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Collaborative cloud-based tools to consider, Real-Time Collaboration Tools

5 Free Cloud-Based Document Collaboration Tools to Power Your Productivity

http://ow.ly/qkji8

  1. Evernote
    Learn More about Evernote with These Excellent Video Tutorials ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning 
  2. Google Docs
    Kaizena: add audio comments to the  content of your Google documents http://www.educatorstechnology.com/2013/10/a-great-tool-to-add-audio-feedback-to.html 
  3. MindMeister (paid, might want to skip it)
  4. Trello
  5. WordPress

http://www.21things4teachers.net/3—collaboration-tools.html#!

Lino

Doodle  – Meeting Wizard

Google Drive, formerly known as Google Docs

The 10 best powerPoint Alternatives!
http://www.powtoon.com/blog/10-best-powerpoint-alternatives/

33 Highly Useful Presentation Tools
http://smallbiztrends.com/2009/09/33-useful-presentation-tools.html#!

Prezi http://philpresents.wordpress.com/2011/08/30/two-reasons-i-dont-recommend-prezi/

http://popplet.com/
http://stampsy.com
https://www.slideshark.com

20 Options for Real-Time Collaboration Tools

http://edtechreview.in/news/news/products-apps-tools/825-20-options-for-real-time-collaboration-tools

Neat Chat: It is one of the easiest and fastest ways to have online conversations with a group of friends or colleagues. It provides a clean, fast and robust chat room where you can share files, send private messages and even access conversations that happened in your absence.

Today’s Meet: Allows you to have quick conversations in private online chat rooms. It has a back channel which gives you the ability to adjust your audience’s needs and emotions. In your chat room you can use live stream to make comments, ask questions and use that feedback to tailor your presentations to address your audience’s needs

Zoho Writer: Is a powerful rich text-editor for Android devices, which allows you to create documents seamlessly with a rich feature-set. You can either save these docs in local devices or cloud devices like Zoho Docs. Zoho Docs workspace is a collaboration tool, which allows you to share work on the same doc with other people in real-time.

Scriblink: Is a free digital whiteboard that users can share online in real-time. It can be used by up to 5 users at the same time. It can be used just for fun or for more practical things like layout planning, concept diagramming, or tutoring a friend.

Stinto: Is for creating free chats and inviting others to join just by sending a simple link. It allows you to share photos and images with others. You can upload photos, sketches, diagrams, etc. to your chat for others to view.

Mind42: Allows collaborative online mind-mapping and brainstorming. It runs in your browser and allows you to manage your ideas alone or while working in a group. It allows you to quickly create, manage and edit the data structure required for mind maps.

Scribblar: Offers you an online whiteboard, real-time audio, document upload, text-chat and more. It is a perfect online-tutoring platform. You can use it to revise artwork and images; create brainstorming, product demos, interviews and tests.

CoSketch: Is a multi-user online whiteboard designed to give you the ability to quickly visualize and share your ideas as images. Anything you paint is shared in real-time and can be saved and embedded on forums, blogs, etc.

Twiddla: Is a real-time online collaboration tool, which allows text and audio chat in real-time. It also allows you to review websites within the application.

Etherpad: Is an open source online editor providing collaborative editing in real-time. You can write articles, press releases, to-do lists and more along with your friends or colleagues all working on the same doc at the same time.

Tinychat: It lets you create a private chat room in an instant, the URL of which can be emailed to others to participate in real-time. It is very easy to use and also has features to support video capability.

FlashMeeting: Is an easy-to-use online meeting application. A meeting is pre-booked by a registered user and a URL, containing a unique password for the meeting, is returned by the FlashMeeting server, which is passed on to the people who want to participate.

BigMarker: It combines messaging, file sharing and video calls into one place. BigMarker communities have features for conferencing for up to 100 people, presenting PowerPoints and other docs, sharing your screen, recording, storing, exporting sessions and more.

Meetin.gs: Is a web and mobile meeting organizer which brings the benefits of online collaboration to both online and offline meetings. It provides a dedicated online meeting space for scheduling, material sharing and agenda setting.

