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Never Work Harder Than Your Students…

Never Work Harder Than Your Students… Use Technology

http://www.rundesroom.com/2011/07/never-work-harder-than-your-students.html

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1)  Start Where Your Students Are …
2)  Know Where Your Students Are Going …
3)  Expect Students To Get To Their Goals
4)  Support Students Along The Way
http://www.transl8it.com – (English to text lingo conversion – I blogged about this last night – see my post below).
Google Translate – Language translation – spells it (correctly and phonetically), and says it.
Skype – great for author conferences, social studies (talk to people in other countries), keep a student connected who has been absent, or is away on a trip.
https://posterous.com/ – easy way to create your own blog through your email – great for setting up a class blog to keep students / parents informed.
5)  Use Feedback
edmodo.com – It’s almost like a kind of facebook – but you can set it up for your classroom – post questions, reading clubs, etc. and give feedback to students as they answer questions.
ed.voicethread.com
https://docs.google.com – Students can use this for their writing assignments, and not worry about bringing files back and forth to school.  Teachers have access to the page to make corrections / give feedback throughout the writing process.
6)  Focus on Quality Rather Than Quantity
edu.glogster.com – I’ve set up an account with glogster so we can make multi-media posters next year.  I can so see myself using this with science / social studies.
http://www.animoto.com/education – A site for making movies and slideshows.
photopeach.com/education – Another site for making movies and slideshows.
http://www.jaycut.com – Yet another site for making movies and slideshows – this one looks like it has a few more features (like slow-motion).
blabberize.com – Bring your still pictures to life by making them talk – I can so see myself using this next year with my SMARTboard lessons!  Wouldn’t it be cool to make a fraction talk and explain how to do a concept during a math lesson?!?
http://www.wikispaces.com – I am definitely going to investigate this one further.  I’d like to make a wiki for one of my science units next year – assigning students a different part or concept, and then putting it all together.  We could even print off the pages later and turn them into our own reference book.
livebinder.com – A lot of the teachers at the webinar talked about how they would use this resource to set up student portfolios … hmmmmm … intriguing.
epubbud.com – Students can create their own ebooks (which other people can access) and display them on a shelf (similar in looks to shelfari).  A great way to publish their writing, and make the writing process more authentic for them.
http://www.prezi.com – Another multi-media site great for presentations.  Use as an introduction to a new unit, or have students create their own presentations for a certain topic.

7)  Never Work Harder Than Your Students

Mobile Video Advertising

Mobile Video Advertising Still The Hot Ticket

http://www.mediapost.com/publications/article/236980/mobile-video-advertising-still-the-hot-ticket.html

Traffic Share (Mobile Phone Operating System)
Operating System Share of Traffic Share of Revenue
Android

57.64%

41.77%

iOS

30.2

51.20

Other

6.37

5.91

Symbian

4.37

0.47

BlackBerry

1.20

0.49

Windows

0.22

0.12

Source: Opera Mediaworks, October 2014

Social Networking is still the most popular category in mobile advertising, accounting for about 1 in 5 ad impressions. At the same time, Music, Video and Media sites and apps drive the most revenue, with 23%

Google+

How to Use Google+ Profiles and Pages for Better Visibility

http://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/google-plus-profiles-pages-for-better-visibility/

G+

#1: Claim a Custom URL

#2: Optimize for Search

#3: Leverage Personal Audiences

Don’t be afraid to use your personal Google+ profile for business. When leveraged well, it’s a powerful tool!

With your Google+ page and profile optimized, you’re well-positioned to consistentlybuild and engage your audiences over time. Actively participating and sharing content on Google+ is key to long-term success, so make sure your posts stand out from the crowd by maximizing engagement.

Boost Twitter Engagement

5 Ways to Boost Your Twitter Engagement

http://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/5-ways-boost-twitter-engagement/

#1: Refine Your Twitter Bio

#2: Act Human

#3: Ask People to Act

If you want followers, you can get more of them. If you want shares, you can get more of those, too. All you have to do is ask.

Even big brands understand the power of asking for a retweet.

Your goal is to get more engagement for your tweets, right? Sometimes you just have to ask, and many times people are happy to oblige.

#4: Harness the Power of Hashtags

Hashtags let you interact with the most viral and current topics at any given time.

Hashtags can double your Twitter engagement rate, increase your number of followers and improve your reputation.

