wearables by Microsoft Facebook and Google

The competition narrows down between Microsoft HoloLens, Facebook Oculus and Google Glass. Each of them bets on different possibilities, which wearable bring.

Facebook Oculus

https://www.oculus.com/


Also available as podcast: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/apm-marketplace-tech/id73330855

http://techcrunch.com/2014/09/20/oculus-platform/

Microsoft HoloLens

http://www.microsoft.com/microsoft-hololens/en-us

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2015/01/25/microsofts-hololens/

Google Glass

http://www.google.com/glass/start/

Pls consider our related IMS blog entries:
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/?s=wearable

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/?s=google+glass

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/?s=oculus

smart creative

The Google Formula for Success

http://bits.blogs.nytimes.com/2014/09/28/the-google-formula-for-success/

Yet today, the authors insist, fast decision-making and flat organizational models have to become a corporate way of life.

The critical ingredient, they argue in their new book, is to build teams, companies and corporate cultures around people they call “smart creatives.” These are digital-age descendants of yesterday’s “knowledge workers,” a term coined in 1959 by Peter Drucker, the famed management theorist.

Smart creatives, the authors write, are impatient, outspoken risk-takers who are easily bored and change jobs frequently. They are intellectually versatile, typically “combining technical depth with business savvy and creative flair,” the authors note.

 

Facebook’s referral traffic share grew over 37% in Q1 2014, Pinterest was up 48%, Twitter increased only 1%

Facebook’s referral traffic share grew over 37% in Q1 2014, Pinterest was up 48%, Twitter increased only 1%

http://thenextweb.com/facebook/2014/04/21/facebooks-referral-traffic-share-grew-37-q1-2014-pinterest-48-twitter-increased-1/

Shareaholic SOcial Media Traffic Referrals

Once again, the real winner here is Facebook, Pinterest may be able to challenge it soon though, as it is now driving just over a third of the traffic Facebook is.

On teaching and libraries: excerpt from an interview of “Spiegel” with Umberto Eco

http://www.spiegel.de/international/zeitgeist/spiegel-interview-with-umberto-eco-we-like-lists-because-we-don-t-want-to-die-a-659577-2.html

SPIEGEL: But you also said that lists can establish order. So, do both order and anarchy apply? That would make the Internet, and the lists that the search engine Google creates, prefect for you.

Eco: Yes, in the case of Google, both things do converge. Google makes a list, but the minute I look at my Google-generated list, it has already changed. These lists can be dangerous — not for old people like me, who have acquired their knowledge in another way, but for young people, for whom Google is a tragedy. Schools ought to teach the high art of how to be discriminating.

SPIEGEL: Are you saying that teachers should instruct students on the difference between good and bad? If so, how should they do that?

Eco: Education should return to the way it was in the workshops of the Renaissance. There, the masters may not necessarily have been able to explain to their students why a painting was good in theoretical terms, but they did so in more practical ways. Look, this is what your finger can look like, and this is what it has to look like. Look, this is a good mixing of colors. The same approach should be used in school when dealing with the Internet. The teacher should say: “Choose any old subject, whether it be German history or the life of ants. Search 25 different Web pages and, by comparing them, try to figure out which one has good information.” If 10 pages describe the same thing, it can be a sign that the information printed there is correct. But it can also be a sign that some sites merely copied the others’ mistakes.

SPIEGEL: You yourself are more likely to work with books, and you have a library of 30,000 volumes. It probably doesn’t work without a list or catalogue.

Eco: I’m afraid that, by now, it might actually be 50,000 books. When my secretary wanted to catalogue them, I asked her not to. My interests change constantly, and so does my library. By the way, if you constantly change your interests, your library will constantly be saying something different about you. Besides, even without a catalogue, I’m forced to remember my books. I have a hallway for literature that’s 70 meters long. I walk through it several times a day, and I feel good when I do. Culture isn’t knowing when Napoleon died. Culture means knowing how I can find out in two minutes. Of course, nowadays I can find this kind of information on the Internet in no time. But, as I said, you never know with the Internet.