Migration and Diaspora in the Age of Information and Communication Technologies

Migration and Diaspora in the Age of Information and Communication Technologies
Pedro J. Oiarzabal a & Ulf-Dietrich Reips ba Institute of Human Rights, University of Deustob University of Deusto in Bilbao
(PDF) Migration and Diaspora in the Age of Information and Communication Technologies. Available from: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/231020178_Migration_and_Diaspora_in_the_Age_of_Information_and_Communication_Technologies [accessed Jul 01 2020].

MCOM 218- Peace for Our Planet

MCOM 218- Peace for Our Planet is now available as an LEP Goal 8 (Global Perspectives) course online for Fall 2020.

Dr. Roya Akhavan presents a timely course where students will explore how racism, nationalism, religious strife, gender inequality, and extremes of wealth and poverty function as the root causes of violence and war, and how applying best practices in mass communication can contribute to creating a more just and peaceful world.

header Roy's MassComm class

Sexual abuse of detainees

https://www.aclu.org/blog/immigrants-rights/immigrants-rights-and-detention/ice-detention-center-says-its-not-responsible

A recent investigation into sexual abuse in immigration detention found that there were 1,448 allegations of sexual abuse filed with ICE between 2012 and March 2018. In 2017 alone, there were 237 allegations of sexual abuse in immigration detention facilities.

Ukraine Russia Republic of Luhansk

A Trip to the Pro-Russian Pseudo-State of Luhansk

The war is essentially over in eastern Ukraine, but peace hasn’t yet begun. A visit to the self-proclaimed mini-state known as the People’s Republic of Luhansk shows that the road back to normality is long and full of obstacles.


https://www.spiegel.de/international/world/ukraine-the-pro-russian-pseudo-state-of-luhansk-a-1291870.html

Alexey Karyakin, born in 1980, is one of the fathers of the People’s Republic and was the first president of its parliament — though there are no political parties in parliament, with all of them having been banned. There are only “movements.” One of them is called “Freedom for Luhansk” and the other is the “Economic Union.”

The fact that Karyakin is still alive is anything but a given. The People’s Republic has been run with mafia methods. One Luhansk “prime minister” was apparently tortured to death in prison while several military leaders have died in arson attacks. Karyakin also had to flee Luhansk for a time.

The situation has calmed significantly since a 2017 coup. Plus, what happens in Luhansk is ultimately decided by curators in the Kremlin anyway. Karyakin is now head of the “Public Chamber of the People’s Republic of Luhansk,” a largely ceremonial position. A portrait of Vladimir Putin hangs on the wall above his desk.

The younger ones move away from Luhansk, some to Russia and others to Ukraine. “In 2014, we fell out with many friends,” says one married couple who didn’t share the pro-Russia enthusiasm many felt at the time. “The euphoria has since vanished, which makes things easier for us. But now, everybody avoids politics altogether. Essentially, we are waiting, but we don’t know what for.”

They say they would long since have left if it wasn’t so difficult to sell their apartment in Luhansk. At the same time, it hurts them that many in Ukraine see them as traitors just because they’ve stayed.

Le Monde about far-right

Halimi, S. (2016, June 1). Why the far right is on the rise. Retrieved August 21, 2019, from Le Monde diplomatique website: https://mondediplo.com/2016/06/01edito

Serge Halimi: ‘Imposing cruel sacrifices on entire nations in the name of rules that you don’t understand, and forgetting about those rules as soon as your political cronies break them, creates the climate of amorality and cynicism in which the far right advances.’ (From the archive.)