Searching for "game-based learning"

International Journal of Game-Based Learning

International Journal of Game-Based Learning (IJGBL)

Editor-in-Chief: Patrick Felicia (Waterford Institute of Technology, Ireland)
Published Quarterly. Est. 2011.
ISSN: 2155-6849|EISSN: 2155-6857|DOI: 10.4018/IJGBL

Description

The International Journal of Game-Based Learning (IJGBL) is devoted to the theoretical and empirical understanding of game-based learning. To achieve this aim, the journal publishes theoretical manuscripts, empirical studies, and literature reviews. The journal publishes this multidisciplinary research from fields that explore the cognitive and psychological aspects that underpin successful educational video games. The target audience of the journal is composed of professionals and researchers working in the fields of educational games development, e-learning, technology-enhanced education, multimedia, educational psychology, and information technology. IJGBL promotes an in-depth understanding of the multiple factors and challenges inherent to the design and integration of Game-Based Learning environments.

Topics Covered

  • Adaptive games design for Game-Based Learning
  • Design of educational games for people with disabilities
  • Educational video games and learning management systems
  • Game design models and design patterns for Game-Based Learning
  • Instructional design for Game-Based Learning
  • Integration and deployment of video games in the classroom
  • Intelligent tutoring systems and Game-Based Learning
  • Learning by designing and developing video games
  • Learning styles, behaviors and personalities in educational video games
  • Mobile development and augmented reality for Game-Based Learning
  • Motivation, audio and emotions in educational video games
  • Role of instructors
  • Virtual worlds and Game-Based Learning

Mission

The mission of the International Journal of Game-Based Learning (IJGBL) is to promote knowledge pertinent to the design of Game-Based Learning environments, and to provide relevant theoretical frameworks and the latest empirical research findings in the field of Game-Based Learning. The main goals of IJGBL are to identify, explain, and improve the interaction between learning outcomes and motivation in video games, and to promote best practices for the integration of video games in instructional settings. The journal is multidisciplinary and addresses cognitive, psychological and emotional aspects of Game-Based Learning. It discusses innovative and cost-effective Game-Based Learning solutions. It also provides students, researchers, instructors, and policymakers with valuable information in Game-Based Learning, and increases their understanding of the process of designing, developing and deploying successful educational games. IJGBL also identifies future directions in this new educational medium.

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more on gaming and gamification in this IMS blog:
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=gaming+and+gamification

Game-Based Learning GBL

GAME-BASED LEARNING AND GAME CONSTRUCTION AS AN E-LEARNING STRATEGY INPROGRAMMING EDUCATION

Marie Olsson and Peter Mozeliu
authors have been subject matter experts and content developers as well as teachers and facilitators.

A clear trend at universities in the 21st century has been the transformation of traditional face-to-face rostrum teaching to blended learning or pure distance education in virtual learning environments (Graham, 2006; Lim & Morris, 2009; Park & Choi, 2009).

GAME-BASED LEARNING AND GAME CONSTRUCTION AS AN E- LEARNING STRATEGY IN PROGRAMMING EDUCATION. Available from: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/304490353_GAME-BASED_LEARNING_AND_GAME_CONSTRUCTION_AS_AN_E-_LEARNING_STRATEGY_IN_PROGRAMMING_EDUCATION [accessed Jun 28, 2016].

more on GBL in this blog:

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=game-based+learning

Online Game-based Learning in Art History and Museum Contexts

The Games Art Historians Play: Online Game-based Learning in Art History and Museum Contexts

http://chronicle.com/blogs/profhacker/the-games-art-historians-play-online-game-based-learning-in-art-history-and-museum-contexts

game-based learning differs from gamification in several important ways. Sometimes the latter is reduced to bells and whistles such as gold stars and progress bars, but gamification is potentially a much more subtle and powerful teaching strategy.

lizabeth Goins (Rochester Institute of Technology) describes several recent projects including a 3D game based on Hieronymous Bosch’s Garden of Earthly Delights in her blog, and details as well assignments in which the students create games. Keri Watson (University of Central Florida), teaches with both a RPG (role-playing game) and an ARG (alternative reality game). The RPG is Gretchen Kreahling McKay’s “Modernism versus Traditionalism: Art in Paris, 1888-89,” a Reacting to the Past (see earlier PH coverage) game, targeted for use in first year seminars at small liberal arts colleges. She taught with the game several times while at Ithaca College and reflects on her experience here. Watson’s ARG, “Secret Societies of the Avant-garde,” was createdwith a colleague in digital media as a Unity-based game, and is still in development. (Anastasia Salter wrote about this game in February.) Their prototype was deployed this past spring in an upper level modern art course, the game poses for the students a series of the challenges to research and create online exhibitions. (Those interested in developing an ARG might also want to peruse this interesting recent piece from TechCrunch on historical accuracy in games.)

