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UDL Universal Design for Learning

https://www.facebook.com/groups/onlinelearningcollective/permalink/631309057499796/

Dos and don’ts on designing for accessibility

Universal Design for Learning (UDL)

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more on UDL in this IMS blog
https://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=udl

Shield vs Mask

What is better: face shield or face mask?

faculty discussion on the issue can be found here:
https://www.facebook.com/groups/onlinelearningcollective/permalink/621278065169562/
If you don’t have FB account and/or more info needed, please contact us.

Here more information:

‘Only those with plastic visors were infected’: Swiss government warns against face shields

July 15, 2020
https://www.thelocal.ch/20200715/only-those-with-plastic-visors-were-infected-swiss-government-warns-against-face-shields

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Face Mask vs Face Shield: Which Is More Effective Against Coronavirus?

https://www.ibtimes.com/face-mask-vs-face-shield-which-more-effective-against-coronavirus-3013922

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Is a Face Shield Better Protection Against the Coronavirus Than a Face Mask?

May 28, 2020

https://www.health.com/condition/infectious-diseases/coronavirus/face-shield-coronavirus

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June 29, 2020

ADDIE and SAM models

https://www.facebook.com/groups/onlinelearningcollective/permalink/603803423583693/

Corinne Hyde

Anyone in here teach instructional design that can recommend a textbook that teaches ADDIE or SAM but is inclusive and has an emphasis on instruction being culturally responsive or culturally sustaining?

Glenn Singley

https://community.articulate.com/articles/an-introduction-to-sam-for-instructional-designers

The ADDIE model of instructional design is probably the most well-known approach for crafting learning solutions. ADDIE stands for Analyze, Design, Development, Implement, and Evaluate. But ADDIE isn’t the only game in town these days. One popular alternative to ADDIE is SAM, which stands for Successive Approximation Model.

Created by Allen Interactions, SAM offers an instructional design approach consisting of repeated small steps, or iterations, that are intended to address some of the most common instructional design pain points, like meeting timelines, staying on budget, and collaborating with Subject Matter Experts

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more on ADDIE in this IMS blog
https://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=addie+model

https://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=SAMR

ice breakers for online classes

https://www.facebook.com/groups/onlinelearningcollective/permalink/598838524080183/

Janine Harrison You could also substitute an ice breaker with an introduction that could be both personal and relate to your subject and require a minimum of two participation posts. If students don’t know one another, they can find commonalities that way.

Jorge Ribeiro I ask them to tell us their superpower(s) & kryptonite noting that they can be anything. Superpowers have been: baking bread, doing push-ups daily, Crystal Quest, etc. Kryptonite: math, writing an essay, spinach

SJ Guo online scavenger hunt

Ed Heaberlin Ask them to discuss
1). The movie they were most disappointed by
2) the movie that they most often recommend
3) their favorite food
4) a food they hate
5) their most embarrassing moment
6) their dream vacation
7) if they could throw a dinner with any five famous people (living, dead, or both)who would it be n why

Diana Anson Using the Discussion Board I have each student introduce themselves to the class. I make the first post introducing myself. I usually include a picture of my dogs. This gives everyone a example of what is expected. Many really good ideas for questions are included already posted here. I also assign points for following the instructions. Points are a great motivation .

Traci Schneider Cull Favorite cartoon.. what superhero power would you have and why? If you could only eat 5 foods forever what would they be… would you rather go without technology for a yr or all sweets and desserts for a year…would you give up your tech for a year or your pet

Britt Rodgers Bugby Have them choose an emoji to represent themselves and explain why…and it can’t be 💩

Sharon Kibbe You can have them select a song that they would “enter a room/party to” and have them play it at the start of their introduction

 

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more on ice breakers in this IMS blog
https://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=ice+breaker

bio lab in emergency teaching

https://www.facebook.com/groups/onlinelearningcollective/permalink/599387467358622/

Hi everyone- my mom has been teaching Bio 101 with a lab for 39 years. I’m working with her to get ready for the fall semester online but Science isn’t my field. Any recommendations for online bio labs?

Stephanie Edelmann I’m still working on my lab, but here is an extensive list of online resources that was shared with faculty at our school.

https://docs.google.com/…/1Mv0EyCw2QeFIpW5P5qNR5EW…/edit

Rebecca Westphal Carolina has kits…. but they are mostly on back order and hard to get for fall (in US?). You could think of putting together your own kits for students to pick up. There are also many labs using “household” materials such as this spinach photosynthesis lab http://www2.nau.edu/…/photosynthesis/photosynthesis.html.

For introducing basic chemistry I really like the “Build an Atom” simulation on the PhET website, although it’s more of an activity than a “lab”. HHMI biointeractive has lots of free resources and data sets that you could build on, including lots for natural selection — try searching “rock pocket mouse natural selection” on the biointeractive website.

