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Western Balkans Information & Media Literacy Conference

Western Balkans Information & Media Literacy Conference

organized by LIT Limerick Institute of Technology, Ireland; Bihac, Bosnia

Conference main themes and topics https://www.wbimlc.org/topics

Information Literacy in the modern world

  • From Information Literacy to Digital Scholarship

  • Fake News and Information Literacy

  • Information literacies (media literacy, Research Literacy, digital literacy, visual literacy, financial literacy, health literacy, cyber wellness, infographics, information behavior, trans-literacy, post-literacy)

  • Information Literacy and academic libraries

  • Information Literacy and adult education

  • Information Literacy and blended learning

  • Information Literacy and distance learning

  • Information Literacy and mobile devices

  • Information Literacy and Gamification

  • Information Literacy and public libraries

  • Information Literacy in Primary and Secondary Schools

  • Information Literacy and the Knowledge Economy

  • Information Literacy and Lifelong Learning

  • Information Literacy and the Information Society

  • Information Literacy and the Multimedia Society

  • Information Literacy and the Digital Society

  • Information Literacy in the modern world (e.g trends, emerging technologies and innovation, growth of digital resources, digital reference tools, reference services).

  • The future of Information Literacy

  • Workplace Information Literacy

Librarians as support to the lifelong learning process

  • Digital literacy, Digital Citizenship

  • Digital pedagogy and Information Literacy

  • Information Literacy Needs in the Electronic Resource Environment

  • Integrating Information Literacy into the curriculum

  • Putting Information Literacy theory into practice

  • Information Literacy training and instruction

  • Instructional design and performance for Information Literacy (e.g. teaching practice, session design, lesson plans)

  •  Information Literacy and online learning (e.g. self-paced IL modules, online courses, Library Guides)

  • Information Literacy and Virtual Learning Environments

  • Supporting users need through library 2.0 and beyond

  • Digital empowerment and reference work

  • Information Literacy across the disciplines

  • Information Literacy and digital preservation

  • Innovative IL approaches

  • Student engagement with Information Literacy

  • Action Literacy

  • Information Literacy, Copyright and Intellectual Property

  • Information Literacy and Academic Writing

Media and Information Literacy – theoretical approaches (standards, assessment, collaboration, etc.)

  • The Digital Competence Framework 2.0

  • Information Literacy theory (models, standards, indicators, Moscow Declaration etc.)

  • Information Literacy and Artificial intelligence

  • Information Literacy and information behavior

  • Information Literacy and reference services: cyber reference services, virtual reference services, mobile reference services

  • Information Literacy cultural and contextual approaches

  • Information Literacy and Threshold concepts

  • Information Literacy evaluation and assessment

  • Information Literacy in different cultures and countries including national studies

  • Information Literacy project management

  • Measuring in Information Literacy instruction assessment

New aspects of education/strategic planning, policy, and advocacy for Information Literacy in a digital age

  • Information Literacy and the Digital Divide

  • Policy and Planning for Information Literacy

  • Branding, promotion and marketing for Information Literacy

  • Cross –sectorial; and interdisciplinary collaboration and partnerships for Information Literacy

  • Leadership and Governance for Information Literacy

  • Strategic planning for IL

  • Strategies in e-learning to promote self-directed and sustainable learning in the area of Information Literacy skills.

standard library instruction

Library Instruction delivered by Plamen Miltenoff, pmiltenoff@stcloudstate.edu

Dr. Kannan Sivaprakasam,
CHEM 151. Feb 10, 8-8:50PM.
Link to this tutorial in PDF format: library instruction tutorial

Short link to this tutorial: http://bit.ly/chem151

QR code

  1. Badges for library instruction

Link to the video tutorial regarding microcredentials (badges)

My name is Plamen Miltenoff (https://web.stcloudstate.edu/pmiltenoff/faculty/)  and I am the InforMedia Specialist with the SCSU Library (http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/free-tech-instruction/).

Dr. Sivaprakasam and I are developing a microcredentialing system for your class.