game-based learning

The underlying assumption of an education system that relies so heavily on test-based assessment is that content is what matters.
For those who prioritize learning that can be measured using only quantitative assessments, game-based learning probably just looks like a way to increase student engagement and content retention. It might seem like a complex workbook, or an entertaining quiz. Perhaps game-based learning looks like a great tool for practice and drilling, like a super sophisticated flash-card system that makes memorization more fun. But this kind of thinking doesn’t take into account the broader understanding of what matters. Game-based learning is a great classroom tool because it allows for interdisciplinary learning through contextualized critical thinking and problem solving.
Games in the classroom can encourage students to understand subject matter in context — as part of a system. In contrast to memorization, drilling, and quizzing, which is often criticized because it focuses on facts in isolation, games force players to interact with problems in ways that take relationships into account. The content becomes useful insofar as it plays a part in a larger multi-modal system.

Definition
Game-based learning is an instructional method that allows students to experience, understand, and solve problems in the world of a particular subject, or system, from the inside.

One promise of game-based learning is that it has the potential of building comprehension and literacy rather than retention. It does this by combining instruction, practice, and assessment. Teachers become the facilitators of a process where instruction is experiential. Practice is project based, requiring students to solve new problems and address new challenges using the new ideas to which they’ve been introduced. And assessment no longer measures a student’s ability to regurgitate information, or to choose among multiple answers, but rather, to use the content, or subject matter, in context. Even more impressive is that in order to successfully manipulate one piece within a comprehensive and complex system, the students must understand every piece of the system.
http://blogs.kqed.org/mindshift/tag/games/

 

change in learning

Bonk, C. J. (2016). What is the state of e-learning?: Reflections on 30 ways learning is changing. Journal of Open, Flexible and Distance Learning, 20(2), 6-20. Journal of Open, Flexible and Distance Learning. Retrieved from https://www.academia.edu/30032706/Bonk_C._J._2016_._What_is_the_state_of_e-learning_Reflections_on_30_ways_learning_is_changing._Journal_of_Open_Flexible_and_Distance_Learning_20_2_6-20
Mega trend 1 Learner engagement
new opportunities for fostering greater learner involvement and concerted effort in the learning process
Change #1: Learning is more mobile
Change #2: Learning is more visual
Change #3: Learning is more touch-sensored
Change #4: Learning is more game-based
Change #5: Learning is more immersive
Change #6: Learning is more collaborative
Change #7: Learning is more social
Change #8: Learning is more digital and resource-rich
Change #9: Learning is more adventurous
Change #10: Learning is more hands-on
Mega Trend 2 Pervasive access
our ability to increasingly access learning anyway and anytime.

Change #11: Learning is more online
Change #12: Learning is more video-based
Change #13: Learning is more global
Change #14: Learning is more immediate
Change #15: Learning is more direct from experts
Change #16: Learning is more synchronous
Change #17: Learning is more open
Change #18: Learning is more free
Change #19: Learning is more informal
Change #20: Learning is ubiquitous
Mega Trend #3: Customisation
Change #21: Learning is more blended
Change #22: Learning is more self-directed
Change #23: Learning is more competency-based
Change #24: Learning is more on demand
Change #25: Learning is more massive
Change #26: Learning is more modular
Change #27: Learning is more communal
Change #28: Learning is more modifiable
Change #29: Learning is more flipped
Change #30: Learning is more personal

elearning market in decline

Global E-Learning Market in Steep Decline, Report Says

By Richard Chang

https://campustechnology.com/articles/2016/09/01/global-elearning-market-in-steep-decline.aspx

a recent report released by Ambient Insight Research, a Washington state-based market research firm.

Revenues for self-paced e-learning in 2016 are heavily concentrated in two countries — the United States and China. The growth rate in the U.S. is at -5.3 percent, representing a $4.9 billion drop in revenues by 2021, while in China, the rate is at -8.8 percent, representing a $1.9 billion drop by 2021. The e-learning market in China has deteriorated rapidly in just the last 18 months, the report said.

  • Of the 122 countries tracked by Ambient Insight, 15 have growth rates for self-paced e-learning over 15 percent during the next five years. These countries are heavily concentrated in Asia and Africa, with the two outliers being Slovakia and Lithuania.
  • Eleven of the top 15 growth countries will generate less than $20 million by 2021. Of the top 15, Slovakia and Lithuania are anticipated to generate the highest revenues for self-paced products by 2021, at $55.4 million and $36.5 million, respectively.
  • The growth rates are negative in every region except Africa, where the growth is flat at 0.9 percent. The steepest declines are in Asia and Latin America at -11.7 percent and -10.8 percent, respectively. The economic meltdowns in Brazil and Venezuela are major inhibitors in Latin America.
  • There are 77 countries with flat-to-negative growth rates. The countries with the lowest growth rates are Yemen (-18.7 percent), Brazil (-19.8 percent), Qatar (-23.5 percent) and Venezuela (-26.8 percent).

