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instructional designers and tech adoption

Survey: Instructional Designers ‘Pivotal’ in Tech Adoption

By Dian Schaffhauser 05/09/16

https://campustechnology.com/articles/2016/05/09/survey-instructional-designers-pivotal-in-tech-adoption.aspx

Managing projects is the most common task instructional designers undertake during their days, followed by technology and pedagogical training. Their biggest obstacle to success on the job is faculty resistance. The most important expertise they possess as a whole is the ability to learn new technologies, followed by project management and learning science or theory. Their favorite tools to work with are Camtasia and Adobe products; their least-favorite are Blackboard and learning management systems in general.

  • Consider adding more resources in the area of instructional design. If that isn’t possible, at least consider involving instructional designers “early” and “often” during technology transitions.”
  • “Incentivize” faculty to work with instructional designers “from the get-go” in order to help them learn how to engage with their students and expand class time through the use of online tools.
  • Technology providers should work closely with instructional designers in the selection of digital tools.

The report, “Instructional Design in Higher Education,” is freely available on the Intentional Futures website here.

Instructional Design in Higher Education

http://intentionalfutures.com/reports/instructional_design/

p. 4 Graph: median number of instructional designers by type of institution. According to the graph, SCSU must have between 3 and 16 instructional designers.

p. 10.“While a ‘jack-of-all-trades’ can get by in instructional design, the best instructional designers are ‘aces-of-many-trades’,with authentic experience and training in all aspects of the process.”

p. 12“Management choose[s] tools that are cheap and never ask[s] about integration or accessibility.Then we spend enormous amounts of time trying to get them to work.”

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more in this IMS blog on instructional design

https://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=instructional

Learning Spaces and Instructional Technology

Special Interest Group: Learning Spaces and Instructional Technology (SIG) webinars are FREE and open to anyone. Please feel free to share this with others at your institution.

Dynamic Discussion Artifacts: Moving Beyond Threaded Discussion

Description

This session will describe an approach to online discussions that moves beyond the threaded message boards of D2L Brightspace, yet still maintained an asynchronous online delivery. Using teams, discussions were differentiated by product to allow students to turn in an artifact that represented their shared understanding during specific online course modules.  Strategies, Technology guides, rubrics, and student feedback will be shared.

Presenter: Michael Manderfeld
Senior Instructional Designer
Minnesota State University Mankato

When
Where
https://moqi.zoom.us/j/672493176 (link to virtual room)

 

 

Notes from the previous session available here:

Active Learning Classrooms

Instructional Design

7 Things You Should Know About Developments in Instructional Design

http://www.educause.edu/library/resources/7-things-you-should-know-about-developments-instructional-design

Please read the entire EducCause article here: eli7120

discussion of IMS with faculty:

  • pedagogical theories
  • learning outcome
  • design activities
  • students’ multimedia assignments, which lead to online resources
  • collaboration with other departments for the students projects
  • moving the class to online environment (even if kept hybrid)

What is it?

the complexity of the learning environment is turning instructional design into a more dynamic activity, responding to changing educational models and expectations. Flipped classrooms, makerspaces, and competency-based learning are changing how instructors work with students, how students work with course content, and how mastery is verified. Mobile computing, cloud computing, and data-rich repositories have altered ideas about where and how learning takes place.

How does it work?

One consequence of these changes is that designers can find themselves filling a variety of roles. Today’s instructional designer might work with subject-matter experts, coders, graphic designers, and others. Moreover, the work of an instructional designer increasingly continues throughout the duration of a course rather than taking place upfront.

Who’s doing it?

The responsibility for designing instruction traditionally fell to the instructor of a course, and in many cases it continues to do so. Given the expanding role and landscape of technology—as well as the growing body of knowledge about learning and about educational activities and assessments— dedicated instructional designers are increasingly common and often take a stronger role.

Why is it significant?

The focus on student-centered learning, for example, has spurred the creation of complex integrated learning environments that comprise multiple instructional modules. Competency-based learning allows students to progress at their own pace and finish assignments, courses, and degree plans as time and skills permit. Data provided by analytics systems can help instructional designers predict which pedagogical approaches might be most effective and tailor learning experiences accordingly. The use of mobile learning continues to grow, enabling new kinds of learning experiences.

