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5 Tips for eLearning Voice Recording

5 Tips for eLearning Voice Recording

http://elearningindustry.com/5-tips-for-elearning-voice-recording

These are the top 5 frequent e-Learning voice recording situations that I’ve come across:

  1. A.C.R.O.N.Y.M.S.
    Is this pronounced A-C-R-O-N-Y-M-S or ‘acronyms’? Is it read as letters or read as a word? A lot of scripts do have acronyms related to company or industry jargon. Define this in the script to avoid confusion and save re-records! You can use ALL CAPS but that may not be enough. Periods or dashes between letters (A-C-R-O-N-Y-M-S) generally indicate the word to be read as individual letters. But to be safe, put explanation notes in the margin or at the top of the script defining correct pronunciation, to reduce risk.
  2. Audio file – technical specifications
    If you hire a voice talent to record for you, usually you ask for either mp3 or wav audio files back from her. But are you also specifying the bit rate? 16 bit resolution is the gold standard. If you get 24 bit, your audio may sound garbled but only after it’s embedded into your program. Save time and trouble upfront by stating your audio tech specs!
  3. Attitude or Point Of View
    What kind of attitude do you want to hear in the voice recording? Think about the end listener. What will peak their interest and attentiveness more? By taking the small amount of time to define the “who is talking” and “to whom”, you can help the person recording to provide a POV (point of view) with the right attitude. Plus, it’s a great way to provide impact and underscore the project for the client. This is a gem – often unused! For example, is this a co-worker talking to her peers or (differently) is she showing a new person the ropes? Is this an SME (subject matter expert) sharing expert information? To whom – Top management or research engineers? If your project is required information, like an annual safety review or similar, it can often be very dry material. Taking a couple minutes to think about the role of who delivers such information can energize dry material. Some more general examples of attitude can be: Strong and Authoritative. Caring and Conversational. Casual like a co-worker. Blue collar vs white collar.
  4. Proximity
    Another gem of a different color! A voice recording can be done further or closer to the microphone. We call that ‘proximity’. This can change or impact the way a listener responds. Compare whispering vs talking at a cubicle vs presenting to a room of people. Changing ‘proximity’ can create poignant moments that listeners will notice. Let your clients know about this technique as well. Used sparingly = high impact!
  5. Script Writing flow – or Writing with listening in mind
    After all the information is written, review the script for a flow of words that, when read aloud, are easy to comprehend and will engage the listener. This may be hard to find time for, depending on your client’s budget – but it is one of those quality elements that can win you a client’s loyalty. When I see a line or two in a script that I think can be phrased to flow more conversationally, I might offer it as an alternate.

apps for student engagement

https://www.facebook.com/groups/onlinelearningcollective/permalink/680939699203398/

Looking for different ways for students to share their knowledge. I’ve done Jamboard, Google Slides, Discussion posts, padlet…I just want something different and am not able to come up with any great ideas here. Anyone come up with anything else fun or interesting? This is for an asynchronous course.

Jamboard, https://edu.google.com/products/jamboard/

Google Slides jambor

Padlet  https://padlet.com/

Flipgrid

Canva

Adobe Spark

TikTok

https://dotstorming.com/

Mural.co https://www.mural.co/

Miro https://miro.com/

Sketchnotes https://www.jetpens.com/blog/sketchnotes-a-guide-to-visual-note-taking/pt/892

Pear Deck https://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=pear+deck

Near Pod https://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=nearpod

EdPuzzle https://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2017/11/01/digital-assessment-session/

 

synchronous vs asynchronous

https://www.facebook.com/groups/onlinelearningcollective/permalink/663427347621300/

Anyone being coerced by admin to do synchronous classes instead of asynchronous? I’m zoomed out.

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more on synch vs asynch in this IMS blog
https://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=synchronous+vs+asynchronous

synchronous vs asynchronous attitudes

https://www.facebook.com/groups/onlinelearningcollective/permalink/654845191812849/

Discussion in my faculty meeting this morning: academic advisor shared that even though students previously said they wanted synchronous courses (because they were more like f2f courses) they now are dropping synchronous in favor of asynchronous. I find this hard to believe. Is anyone actually experiencing this?