Self-paced e-learning products include online courses, managed education services, managed training, e-books and learning management systems, according to the report. The author does not consider mobile and game-based learning, which are growing, to be in the self-paced e-learning category.

The news on the self-paced e-learning industry is so bad, Ambient Insight will no longer publish commercial syndicated reports on the industry, the firm says on its website and in the report.

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more on elearning in this IMS blog

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=elearning

Digital Games + Learning

Guide to Digital Games + Learning

http://www.kqed.org/assets/pdf/news/MindShift-GuidetoDigitalGamesandLearning.pdf

http://blogs.kqed.org/mindshift/2014/11/the-mindshift-guide-to-digital-games-and-learning

ey ideas in game-based learning, pedagogy, implementation, and assessment. This guide makes sense of the available research and provides suggestions for practical use.

http://www.instituteofplay.org/

 

innovation online ed

Is innovation severely lacking in online education?

Laura Ascione, Managing Editor, Content Services, @eSN_Laura
July 6th, 2017
The emergence of the chief online officer position at many institutions is strong evidence that online education is becoming more mainstream
Revenue generation and tuition

most responding institutions have online program tuition rates that are aligned with standard tuition or that are higher. Those higher tuition rates ranged from 12 percent of private institutions to 29 percent of four-year public institutions, and lower than standard tuition rates ranged from 3 percent of community colleges to 37 percent of private institutions. None of the larger online programs reported tuition rates for online students that are lower than standard tuition rates, and 20 percent reported higher tuition rates for online study.

Course development

Forty percent of chief online officers in larger programs larger programs use instructional design support, and 30 percent use a team approach to online course design. Ten percent outsource course design.

This kind of course development is in stark contrast to practices of chief online officers in mid-sized and smaller programs. Among the smallest online education programs, 18 percent of chief online officers expect faculty to develop online courses independently, and 53 percent treat instructional design support as a faculty option. This means that a combined 71 percent of smaller programs do not mandate the use of instructional design specialists.

In 13 percent of mid-sized programs, faculty are expected to develop courses independently, and in 64 percent of mid-sized programs, they are free to choose whether or not to involve instructional design specialists, yielding a combined 77 percent of programs that do not require the use of instructional design expertise.

Teaching, learning and technology

The CHLOE survey also asked chief online officers to name three technologies or tools they consider most important or innovative for their institution’s fully-online programs. Eighty-one percent first listed an LMS, while others named audio and video conferencing and lecture capture. The technologies most-cited for second- and third-most important were conferencing, video and lecture capture software. (see Plamen’s effort to start faculty discussion on lecture capture here: http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/coursecapture/)

“There was no sign of much-hyped innovations like adaptive learning, competency-based education LMS solutions, or simulation or game-based learning tools,” according to the study. “Such tools may be in use for specific courses or programs but based on responses to CHLOE, these have yet to achieve institution-wide adoption at any scale.” (see Plamen’s efforts start a discussion on game-based learning here: https://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=game-based+learning

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more on online ed in this IMS blog:
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=online+education

asynch and LMS online

Asynch Delivery and the LMS Still Dominate for Online Programs

By Dian Schaffhauser  05/22/17

https://campustechnology.com/articles/2017/05/22/asynch-delivery-and-the-lms-still-dominate-for-online-programs.aspx

a recent research project  by Quality Matters and Eduventures, the “Changing Landscape of Online Education (CHLOE)” offers a “baseline” examination of program development, quality measures and other structural issues.

95 percent of larger programs (those with 2,500 or more online program students) are “wholly asynchronous” while 1.5 percent are mainly or completely synchronous. About three-quarters (73 percent) of mid-sized programs (schools with between 500 and 2,499 online program students) and 62 percent of smaller programs are fully asynchronous.

The asynchronous nature of this kind of education may explain why threaded discussions turned up as the most commonly named teaching and learning technique, mentioned by 27.4 percent of respondents, closely followed by practice-based learning, listed by 27.3 percent of survey participants.

Blackboard and Instructure Canvas dominated. Audio- and videoconferencing come in a “distant second,” according to the researchers. The primary brands that surfaced for those functions were Adobe Connect, Cisco WebEx, Zoom, Kaltura, Panopto, TechSmith Camtasia and Echo360.