#5: Post Consistently

QQML2015

7th Qualitative and Quantitative Methods in Libraries International Conference (QQML2015) 26-29 May 2015, IUT-Descartes University, Paris, France

Dear Colleagues and Friends,

It is our pleasure to invite you in Paris (IUT-Descartes University) for the 7th Qualitative and Quantitative Methods in Libraries International Conference (QQML2015,  http://www.isast.org) which is organized under the umbrella of ISAST (International Society for the Advancement of Science and Technology).

This is the seventh year of the conference which brings together different disciplines on library and information science; it is a multi–disciplinary conference that covers the Library and Information Science topics in conjunction to other disciplines (e.g. innovation and economics, management and marketing, statistics and data analysis, information technology, human resources, museums, archives, special librarianship, etc).

The conference invites special and contributed sessions, oral communications, workshops and posters.

Target Group

The target group and the audience are library and archives professionals in a more general sense: professors, researchers, students, administrators, stakeholders, librarians, technologists, museum scientists, archivists, decision makers and managers.

Main topics

The emphasis is given to the models and the initiatives that run under the budget restrictions, such as the Information Management and the innovation, the crisis management, the long-term access, the synergies and partnership, the open access movement and technological development.

The conference will consider, but not be limited to, the following indicative themes:

  1. 1.                Information and Knowledge Management
  2. 2.                Synergies, Organizational Models and Information Systems
  3. 3.                Open Data, Open Access, Analysis and Applications
  4. 4.                Multimedia Systems and Applications
  5. 5.                Computer Networks and Social Networks,
  6. 6.                Health Reference and Informatics
  7. 7.                Information Technologies in Education
  8. 8.                Decision making in service innovation
  9. 9.                Data Mining, content analysis, taxonomies, ontologies
  10. 10.    STM information development

 

Special Sessions – Workshops

You may send proposals for Special Sessions (4-6 papers) or Workshops (more than 2 sessions) including the title and a brief description at:  secretar@isast.org or from the electronic submission at the web page: http://www.isast.org/abstractsubmission.html

You may also send Abstracts/Papers to be included in the proposed sessions, to new sessions or as contributed papers at the web page: http://www.isast.org/abstractsubmission.html

Registrations are registration forms are available from: http://www.isast.org/qqml2015registration.html

Contributions may be realized through one of the following ways

a. structured abstracts (not exceeding 500 words) and presentation;

b. full papers (not exceeding 7,000 words);

c. posters (not exceeding 2,500 words);

In all the above cases at least one of the authors ought to be registered in the conference.

Abstracts and full papers should be submitted electronically within the timetable provided in the web page: http://www.isast.org/.

The abstracts and full papers should be in compliance to the author guidelines: http://www.isast.org/

All abstracts will be published in the Conference Book of Abstracts and in the website of the Conference. The papers of the conference will be published in the website of the conference, after the permission of the author(s).

Student submissions

Professors and Supervisors are encouraged to organize conference sessions of Postgraduate theses and dissertations.

Please direct any questions regarding the QQML 2015 Conference and Student Research Presentations to: the secretariat of the conference at: secretar@isast.org  

Important dates:

First call of proposals: 29th of September 2014

Deadline of abstracts submitted: 20 December 2014

Reviewer’s response: in 3 weeks after submission

Early registration: 30th of March 2015

Paper and Presentation Slides: 1st of May 2015

Conference dates: 26-29 May 2015

Paper contributors have the opportunity to be published in the QQML e- Journal, which continues to retain the right of first choice, however in addition they have the chance to be published in other scientific journals.

QQML e- Journal is included in EBSCOhost and DOAJ (Directory of Open Access Journals).

Submissions of abstracts to special or contributed sessions could be sent directly to the conference secretariat at secretar@isast.org. Please refer to the Session Number, as they are referred at the conference website to help the secretariat to classify the submissions.

For more information and Abstract/Paper submission and Special Session Proposals please visit the conference website at: http://www.isast.org or contact the secretary of the conference at : secretar@isast.org

Looking forward to welcoming you in Paris,

With our best regards,

On behalf of the Conference Committee

Dr. Anthi Katsirikou, Conference Co-Chair
University of Piraeus Library Director
Head, European Documentation Center
Board Member of the Greek Association of Librarians and Information Professionals

anthi@asmda.com

 

Professor Joumana Boustany

Local Chair

Université Paris Descartes – IUT,

143, avenue de Versailles –

75016 Paris

joumana.boustany@parisdescartes.fr

Gaming the college system

http://www.economist.com/blogs/babbage/2014/09/difference-engine

In their latest book “Aspiring Adults Adrift”, sociologists Richard Arum and Josipa Roksa, of New York University and the University of Virginia respectively, fear that universities focus too much these days on students’ social lives at the expense of academic rigor.

