Darlene Aguilar is an Instructional Design Librarian at Loyola Marymount University where she designs and develops video tutorials and online modules on information literacy and library related topics. Additionally, she provides “best practices” training in instructional design to other LMU librarians. She graduated from the University of Southern California with a Master’s in Education for Learning Design and Technology and previously worked at LAUSD for 7 years. She strives to remove learning barriers that are embedded in instruction and curriculum and make learning accessible to all learners.

Email: darlene.aguilar@lmu.edu

notes from Darlene Aguilar session: spacial contiguity, temporal contiguity. Modality: animation + narration better then animation + text, redundancy: animation and narration then animation + narration + text

boolean operators

 

 

instructional design books

MnState OER webinar

Open Textbook Webinar — a 90-minute online meeting to learn about open textbooks.

Peer review of open textbooks is a critical component of assessing quality and supporting faculty looking for resources to use in their own classes.  After the workshop, you’ll be eligible to earn a $200 stipend if you provide a short review of an open textbook from the OpenTextbook Library.  Reviews are due 6-8 weeks following the workshop.

To prepare for the webinar, please take a few minutes and visit the Open Textbook Library (http://open.umn.edu/opentextbooks/). Glance through the Open Textbook Library and look for textbooks in your discipline that may be appropriate for you to review.  In order to receive the $200 stipend, you must 1) participate in the webinar and 2) complete a textbook review.  (Please note: There may not be texts available for review in your areas of expertise.)

When:   Wednesday, November 14, 2018; 2:30 pm – 4:00 pm

Note that additional Open Textbook Webinars are scheduled throughout the academic year.  Please contact Karen Pikula, OER Faculty Development Coordinator, at Karen.Pikula@minnstate.edu if you cannot attend the meeting on Monday. 

How:     Join the webinar through Adobe Connect

My notes:

open.umn.edu

3 models of creating textbooks: 1. write a book on their own 2. commercial model 3. Funder

Creative Common and copyright.

creative commons licenses

CC licenses free to: copy, share, edit, mix, keep, use

reviewing a textbook in the OER. Edit a book in OER

Preparing Learners for 21st Century Digital Citizenship

ID2ID webinar (my notes on the bottom)

Digital Fluency: Preparing Learners for 21st Century Digital Citizenship
Eighty-five percent of the jobs available in 2030 do not yet exist.  How does higher education prepare our learners for careers that don’t yet exist?  One opportunity is to provide our students with opportunities to grow their skills in creative problem solving, critical thinking, resiliency, novel thinking, social intelligence, and excellent communication skills.  Instructional designers and faculty can leverage the framework of digital fluency to create opportunities for learners to practice and hone the skills that will prepare them to be 21st-century digital citizens.  In this session, join a discussion about several fluencies that comprise the overarching framework for digital fluency and help to define some of your own.

Please click this URL to join. https://arizona.zoom.us/j/222969448

Dr. Jennifer Sparrow, Senior Director for Teaching and Learning with Technology and Affiliate Assistant Professor of Learning, Design, and Technology at Penn State.    The webinar will take place on Friday, November 9th at 11am EST/4pm UTC (login details below)  

https://arizona.hosted.panopto.com/Panopto/Pages/Viewer.aspx?id=e15266ee-7368-4378-b63c-a99301274877

My notes:

Jennifer does NOT see phone use for learning as an usage to obstruct. Similarly as with the calculator some 30-40 years ago, it was frowned upon, so now is technology. To this notion, added the fast-changing job market: new jobs created, old disappearing (https://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news/students-are-being-prepared-jobs-no-longer-exist-here-s-n865096)

how DF is different from DLiteracy? enable students define how new knowledge can be created through technology. Not only read and write, but create poems, stories, if analogous w learning a language. slide 4 in https://www.slideshare.net/aidemoreto/vr-library

communication fluency. be able to choose the correct media. curiosity/failure fluency; creation fluency (makerspace: create without soldering, programming, 3Dprinting. PLA filament-corn-based plastic; Makers-in-residence)

immersive fluency: video 360, VR and AR. enable student to create new knowledge through environments beyond reality. Immersive Experiences Lab (IMEX). Design: physical vs virtual spaces.