What are the downsides?

Given the range of competencies needed for the position, finding and hiring instructional designers who fit well into particular institutional cultures can be challenging to the extent that instructors hand over greater amounts of the design process to instructional designers, some of those instructors will feel that they are giving up control, which, in some cases, might appear to be simply the latest threat to faculty authority and autonomy. My note: and this is why SCSU Academic Technology is lead by faculty not IT staff. 

Where is it going?

In some contexts, instructional designers might work more directly with students, teaching them lifelong learning skills. Students might begin coursework by choosing from a menu of options, creating their own path through content, making choices about learning options, being more hands-on, and selecting best approaches for demonstrating mastery. Educational models that feature adaptive and personalized learning will increasingly be a focus of instructional design. My note: SCSU CETL does not understand instructional design tendencies AT ALL. Instead of grooming faculty to assume the the leadership role and fill out the demand for instructional design, it isolates and downgrades (keeping traditional and old-fashioned) instructional design to basic tasks of technicalities done by IT staff.

What are the implications for teaching and learning?

By helping align educational activities with a growing understanding of the conditions,
tools, and techniques that enable better learning, instructional designers can help higher education take full advantage of new and emerging models of education. Instructional
designers bring a cross-disciplinary approach to their work, showing faculty how learning activities used in particular subject areas might be effective in others. In this way, instructional
designers can cultivate a measure of consistency across courses and disciplines in how educational strategies and techniques are incorporated. Designers can also facilitate the
creation of inclusive learning environments that offer choices to students with varying strengths and preferences.

More on instructional design in this IMS blog:

https://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2014/10/13/instructional-design/

Instructional sessions for Adobe Creative Suite and other technologies available

Instructional sessions for Adobe Creative Suite and other technologies available

Good morning all,

Please consider one-on-one and/or team sessions regarding the use of the Adobe Creative Suite as well as the use of other technologies in the educational process.

Please contact InforMedia Services (IMS), ims@stcloudstate.edu, for any questions, scheduling etc.

IMS (http://lrts.stcloudstate.edu/library/general/ims/default.asp) consists of faculty, who are willing and able to help faculty, staff and students with their academic endeavors in technology. We offer one-on-one sessions, workshops, instructional sessions and in-class technology instructions.

Follow us:

IMS blog: https://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/ (keyword: mobile devices)

Twitter: https://twitter.com/SCSUtechinstruc

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/InforMediaServices?ref=hl

Pinterest: http://www.pinterest.com/scsutechnology/

Instagram: http://instagram.com/scsutechinstruct

YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC_UMIE5r6YB8KzTF5nZJFyA

Google +: https://plus.google.com/u/0/115966710162153290760/posts/p/pub

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/scsuinstructionaltechnology

Since IMS does not have access to the FacultyStaffAll listserv and cannot reach all campus as the message below, please feel welcome and encouraged to forward this email to your colleagues across unions.

Have a successful new academic year.

 

 

From: SCSU Information Technology
Sent: Tuesday, August 26, 2014 8:26 AM
To: FacultyStaffAll
Subject: Adobe Creative Cloud Site License

 

We are pleased to announce that we have renewed the Adobe site license for university-owned computers on campus.  This means that the Adobe Creative Cloud Master Collection (includes Acrobat, Photoshop, InDesign, Illustrator, Dreamweaver, After Effects, Premier Pro, Fireworks, Flash, Lightroom, and more) is able to be installed on any university-owned computer at no additional cost to you.

 

Campus Use

If you would like the use of these applications, please email huskytech@stcloudstate.edu with the details of which applications you would like installed on your university-owned computer.  Because it is the first week of the semester and technicians are quite busy right now, we ask for your patience with these installations.
NOTE: Not all campus computers are capable of running these programs. A technician will work with you to make sure your computer is capable of running this software before installing.

 

Personal Use

In addition, this campus site license includes a copy of Adobe Master Collection that can be installed on a faculty or staff person’s home computer for a yearly fee of $9.75.
Link to purchase personal version:  http://stcloudstate.onthehub.com/WebStore/OfferingDetails.aspx?o=c7e8f835-08b1-e311-93fb-b8ca3a5db7a1
NOTE: Students are NOT eligible for this at-home use.  Students can purchase Adobe Creative Cloud for a monthly fee of $19.99.