Two out of three students at American universities and colleges change their major at least once during their four years on campus; one in five does so two or three times.

parents should let their preferences be known, but then leave the selection proces to their daughter or son, hopefully guided by a school councillor rather than merely friends. Another piece of advice was to visit as many campuses as possible beforehand.

getting a university degree, even merely a baccalaureate, is worth it nowadays. According to the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, the median annual wage of Americans with a bachelor degree, and lucky enough to have found (not easy) full employment, was $48,000 last year, compared with a little over $25,000 for those with only a high-school diploma. But college graduates in the lower quartile made no more than $27,000.

 

Library; what should be…

Amidst discussions at LRS and forthcoming strategic planning –

The LinkedIn Higher Education Teaching and Learning group has a discussion started:

“The library as space is becoming more important, even as students are able to log on to databases from wherever.”

based on the the article

Spikes, Stacks, and Spaces

from Inside Higher Ed blog: https://www.insidehighered.com/blogs/confessions-community-college-dean/spikes-stacks-and-spaces


  • Julie Steward
    Julie

    Julie Steward

    Instructional Designer

    University libraries are increasingly the ONLY place on campus that has quiet spaces, since cell-phone conversations are ubiquitous. I think a professional shushher would be a nice touch to any library. Either that, or zero-talking floors and okay-with-some-noise-floors alternating.

  • Andrea KiralyAndrea

    Andrea Kiraly

    Information Specialist, Visiting Lecturer at University of Szeged

    Today university/academic libraries have “all-inclusive services” and they are places for social life, too. In my point of view it is very important for libraries to be always ready for changes, to be regenerative, and to find new ways including the needs of next (Y, Z?) generation. A library is a third place, “a place to be”. And study. With librarians behind the scenes.

    Russ B. likes this

  • Russ BarclayRuss

    Russ Barclay

    Visiting Professor at Campbellsville University

    I note many university libraries have become bistros complete with internet access and quiet rooms for students and student teams to meet and work.

    …And, of course, there are books and databases. Whether students attend to those assets is an open question for me.

  • Sharon BlantonSharon

    Sharon Blanton

    Vice President and Chief Information Officer at Hawaii Pacific University

    I had the opportunity to spend some time in a local high school library yesterday. It was a hub of activity with a class in session, students browsing stacks, small group activities, and numerous meetings. I thought it was great to see so many students collaborating and having fun. The students were very engaged.

    Stephen L. likes this

  • Laura GabigerLaura

    Laura Gabiger

    Professor at Johnson & Wales University

    Top Contributor

    It seems important that Matt Reed mentions both the group study areas and the individual quiet spaces in a library. In the past, university libraries tended to be places for individual quiet work. But as Russ and Sharon mention, students have meetings in libraries to work on group activities. If we pay attention to developments in higher education, student work will be increasingly collaborative rather than individual, interdisciplinary rather than narrowly focused in one disciplinary area. In the USA we can find these values set forth in places such as the AAC&U list of high-impact practices, where collaborative assignments and projects are recommended:http://www.aacu.org/sites/default/files/files/hip_tables.pdf

    Some experts recommend that the most valuable things students can learn to do is work on problem-solving with other people who come from diverse backgrounds.

    Libraries may need less space for stacks as printed books and periodicals are replaced with digital storage, but the need for meeting rooms and collaborative study areas may increase. And of course a coffee shop on the premises definitely helps.

    Stephen L. likes this

  • Dr..Myrna FernandoDr..Myrna

    Dr..Myrna Fernando

    Professor 1 at Technological University of the Philippines

    What is the bearing of a library as a Learning Resource Center if not significant to the students. I think it speaks so much on the learning impact not only by the students together with the faculty. This is also the reason why the area of Library is included in institutional/programs accreditation.