Rachel Scherer https://phet.colorado.edu/_m/ is one of my go to favorites. I have some instructors testing labster out this summer. I haven’t heard anything back so I am guessing it is working well for them. Also

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/18iVSIeOqKjj58xcR8dYJS5rYvzZ4X1UGLWhl3brRzCM/htmlview?fbclid=IwAR2h4vyLqHtXW6M80CXTHZ4eUrv-TY8ljCMMZ52zMRGCqqgxwNt6Qq8zpF0#gid=0

Cheryl DeWyer Lindeman https://www.biointeractive.org

Cheryl DeWyer Lindeman https://www.shapeoflife.org/

Sondra LoRe https://qubeshub.org/community/groups/quant_bio_online

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more on emergency teaching in this IMS blog
https://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=emergency+teaching

administrative mandate of online discussions

https://www.facebook.com/groups/onlinelearningcollective/permalink/591411374822898/

Hi colleagues, My provost just put out a set of expected guidelines for instructors in online classes that emphasize expectations around discussion forums (I pasted them below). These discussion forum expectations are very narrowly defined. I am needing group-think on references that might help me put together some “best practice” alternatives. If an article or other resource comes to mind, please share!
Online Faculty Expectations
Weekly Required (all weeks)
• Faculty will demonstrate their presence in the class 5 days per week
• Respond to all students’ (who post on-time) primary discussion post if you have 9 or fewer students (1/2 of students if you have 10 or more).
• Faculty with larger courses should take special care to post to different students each week.
• Faculty who provide a weekly zoom lecture need only post on the board two other times (on two different days for a total of two other posts).
• Provide individual feedback (posted in the feedback section of the gradebook) for all discussion grades within a reasonable timeframe for students to complete subsequent assignments.
responses:
Kip Boahn top-down policy?..
Dayna Henry I balk at the admin trying to tell us what to do. At the same time, I am very angry with colleagues who did not actually offer anything in the way of virtual learning when we went online in spring. It’s hard to balance academic freedom with faculty who don’t care to learn/offer a new way of learning (for your institution). I also recognize the admin was not in their F2F courses either and likely the slacking was occurring there too. The problem is the students LOVE these folks for giving them an easy A/pass.
Cathy Curran For years I have said that administrators need to teach at least one each year or every other year. My Dean has been out of the classroom for over 20 years, the Provost for over 25 and the Chancellor has never taught. They have zero clue how to build or implement and online class. They keep making mandates that to those of us who do actually teach seem absurd. We know the “count and classify” nonsense never works but it is the same argument they use for numerical evaluations of teaching effectiveness: it is objective. The decisions they are making do not make instruction better they are all about power and control, they need us to “prove” that we are doing our job and somehow logging into the LMS five days a week does that. Sad really really sad. Well you know some do and other become administrators…

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more on online discussions in this IMS blog
https://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=online+discussions

virtual exhibitions online classes

a tool that will allow students to collaboratively create an “exhibit” at the end of an online class.

https://www.facebook.com/groups/onlinelearningcollective/permalink/579247622705940/

I’m looking for a tool that will allow students to collaboratively create an “exhibit” at the end of an online class. Each student will be responsible for curating a selection of objects (art, photographs, music clips, and text quotes) with short explanations that we’ll put together in an exhibit on our class topic. I’ve thought of various formats—including possibly TimelineJS (I’m a historian)—but I wanted to see if anyone else had experience with this kind of assignment and recommendations of tools. My students have different levels of technology access and literacy, so my priority is simplicity and ease of use. Thank you very much for any suggestions you might have!

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more on virtual tours in this IMS blog
https://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=virtual+tour

synchronous online instruction resources

SYNCHRONOUS ONLINE INSTRUCTION RESOURCES

https://www.facebook.com/groups/onlinelearningcollective/permalink/577177872912915/

open google doc to start crowd-sourcing tools/activities/strategies for interactive synchronous online instruction

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1NL5jESubV_kuxrg227LFRdIGOBpwgJvAQkcnYuGpmGA/edit?fbclid=IwAR0Kx7m75wHiKKMai18cAz8gdqaNK3J9wzsIliMDsTrKVVcX7ej6bSTJO4E

different kind of teaching this fall

https://www.facebook.com/groups/onlinelearningcollective/permalink/576092676354768/

Are Colleges Ready for a Different Kind of Teaching This Fall?

By Beth McMurtrie May 05, 2020

https://www.chronicle.com/article/Are-Colleges-Ready-for-a/248710

Skeptical students and their parents don’t seem willing to pay full price for an experience similar to what they lived through this semester. If virtual learning is mandatory this fall, one survey found, two-thirds of students will expect discounts on tuition and fees. Some may avoid enrolling altogether.

Education experts who have been following higher education’s transition to remote learning say that colleges need to act now if they want to be fully prepared for the fall.

Colleges should start by evaluating what went well, and poorly, this spring, so they can start identifying gaps in training, planning, and technology, he says. They should also assess their campus resources to begin preparing instructors for the fall. They may find that instructional designers, academic-technology experts, and faculty members familiar with online tools and teaching are less effective because they are spread thinly across campus, not centrally deployed.

Effective online teaching, Wade says, depends more on building engagement than on mastering complicated technology.

At the University of Central Florida, Thomas B. Cavanagh, vice provost for digital learning, estimates that more than 80 percent of its 1,600 faculty members had received some form of professional development for teaching online before the coronavirus hit, ranging from self-paced training on how to use the learning-management system to the university’s 10-week online-course-design program. Given the need to rapidly prepare hundreds of instructors, says Cavanagh, the university is in the process of developing a streamlined three-week course, “essentials of online teaching,” through which it expects to train around 200 instructors. About 350 instructors will also take a short course called “teaching through lecture capture — Zoom edition,” he says.

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