Conceptboard: It provides instant whiteboards to create a platform for you to communicate with your team. Feedback on visual content is easy and there is support for tasks, reports and more. It simplifies and improves collaboration on visual content and accelerates collaboration processes within your team.

Speek: Allows you to simply organize conference calls. Speek uses a personal or business link instead of a phone number and PIN for conference calls. Participants can join or start a call from their phone, web or mobile browser. You can see who’s joined, who’s talking, share files, use call controls and more.

Draw It Live: Is a free application that allows you to work together with other people to draw in real-time. You can create a whiteboard and share its URL with other people to let them join.

LiveMinutes: Is an online conferencing app. A unique URL address is created for your conference that you can share with people you want to connect with. You can share audio, virtual whiteboards, documents, etc. and a feature to share videos is coming soon.

FlockDraw: Is an online whiteboard based painting and drawing tool. It makes it easy to draw online free with multiple people participation. There can be unlimited people in a room with drawing updates in real-time.

VIDquik: Is a video-conferencing platform where you can connect and talk with anyone you want. You just need to enter the Email of the person you want to call, they click on the link and the two of you are in a web-based video call.

The MOOC Is Dead! Long Live Open Learning!

http://diyubook.com/2013/07/the-mooc-is-dead-long-live-open-learning/

We’re at a curious point in the hype cycle of educational innovation, where the hottest concept of the past year–Massive Open Online Courses, or MOOCs–is simultaneously being discovered by the mainstream media, even as the education-focused press is declaring them dead. “More Proof MOOCs are Hot,” and “MOOCs Embraced By Top Universities,” said the Wall Street Journal and USA Today last week upon the announcement that Coursera had received a $43 million round of funding to expand its offerings;
“Beyond MOOC Hype” was the nearly simultaneous headline in Inside Higher Ed.

Can MOOCs really be growing and dying at the same time?

The best way to resolve these contradictory signals is probably to accept that the MOOC, itself still an evolving innovation, is little more than a rhetorical catchall for a set of anxieties around teaching, learning, funding and connecting higher education to the digital world. This is a moment of cultural transition. Access to higher education is strained. The prices just keep rising. Questions about relevance are growing. The idea of millions of students from around the world learning from the worlds’ most famous professors at very small marginal cost, using the latest in artificial intelligence and high-bandwidth communications, is a captivating one that has drawn tens of millions in venture capital. Yet, partnerships between MOOC platforms and public institutions like SUNY and the University of California to create self-paced blended courses and multiple paths to degrees look like a sensible next step for the MOOC, but they are far from that revolutionary future. Separate ideas like blended learning and plain old online delivery seem to be blurring with and overtaking the MOOC–even Blackboard is using the term.

The time seems to be ripe for a reconsideration of the “Massive” impact of “Online” and “Open” learning. TheReclaim Open Learning initiative is a growing community of teachers, researchers and learners in higher education dedicated to this reconsideration. Supporters include the MIT Media Lab and the MacArthur Foundation-supported Digital Media and Learning Research Hub. I am honored to be associated with the project as a documentarian and beater of the drum.

Entries are currently open for our Innovation Contest, offering a $2000 incentive to either teachers or students who have projects to transform higher education in a direction that is connected and creative, is open as in open content and open as in open access, that is participatory, that takes advantage of some of the forms and practices that the MOOC also does but is not beholden to the narrow mainstream MOOC format (referring instead to some of the earlier iterations of student-created, distributed MOOCscreated by Dave Cormier, George Siemens, Stephen Downes and others.)

Current entries include a platform to facilitate peer to peer language learning, a Skype-based open-access seminar with guests from around the world, and a student-created course in educational technology. Go hereto add your entry! Deadline is August 2. Our judges include Cathy Davidson (HASTAC), Joi Ito (MIT), and Paul Kim (Stanford).

Reclaim Open Learning earlier sponsored a hackathon at the MIT Media Lab. This fall, September 27 and 28, our judges and contest winners will join us at a series of conversations and demo days to Reclaim Open Learning at the University of California, Irvine. If you’re interested in continuing the conversation, join us there or check us out online.