 

Please contact HuskyTech at 320-308-7000 or huskytech@stcloudstate.edu with any questions!

 

Thank you,

Casey Gordon
Technology Support Services Director
Information Technology Services
MC 112C | 320-308-4711 | cjgordon@stcloudstate.edu
St. Cloud State University

Blended Learning and Blended Instructional Model

Blended Learning: Resource Roundup

http://www.edutopia.org/blended-learning-resources

4 Tips for Getting to Know the Blended Instructional Model

http://www.edutopia.org/blog/getting-to-know-blended-learning-victor-small

Tip #1: Kids Aren’t as Tech Savvy as You Think

Tip #2: Be Wary of Online Textbooks and Online Classes

Tip #3: PowerPoint is for Planning Lessons, Not Delivering Lectures

Tip #4: Get Your Students to Communicate with Each Other

What does an Instructional Designer do?

What does an Instructional Designer do?

Would you like to discuss designing course materials or entire course?
Please contact us:

InforMedia Services

informedia@stcloudstate.edu

pmiltenoff@stcloudstate.edu

trhergert@stcloudstate.edu

Contact us via social media:

IMS blog: https://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/SCSUtechinstruc

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/InforMediaServices?ref=hl

Pinterest: http://www.pinterest.com/scsutechnology/

Instagram: http://instagram.com/scsutechinstruct

YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC_UMIE5r6YB8KzTF5nZJFyA

Google +: https://plus.google.com/u/0/115966710162153290760/posts/p/pub

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/scsuinstructionaltechnology

instructional sessions avaialble on the Adobe Creative Cloud Master Collection

With the announcement of the site license for the Adobe Creative Suite (Acrobat, Photoshop, InDesign, Illustrator, Dreamweaver, After Effects, Premier Pro, Fireworks, Flash, Lightroom, and more) InforMedia Services will be offering instruction, consulting, and support for faculty, staff, and students who want to learn and use these tools. We expect to schedule specific workshops in the next few weeks. Until those are publicized, please email informedia@stcloudstate.edu for assistance. We can work with individuals, groups of faculty, staff, or students, or present opportunities to classes.

Please let us know how we can help you— informedia@stcloudstate.edu.

Plamen Miltenoff and Tom Hergert

InforMedia Services

informedia@stcloudstate.edu

pmiltenoff@stcloudstate.edu

trhergert@stcloudstate.edu

Contact us via social media:

IMS blog: https://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/SCSUtechinstruc

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/InforMediaServices?ref=hl

Pinterest: http://www.pinterest.com/scsutechnology/

Instagram: http://instagram.com/scsutechinstruct

YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC_UMIE5r6YB8KzTF5nZJFyA

Google +: https://plus.google.com/u/0/115966710162153290760/posts/p/pub

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/scsuinstructionaltechnology

Translating Constructivism into Instructional Design: Potential and Limitations.

Karagiorgi, Y., & Symeou, L. (2005). Translating Constructivism into Instructional Design: Potential and Limitations. Journal of Educational Technology & Society, 8(1), 17–27.
http://login.libproxy.stcloudstate.edu/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&AuthType=ip&db=aph&AN=85866335 PDF available
p. 18 Knowledge for constructivism cannot be imposed or transferred intact from the mind of one knower to the mind of another. Therefore, learning and teaching cannot be synonymous: we can teach, even well, without having students learn
p. 19 In the traditional approach, the instructional designer analyses the conditions – such as the content, the learner, and the instructional setting – which bear on the instructional system, in preparation for the specification of intended learning outcomes. In the constructivist approach, the instructional content cannot be pre-specified. Constructivist designers avoid the breaking down of context into component parts as traditional instructional designers do, but are in favour of environments in which knowledge, skills, and complexity exist naturally.
The goal, for instance, is not to teach a particular version of history, but to teach someone how to think like a historian.
p. 19 In traditional instruction, this phase involves the design of a sequence to achieve specified performance objectives.
Yiasemina Karagiorgi

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