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more on synchronous discussions in this IMS blog
https://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=synchronous

more on asynchronous discussions in this IMS blog:
https://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=asynchronous

virtual whiteboards

https://www.facebook.com/groups/onlinelearningcollective/permalink/645518319412203/

https://ziteboard.com

https://idroo.com/

https://edu.google.com/products/jamboard/?modal_active=none

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more on white boards in this IMS blog
https://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=white+board

embedded librarianship overview literature

Abrizah, A., Inuwa, S., & Afiqah-Izzati, N. (2016). Systematic Literature Review Informing LIS Professionals on Embedding Librarianship Roles. Journal of Academic Librarianship, 42(6), 636–643. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.acalib.2016.08.010
https://www.mendeley.com/catalogue/api/fulltext-resolver/66b9b868-c505-32a9-b50f-c3fc51321c3f/?doi=10.1016/j.acalib.2016.08.010
identifies and documents embedding librarianship roles as reported in the Library and Information Science (LIS) literature.
Findings The roles of embedded librarians were identified, especially in the context of service delivery, all of which reported to be applied to academic libraries. Information literacy instruction, research and other scholarly activities, distance and online learning as well as embedding in classrooms, were described as ways of ensuring successful embedding librarianship. Implications The roles reported in the literature should inform practicing librarians contemplating embedding practices, guide formal embedded librarianship programs, and encourage other librarians to consider new skills in support of embedding roles.
p. 637 The idea behind EL model is to demonstrate librarians’ expertise asinformation specialists and to apply this expertise in ways that willhave a direct and deep impact on the research, teaching or otherworks being done (Carlson & Kneale, 2011).Carlson and Kneale(2011)pointed out that as librarians seek to redefine themselves, themodel of EL is generating interest as an effectual way of applying theknowledge and skills of librarians towards the information challengesof the digital age.
Faculty collaboration with the embedded librarian is the core of em-bedded information literacy instruction. Faculty-librarian relationshipbuilding is of great significance because the two must work closely to-gether over an extended period of time, it is essential that librarianschoose their partnership carefully. Several librarians stress the need towork only in partnerships where there is trust and mutual respect(Carncross, 2013). Librarians build these relationships in differentways, while collaborative relationship can be built in numerous ways,it is essential that bothparties have common goals and know the impor-tance of developing information literacy skills in their students. The most significant collaboration are from campuses in which librarian and university administrators have made information literacy a priority on campus, and have provided librarians and faculty with the time re-quired to make the collaboration successful (Cramer, 2013).
The embedded librarian is focused on course goals and learning objectives outside of the library and across the curriculum
The review designates that EL in courses, classrooms and depart-ments see librarians conducting the following specific tasks: teach stu-dents how to be savvy searchers using computer and laptops (Boyer,2015); collaborate where librarian and faculty member teach eachother, exchanging favors, and the librarian selecting useful resourcesfor the faculty (Ivey, 2003); take part in meetings to promote librarian’spresence and establish communication with the students, researchersand faculty (Jacobs, 2010); provide access to course-related library re-sources, in-class instruction sessions, library instructional handouts, in-formation on referencing style, library Webinar information as well asteach note-taking (Bezet, 2013).
The review shows that academic libraries that engage their distancelearning communities through an embedded librarian as online co-instructors to deliver technological applications such as instant messag-ing, e-mail, and wikis. This EL model facilitates direct interaction be-tween students and librarians regardless of physical proximity.Edwards and Black (2012)andEdwards et al. (2010)evaluated the pro-gram of embedded librarians in an online graduate educational technol-ogy course and found that students were helped with their onlineassignments.

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more on embedded librarianship in this IMS blog
https://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=embedded

PodCourse

About

https://www.facebook.com/groups/onlinelearningcollective/permalink/635190050445030/

For those looking for ways to set podcast assignments : we developed a toolbox to guide students to plan, record and edit a 10-15min episode last year (little did I know I’d be rolling it out in a remote course, but it worked… mostly). Material, prompts and some thoughts on assessment now available on our website :https://blogs.helsinki.fi/podcourse/. Feel free to use it… and let me know how you get on 😉.

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more on podcast in this IMS blog
https://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=podcast

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