The Post-LMS World

The Post-LMS World: Social, Simple, Modern, Mobile and Student-centric

 FROM AMBI

By Saad El Yamani     Apr 7, 2019

https://www.edsurge.com/news/2019-04-07-the-post-lms-world-social-simple-modern-mobile-and-student-centric

My note: the author repeats a LinkedIn post from 2017 http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2017/03/28/digital-learning/

Despite its name, the Learning Management System (LMS) is not about learning. The LMS was originally the CMS—Course Management System.

The LMS succeeds as a core productivity tool for educators because it allows institutions to extend their academic capacity and transcend the constraints of time and space. However, the Learning Management System was never able to deliver on the promise of its new name because it was created for a completely different purpose: course management. Learning doesn’t happen within the digital space of the LMS; it happens beyond its borders.

Today’s generation of students is deeply social and collaborative. They rely on real-time online interaction, collaboration and sharing to feel supported, confident and successful. Having grown up on iPhone, Snapchat and Instagram, this generation expects seamless experiences that are deeply social and collaborative.

In the post-LMS world, learning technology is student-centric in its design because today’s students are vocal, creative and eager to share their blue sky ideals and ideas.

The post-LMS world is also social by nature. in the post-LMS world, learning technology is simple, modern and mobile.

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more on learning environments in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2017/07/06/next-gen-digital-learning-environment/

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2016/02/01/trends-tomorrows-teaching-and-learning-environments/

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2017/03/28/digital-learning/

2 Comments on The Post-LMS World

  1. Mary
    April 10, 2019 at 12:46 am (3 months ago)

    Yamani has an interesting take on LMS systems in today’s world. Although course management software might work okay for older college students, it is not suited for elementary and secondary students. I agree that students need to experience and interact with the content and each other in order to learn. Discussion posts, while they can be a great way for asynchronous learners to communicate, do not work as well for high school students who are used to instantaneous feedback. One platform I like for elementary and middle school students is SeeSaw – users can complete assignments alone or with partners and then upload them for the class to see. How do you think technology will adapt to meet the needs of students?

    Reply
  2. Aizhan
    April 10, 2019 at 8:53 pm (3 months ago)

    The author mentions how he expected American education to be more technologically advanced as our society now lives in a post-LMS world. As far as I know, in my country, they are just starting to use course management systems in higher education (believe it or not, there was no such as thing as Moodle, Blackboard, or D2L there until a few years ago). Interesting how what is now considered ineffective here, is looked at as something advanced and innovative in other countries. Either way, moving from one trend to another definitely takes time, so it is not surprising schools have a hard time keeping up with the society’s needs.

    It would be interesting to find research on students’ attitudes towards CMS/LMS.

    Reply

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