Searching for "tablets"

tablets library

Bornett, C. C. (2016). Leseförderung digital genial: WieTablets die Bibliothekspädagogik verändern / Tipps nicht nur für Bilderbuch-Apps. (German). Bub: Forum Bibliothek Und Information, 68(10), 606-608.

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Šorgo, A., Bartol, T., Dolničar, D., & Podgornik, B. B. (2017). Attributes of digital natives as predictors of information literacy in higher education. British Journal Of Educational Technology, 48(3), 749-767. doi:10.1111/bjet.12451   http://login.libproxy.stcloudstate.edu/login?qurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ebscohost.com%2flogin.aspx%3fdirect%3dtrue%26db%3dkeh%26AN%3d122273174%26site%3dehost-live%26scope%3dsite
(PDF available through ILL)
Biology, IT faculty Maribor, Slovenia. None of them is a librarian

Correlation and regression analysis based on survey data revealed that the attributes of digital natives are poor predictors of IL. information and communication technologies (ICT) experiences expressed as the sum of the use of different applications do not necessarily contribute to IL; some applications have a positive and some a negative effect; personal ownership of smartphones, portable computers and desktop computers has no direct effect on IL, while ownership of a tablet computer is actually a negative predictor; personal ownership of ICT devices has an impact on ICT experiences and Internet confidence, and, therefore, an indirect impact on IL; and ICT-rich university courses (if not designed to cultivate IL) have only a marginal impact on IL, although they may have some impact on ICT experiences and Internet confidence. The overall conclusion is that digital natives are not necessarily information literate, and that IL should be promoted with hands-on and minds-on courses based on IL standards.

Sharman, A. (2014). Roving Librarian: The Suitability of Tablets in Providing Personalized Help Outside of the Traditional Library. New Review Of Academic Librarianship, 20(2), 185-203. doi:10.1080/13614533.2014.914959

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McRae, L. l. (2015). TEACHING IN AN AGE OF UBIQUITOUS COMPUTING: A DECELERATED CURRICULUM. Digital Culture & Education, 7131-145.
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more on mobile devices in the library in this IMS blog
https://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=mobile+devices+library

detachable tablets

iPad Shipments Plummet as Detachable Tablets Double

By David Nagel 02/09/16

Why the sudden popularity of detachables?

According to IDC: “One of the biggest reasons why detachables are growing so fast is because end users are seeing those devices as PC replacements,” said Jean Philippe Bouchard, Research Director, Tablets at IDC.

http://icharts.net/chartchannel/top-5-ww-tablet-vendors-unit-shipments-millions-2015q4_mh7ryshbc

More about tablets and laptops in this IMS blog:

https://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/?s=tablet&submit=Search

tablets

Tablet Shipments Drop 7 Percent in Second Quarter of 2015 with Apple Posting Largest Decline

http://thejournal.com/articles/2015/08/05/tablet-shipments-drop-7-percent-in-second-quarter-of-2015-with-apple-posting-largest-decline.aspx

Apple saw the largest decline

“Longer life cycles, increased competition from other categories such as larger smartphones, combined with the fact that end users can install the latest operating systems on their older tablets has stifled the initial enthusiasm for these devices in the consumer market,”

 

interactive boards versus tablets

I am repeating the fact below since as soon as the iPAD came out on the market. Pity that campus does not listen. Well, it is not the first fact I am sharing on campus and nobody listens.

http://ww2.kqed.org/mindshift/2014/02/24/for-cash-strapped-schools-smart-ways-to-spend-limited-technology-dollars/

“The functions of an interactive whiteboard can be mimicked with a large screen TV and a Chromecast device, which also allows teachers to use any device available whether it’s a document camera, phone, iPad or other tablet.”

tablets

Hands-on with the new Apple iPad Air 2 and iPad Mini 3

http://www.cnet.com/pictures/apples-refreshed-ipad-line-pictures/

Apple created the A8X processor specifically for the iPad Air 2. The new chip has a second-generation 64-bit architecture, houses 3 billion transistors, and compared to the iPhone 6‘s A8 chip, has a 40 percent faster CPU, while its GPU is 2.5 times faster.

rear 8-megapixel iSight camera boasts a new sensor to capture 3,264×2,448 resolution photos and 1080p HD video.

Apple added an impressive anti-reflective coating to the iPad Air 2, which allegedly reduces glare by 56 percent.

Review: Microsoft’s Surface Pro 3 Merges Power and Productivity

http://www.edtechmagazine.com/k12/article/2014/10/review-microsoft-surface-pro-3-packs-punch

250-gigabyte hard drive, the Surface Pro 3 offers 15GB of online storage through Microsoft OneDrive

12-inch screen’s 3:2 aspect ratio

Intel Core i5 that could crunch large Adobe Photoshop and Microsoft PowerPoint files with ease

 

Tablets (iPADs) in the Classroom

From: Perry Bratcher [mailto:bratcher@nku.edu]
Sent: Wednesday, November 06, 2013 9:01 AM
To: ‘lita-l@ala.org’
Cc: Michael Providenti; Michael Wells; Millie Mclemore; Perry Bratcher; Stephen Moon
Subject: [lita-l] RE: Classroom iPads

All – Thanks to each of you for your responses to my email regarding classroom use of iPads (see email at the bottom).  Listed below are is a summary of the comments I received.  I cut/pasted and have reconfigured these comments for this email, so some may be taken out of context.  NOTE: My systems staff have adamantly opposed using the Microsoft Surface.  We have a campus “tech bar” where student/staff can check out new devices for experimentation.  My staff said that the Surface doesn’t work in our particular situation for a variety of reasons and they prefer the iPad tablet option (if we go the tablet route).