While the LMS plays a significant role in online programming, the report pointed to a distinct lack of references to “much-hyped innovations,” such as adaptive learning, competency-based education systems, simulation or game-based learning tools. (my note: my mouth run dry of repeating every time people start becoming orgasmic about LMS, D2L in particular)

four in 10 require the use of instructional design support, three in 10 use a team approach for online course design and one in 10 outsources the work. Overall, some 80 percent of larger programs use instructional design expertise.

In the smallest programs, instructional design support is treated as a “faculty option” for 53 percent of institutions. Another 18 percent expect faculty to develop their online courses independently. For 13 percent of mid-sized programs, the faculty do their development work independently; another 64 percent may choose whether or not to bring in instructional design help. (my note: this is the SCSU ‘case’)

Measuring Quality

Among the many possible quality metrics suggested by the researchers, the five adopted most frequently for internal monitoring were:

  • Student achievement of program objectives (83 percent);
  • Student retention and graduation rates (77 percent);
  • Program reputation (48 percent);
  • Faculty training (47 percent); and
  • Student engagement measures (41 percent).

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http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=online+learning

IM554 discussion on GBL

IM554 discussion on Game Based Learning

Here is the “literature”:
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2015/03/19/recommendations-for-games-and-gaming-at-lrs/
this link reflects my recommendations to the SCSU library, based on my research and my publication: http://scsu.mn/1F008Re

Here are also Slideshare shows from conferences’ presentations on the topic:

https://www.slideshare.net/aidemoreto/gamification-and-byox-in-academic-libraries-low-end-practical-approach

https://www.slideshare.net/aidemoreto/gaming-and-gamification-in-academic-and-library-settings

Topic :Gaming and Gamification in Academic Settings

  1. Intro: why is it important to discuss this trend
    1. The fabric of the current K12 and higher ed students: Millennials and Gen Z
    2. The pedagogical theories and namely constructivism
      1. Csikszentmihalyi’s “flow” concept (being in the zone)
      2. Active learning
      3. Sociocultural Theory
      4. Project-Based Learning
    3. The general milieu of increasing technology presence, particularly of gaming environment
    4. The New Media Consortium and the Horizon Report

Discussion: Are the presented reasons sufficient to justify a profound restructure of curricula and learning spaces?

  1. Definition and delineation
    1. Games
    2. Serious Games
    3. Gamification
    4. Game-based learning
    5. Digital game-based learning
    6. Games versus gamification
    7. Simulations, the new technological trends such as human-computer interaction (HCI) such as augmented reality (AR),virtual reality (VR) and mixed reality (MR) (http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2017/02/22/virtual-augmented-mixed-reality/ )

Discussion: Is there a way to build a simpler but comprehensive structure/definition to encompass the process of gaming and gamification in education?

  1. Gaming and Gamification
    1. Pros
    2. Cons
    3. Debates

Discussion: Which side are you on and why?

  1. Gaming and Gamification and BYOD (or BYOx)
    1. gaming consoles versus gaming over wi-fi
    2. gaming using mobile devices instead of consoles
    3. human-computer interaction (HCI) such as augmented reality (AR),virtual reality (VR) and mixed reality (MR) (http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2017/02/22/virtual-augmented-mixed-reality/ )

Discussion: do you see a trend to suggest that either one or the other will prevail? Convergence?

  1. Gaming in Education
    1. student motivation, student-centered learning, personalized learning
    2. continued practice, clear goals and immediate feedback
    3. project-based learning, Minecraft and SimCity EDU
    4. Gamification of learning versus learning with games
    5. organizations to promote gaming and gamification in education (p. 6 http://scsu.mn/1F008Re)
    6. the “chocolate-covered broccoli” problem

Discussion: why gaming and gamification is not accepted in a higher rate? what are the hurdles to enable greater faster acceptance? What do you think, you can do to accelerate this process?

  1. Gaming in an academic library
    1. why the academic library? sandbox for experimentation
    2. the connection between digital literacy and gaming and gamificiation
    3. Gilchrist and Zald’s model for instruction design through assessment
    4. the new type of library instruction:
      in house versus out-of-the box games. Gamification of the process
      http://web.stcloudstate.edu/pmiltenoff/bi/

Discussion: based on the example (http://web.stcloudstate.edu/pmiltenoff/bi/), how do you see transforming academic library services to meet the demands of 21st century education?

  1. Gaming, gamification and assessment (badges)
    1. inability of current assessments to evaluate games as part of the learning process
    2. “microcredentialing” through digital badges
    3. Mozilla Open Badges and Badgestack
    4. leaderboards

Discussion: How do you see a transition from the traditional assessment to a new and more flexible academic assessment?

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