July 18, 2013

On Millennials

Millennials comprise the largest generational sector since the baby boomers. As this group enters the job market, training organizations will be forced to find new innovative ways to reach this new audience.

http://www.allencomm.com/3-strategies-to-engage-millennials-get-results/

Schaffhauser, D. (2015). American Millennials Not Terribly Bright When It Comes to Pretty Much Everything That Matters, Analysis Finds. Campus Technology. Retrieved from http://campustechnology.com/articles/2015/03/04/american-millennials-not-terribly-bright.aspx
America’s Skills Challenge: Millennials and the Future” actually examines data from a couple of years ago that came out of the Programme for the International Assessment of Adult Competencies (PIAAC) to compare the United States to 21 other member countries in the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD).

American PISA Scores Drop

12/03/13

http://thejournal.com/articles/2013/12/03/american-pisa-scores-drop.aspx
The numbers are in from the latest Programme for International Student Assessment(PISA), and for American students, as United States Department of EducationSecretary Arne Duncan put it, “It is a picture of educational stagnation.”
The problem is not that our 15-year-olds are performing worse today than before. The problem is that they’re simply not making progress. Students in many other nations are advancing instead of standing still. In a knowledge-based global economy where education is more important than ever before, both to individual success and collective prosperity, our students are basically losing ground. We’re running in place as other high performing countries start to lap us.”
Daniel Domenech, executive director of AASA, theSchool Superintendents Association. “The problem we find in American education isn’t that schools are ‘falling behind,’ it is that schools are ‘pulling apart.’ Poverty in America is the real issue behind today’s education gap.
Among the findings: Top-performing countries, primarily those in Asia, place great emphasis on selecting and training teachers, encourage them to work together and prioritize investment in teacher quality. They also set clear targets and give teachers autonomy in the classroom to achieve them.

American Millennials Not Terribly Bright When It Comes to Pretty Much Everything That Matters, Analysis Finds

http://campustechnology.com/articles/2015/03/04/american-millennials-not-terribly-bright.aspx

American Millennials Not Terribly Bright
American Millennials Not Terribly Bright

“This report suggests that far too many are graduating high school and completing postsecondary educational programs without receiving adequate skills,” the report stated. “If we expect to have a better educated population and a more competitive workforce, policy makers and other stakeholders will need to shift the conversation from one of educational attainment to one that acknowledges the growing importance of skills and examines these more critically.”

Quizzes and fun games (gamification)

Quizzes are considered mostly an assessment tool. The reward is in the end of the game. The player cannot “lose life.”

Students who are used to the logic of a game, expect rewards throughout the game.

Therefore, instead of a final assessment quiz, the class can be phased out with several training quizzes. Each of the training quizzes can allow students to have several attempts (equals lifes). In addition, students can be stimulated  format wise in playing the quizzes=gaming activity by some reward systems. E.g., for each training quiz being scored above B, students can collect badges/tockens, which they can redeem at the end of class. Content-wise, students can be stimulated in playing the quizzes=gaming activity by stepping on the next level and switching from text-based quizzes to quizzes including more multimedia: audio, video and interactivity

#techworkshop #pm great tool to combine with training D2L quizzes: http://quizlet.com
Here is a practical guide on games and quizzes with D2L
http://www.uww.edu/icit/instructional/teachingonline/games_quizzes.html

 

Those are the students we expect on campus: http://www.edweek.org/dd/articles/2012/06/13/03games.h05.html

Clickers, IPADs and stylus; http://www.as.ua.edu/ipad/drs-hong-min-park-emily-hencken-ritter-and-greg-vonnahme-ipads-in-political-science-pt-1/

Games and gamification

References

Frossard, F., Barajas, M., & Trifonova, A. (2012). A learner-centered game-design approach: Impacts on teachers’ creativity. Digital Education Review, (21), 13-22.

Fu-Hsing Tsai, Kuang-Chao Yu, & Hsien-Sheng Hsiao. (2012). Exploring the factors influencing learning effectiveness in digital game-based learning. Journal of Educational Technology & Society, 15(3), 240-250.

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