Data fluency: b.book. how to create my own textbook

rubrics and sample projects to assess digital fluency.

https://er.educause.edu/articles/2018/3/digital-fluency-preparing-students-to-create-big-bold-problems

https://events.educause.edu/annual-conference/2018/agenda/ethics-and-digital-fluency-in-vr-and-immersive-learning-environments

Literacy Is NOT Enough: 21st Century Fluencies for the Digital Age (The 21st Century Fluency Series)
https://www.amazon.com/Literacy-NOT-Enough-Century-Fluencies/dp/1412987806

What is Instructional Design 2.0 or 3.0? deep knowledge and understanding of faculty development. second, once faculty understands the new technology, how does this translate into rework of curriculum? third, the research piece; how to improve to be ready for the next cycle. a partnership between ID and faculty.

multi-user reference support experiences

https://www.emeraldinsight.com/eprint/AU2Q4SJGYQG5YTQ5A9RU/full

Hahn, J. (2018). Virtual reality learning environments | Development of multi-user reference support experiences | Information and Learning Science | Ahead of Print. EmeraldInsight. Retrieved from https://www.emeraldinsight.com/eprint/AU2Q4SJGYQG5YTQ5A9RU/full
case study: an undergraduate senior projects computer science course collaboration whose aim was to develop textual browsing experiences, among other library reference functionality, within the HTC Vive virtual reality (VR) headset. In this case study, readers are introduced to applied uses of VR in service to library-based learning through the research and development of a VR reading room app with multi-user support. Within the VR reading room prototype, users are able to collaboratively explore the digital collections of HathiTrust, highlight text for further searching and discovery and receive consultative research support from a reference specialist through VR.
Library staff met with the project team weekly over the 16 weeks of both semesters to first scope out the functionality of the system and vet requirements.
The library research team further hypothesized that incorporating reference-like support in the VR environment can support library learning. There is ample evidence in the library literature which underscores the importance of reference interactions as learning and instructional experiences for university students
Educational benefits to immersive worlds include offering a deeper presence in engagement with rare or non-accessible artifacts. Sequeira and Morgado (2013, p. 2) describe their Virtual Archeology project as using “a blend of techniques and methods employed by historians and archaeologists using computer models for visualizing cultural artefacts and heritage sites”.
The higher-end graphics cards include devices such as the NVIDIA GeForceTM GTX 1060 or AMD RadeonTM RX 480, equivalent or better. The desktop system that was built for this project used the GeForce GTX 1070, which was slightly above the required minimum specifications.

Collaboration: Library as client.

Specific to this course collaboration, computer science students in their final year of study are given the option of several client projects on which to work. The Undergraduate Library has been a collaborator with senior computer science course projects for several years, beginning in 2012-2013 with mobile application design and chat reference software re-engineering (Hahn, 2015). (My note: Mark Gill, this is where and how Mehdi Mekni, you and I can collaborate)

The hurdles the students had the most trouble with was code integration – e.g. combining various individual software parts towards the end of the semester. The students also were challenged by the public HathiTrust APIs, as the system was developed to call the HathiTrust APIs from within the Unity programming environment and developing API calls in C#. This was a novel use of the HathiTrust search APIs for the students and a new area for the research team as well.

There are alternatives to Unity C# programming, notably WebVR, an open source specification for VR programming on the open web.

A-Frame has seen maturation as a platform agnostic and device agnostic software programming environment. The WebVR webpage notes that the specification supports HTC Vive, Oculus Rift, Samsung Gear VR, Google Daydream and Google Cardboard (WebVR Rocks, 2018). Open web platforms are consistent with library values and educational goals of sharing work that can be foundational in implementing VR learning experience both in VR environments and shareable on the web, too.

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more on VR in libraries in this IMS blog
https://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=virtual+reality+library

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