Before deciding on implementation of PCs vs. laptops vs. tablet for use in a classroom setting, one needs to consider the motivation for doing so.  Space? Portability? Availability of apps?  Is there a demand for using personal devices for research, etc?  What type of portable device to use (iPad, Microsoft Surface, etc.)

Pros for using iPad/tablets:

  • Keep a few in there to provide examples of how to search on mobile devices.
  • The amount of apps and types of apps out there. Great education apps exist that do not exist elsewhere online or on other platforms (Android or Windows).
  • The iPad is flexible and allows you to regain that floor space you lose with computers and give the user privacy.
  • If setup correctly, the devices can be erased when they are returned so any private data is wiped.
  • Users can download additional apps, even purchase apps if you allow them.
  • They hold a charge much longer then any laptop or ChromeBook on the market.
  • Apple sold 94% of its iPads into education – the reason being that it’s a great education and research tool.
    • Another advantage that I can see boot up time. The iPad is instantly on and connected to the network. Perhaps this most applicable to last-minute library instruction or ad hoc group research?   However, if I had the choice, I would equip a classroom with MacBook Air SSDs
    • Understand how they need to be configured and the tools needed to do so. I created a kit for this not long ago for public libraries: http://www.macprofessionals.com/new-library-ipad-checkout-solution/   Thank you Chris Ross, Macprofessionals
    • UVA has been using iPads for instruction for about 2 years.  They have been very pleased with the results.
    • Our electronic classroom is very small, so we purchased 30 iPads over a year ago to allow teaching in our larger meeting room. There are definitely distinct advantages: flexibility, mobility, lack of technical infrastructure needed (wires, ports, etc.), and the myriad possibilities of apps.

 

Cons for using iPad/tablets:

  • Most mobile devices have not become “workhorse” devices as of yet, so much of the students’ research will still need to be done on a computer.
  • We haven’t seen any advantage to having them either – but our librarians use them sporadically for instruction.
  • Charging, syncing, configuring, Apple ID’s, erasing, cases, restrictions, printing, presenting, etc. For example if you want to present with these, you will need an Apple TV or an adapter. If you want to print you will need AirPrint supported printers or software. If you want to configure and erase you will need a Mac.
  • The challenge I have found is trying to use an inherently personal device in the typical one shot classroom environment. There are lots of things you need to consider. How will they access the wireless? What about taking notes? What about apps that require login? And much more.
  • Someone on staff is equipped and has the time to manage them.
  • We have a pool of 30 loan laptops, recently we have supplemented this with 11 loan iPads. The iPads have generally been very popular but wouldn’t work as a substitute for laptops. As many have mentioned when it comes to getting real work done they are inferior to laptops and people have commented as such.
  • As a complement to laptops though they are great – they are more portable and our nursing students love being able to carry them around and quickly access medical apps, take notes, check calculations etc. I definitely see them as being a valuable resource but if it’s an either/or proposition then I would go on the side of laptops.
  • My personal opinion is that it’s not a bad idea as a supplement to existing systems, but I’d be wary of  replacing more flexible with more limited ones, and am particularly wary of committing to one operating system/vendor (particularly one that tends to charge half-again to twice as much as their competitors with only limited advantages).
  • In a classroom setting (e.g. instruction room) I see little advantage of tablets;  their sole advantage from I can figure out is their portability.   Why force people into a limited device if it is only going to be in one room anyway?

 

handwriting to text

OneNote
OneNote is the obvious choice for anyone who is using a Microsoft Surface or other Windows-based tablet. It is also available to use on iPads and on Android tablets. The option to have handwriting converted to text is an outstanding feature.

Google Keep
If you’re a G Suite for Education user, Google Keep. It doesn’t have the handwriting-to-text function that OneNote offers.

Zoho Notebook
Zoho Notebook doesn’t have the name recognition of OneNote or Keep. Zoho Notebook has the most intuitive design or organization options of the three digital notebooks featured here.

The downside to Zoho Notebook is that the handwriting option only appears on the Android and iOS platforms. If the handwriting option worked in the Chrome or Edge web browsers,

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more on screencasting lecturecapture in this iMS blog
https://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=touch+screen

screen time and brain development

http://blogs.edweek.org/edweek/DigitalEducation/2018/12/early_results_of_study_show_sc.html

The Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development study tested 4,500 9-10-year-olds in its first released dataset. The ABCD study is the largest long-term study of brain development in U.S.

Early data from the study, analyzed by another group of researchers from the CHEO Research Institute’s Healthy Active Living and Obesity also showed that kids who spend less than two hours a day on screens, participated in 60 minutes of moderate-to-vigorous-intensity physical activity, and received nine to 11 hours of uninterrupted sleep had higher cognitive abilities.Cognition was measured by language abilities, episodic memory, executive function, attention, working memory, and processing speed.

lib admin tech lending

Survey of Academic Library Leadership: Evaluation of Library Info Technology Lending Programs (ISBN No:978-1-57440-591-0 )

https://www.primaryresearch.com/AddCart.aspx?ReportID=566

survey of 116 directors, deans and other high level officials of academic libraries about how they feel about their library’s info technology lending programs.
data on the level of satisfaction with such programs, plans for library budget support
for these programs, and plans for new acquisitions of tablets, virtual reality
technology, laptops, digital cameras and other types of information
technology. In addition to looking at plans for the future, the report gives
detailed data on the level and nature of budgetary support for technology
lending programs over the past few years. Survey participants also comment on
which library constituencies use the programs the most.
  • Administrators over age 65 were much more likely than others to want to contract the program while those under age 50 were much less likely.
  • In general, the more sophisticated the degree offered by the college, the greater the likelihood that it had increased spending on its technology lending program over the past three years.
  • Art and architecture students were frequently cited as prime users of academic library technology lending programs.

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