Video Creation and Editing 101

Video Creation and Editing 101

http://www.freetech4teachers.com/2014/08/video-creation-and-editing-101.htm



more resources from our IMS blog on video editing:

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2014/06/24/social-media-how-to-create-awesome-online-videos-tools-and-software-to-make-it-easy/

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2014/06/19/how-to-use-the-free-youtube-video-editor/

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2014/03/15/free-technology-for-teachers-5-video-projects-to-try-with-your-students/

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2014/02/07/videonotes-free-web-tool-that-allows-students-to-take-notes-on-a-video-they-are-watching/

Per Tom Hergert:

The Vimeo Blog: Editing 101
https://vimeo.com/blog/post/5-tips-to-instantly-improve-your-compositions

https://vimeo.com/blog/post/master-your-iphone-settings-for-boastfully-beautif

https://vimeo.com/blog/post/teach-yourself-filmmaking-3-tips-from-self-taught

https://vimeo.com/blog/post/video-editing-101-free-tips-for-wrangling-imovie-p

https://vimeo.com/blog/post/ep1-welcome-to-mastering-mobile-video

 

Horizon Report 2014, Library edition

http://cdn.nmc.org/media/2014-nmc-horizon-report-library-EN.pdf

p. 4 new and rapidly changing technologies, an abundance of digital information in myriad formats, an increased understanding of how students learn evolving research methods, and changing practices in how scholars communicate and disseminate their research and creative work.

Engagement requires an outward focus

A liaison who understands how scholars in a particular discipline communicate and share
information with one another can inform the design and development of new publishing services, such as
digital institutional repositories.

Liaisons cannot be experts themselves in each new capability, but knowing when to call in a
colleague, or how to describe appropriate expert capabilities to faculty, will be key to the new liaison role.

an increasing focus on what users do (research, teaching, and learning) rather than on what librarians do (collections, reference, library instruction).

hybrid model, where liaisons pair their expertise with that of functional specialists, both within and outside of libraries

p. 6 Trend 1: Develop user-centered library services

Many libraries are challenged to brand such a service point, citing a “hub” or “center” to refer to services that can include circulation, reference, computer support, writing assistance, and more.

For liaisons, time at a reference desk has been replaced by anticipating recurrent needs and developing
easily accessible online materials (e.g., LibGuides, screencasts) available to anyone at any time, and
by providing more advanced one-on-one consultations with students, instructors, and researchers who
need expert help. Liaisons not only answer questions using library resources, but they also advise and
collaborate on issues of copyright, scholarly communication, data management, knowledge management,
and information literacy. The base level of knowledge that a liaison must possess is much broader than
familiarity with a reference collection or facility with online searching; instead, they must constantly keep up
with evolving pedagogies and research methods, rapidly developing tools, technologies, and ever-changing
policies that facilitate and inform teaching, learning, and research in their assigned disciplines.

Librarians at many institutions are now focusing on collaborating with faculty to develop thoughtful assignments
and provide online instructional materials that are built into key courses within a curriculum and provide
scaffolding to help students develop library research skills over the course of their academic careers

p. 7 Trend 2: A hybrid model of liaison and functional specialist is emerging.

Current specialist areas of expertise include copyright, geographic information systems (GIS), media production and integration, distributed education or e-learning, data management, emerging technologies,
user experience, instructional design, and bioinformatics.

At the University of Guelph, the liaison model was abandoned altogether in favor of a functional specialist
approach

p. 8 Trend 3: Organizational flexibility must meet changing user needs.

p. 9 provide education and consultation services for personal information management. Tools, workshops, websites, and individual consults are offered in areas such as citation management, productivity tools, managing alerts and feeds, personal archiving, and using social networking for teaching and professional development.

p. 11 data management, knowledge management and scholarly communication

digital scholarship

p. 12 Liaisons need to be able to provide a general level of knowledge about copyright, data management, the need for metadata and the ontologies available in their disciplines.

p. 13 Liaisons need to be able to provide a general level of knowledge about copyright, data management, the need for metadata and the ontologies available in their disciplines.

p. 16 replacing the traditional tripartite model of collections, reference, and instruction

10 Twitter Tactics to Increase Your Engagement

10 Twitter Tactics to Increase Your Engagement

http://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/twitter-tactics-to-increase-engagement/

#1: Keep Tweets Under 110 Characters 

#2: Tweet During Daytime Hours 

#3: Tweet on Saturday and Sunday

#4: Share Images 

#5: Ask for Retweets 

#6: Use Hashtags 

#7: Include Links 

#8: Stay Away From Lifestyle Tweets

#9: Use Strong Calls to Action 

#10: Send One to Four Tweets a Day 

What do you think? What Twitter techniques do you use to create engagement? Do you have additional advice for others? Please leave your comments below.

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