The “library” part has several components:

  • One badge for your ability to use the databases and find reliable scientific information in your field (required)
    submit your results in the respective D2L assignment folder. A badge will be issued to you after the assignment is graded
  • One badge for completing the quiz based on the information from this library instruction (required)
    a badge will be issued to you automatically after successful completion of the quizz
  • One badge for your ability to use social media for a serious, reliable, scientific research (required)
    submit your results in the respective D2L assignment folder. A badge will be issued to you after the assignment is graded
  • One badge for using the D2L “embedded librarian” widget to contact the librarian with questions regarding your class research (one of two optional)
    A badge will be issued to you after your post with your email or any other contact information is submitted
  • One badge for helping class peer with his research (one of two optional)
    submit your results in the respective D2L assignment folder. A badge will be issued to you after the assignment is graded

Collecting two of the required and one of the optional badges let you earn the superbadge “Mastery of Library Instruction.”

The superbadge brings points toward your final grade.

Master of Library Instruction badge

 

how to collect badges

 

 

 

 

Once you acquire the badges, Dr. Sivaprakasam will reflect your achievement in D2L Grades.

If you are building a LinkedIn portfolio, here are directions to upload your badges in your LinkedIn account using Badgr:

https://community.brightspace.com/s/article/Sharing-Badges-in-Brightspace

chem 151 Social Media accounts

Please do remember we are still developing the system and we will appreciate your questions and feedback; do not hesitate to contact us, if any…

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LIBRARY INSTRUCTION – Information, Digital and Media Literacy

  1. How (where from) do you receive your news? Do you think you are able to distinguish real news from fake news?
    1. Last year, researchers at Oxford Universityfound that 70 countries had political disinformation campaigns over two years.
      http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2020/01/20/bots-and-disinformation/
    2. according to Pew Research Center, 68 percent of American adults get their news from social media—platforms where opinion is often presented as fact.
      results of the international test revealed that only 14 percent of U.S. students were able to reliably distinguish between fact and opinion.

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2020/01/16/fake-news-prevention/

News and Media Literacy (and the lack of) is not very different from Information Literacy

An “information literate” student is able to “locate, evaluate, and effectively use information from diverse sources.” See more About Information Literacy.

How does information literacy help me?

Every day we have questions that need answers. Where do we go? Whom can we trust? How can we find information to help ourselves? How can we help our family and friends? How can we learn about the world and be a better citizen? How can we make our voice heard?

The content of the tutorial is based on the Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education as approved by the Board of Directors of the Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL).

The standards are:

Standard 1. The information literate student determines the nature and extent of the
information needed

Standard 2. The information literate student accesses needed information effectively
and efficiently

Standard 3. The information literate student evaluates information and its sources
critically and incorporates selected information into his or her knowledge
base and value system

Standard 4. The information literate student, individually or as a member of a group,
uses information effectively to accomplish a specific purpose

Standard 5. The information literate student understands many of the economic, legal,
and social issues surrounding the use of information and accesses and uses
information ethically and legally

Project Information Literacy
A national, longitudinal research study based in the University of Washington’s iSchool, compiling data on how college students seek and use information.

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  1. Developing Your Research Topic/Question

Research always starts with a question.  But the success of your research also depends on how you formulate that question.  If your topic is too broad or too narrow, you may have trouble finding information when you search. When developing your question/topic, consider the following:

  • Is my question one that is likely to have been researched and for which data have been published?  Believe it or not, not every topic has been researched and/or published in the literature.
  • Be flexible.  Consider broadening or narrowing the topic if you are getting a limited number or an overwhelming number of results when you search. In nursing it can be helpful to narrow by thinking about a specific population (gender, age, disease or condition, etc.), intervention, or outcome.
  • Discuss your topic with your professor and be willing to alter your topic according to the guidance you receive.

  1. Getting Ready for Research
    Library Resources vs. the Internet
    How (where from) do you receive information about your professional interests?
    Advantages/disadvantages of using Web Resources

chem 151 databases

Evaluating Web Resources

  1. Google or similar; Yahoo, Bing
  2. Google Scholar
  3. Reddit, Digg, Quora
  4. Wikipedia
  5. Become a member of professional organizations and use their online information
  6. Use the SCSU library page to online databases
  1. Building Your List of Keywords
    1. Why Keyword Searching?
      Why not just type in a phrase or sentence like you do in Google or Yahoo!?

      1. Because most electronic databases store and retrieve information differently than Internet search engines.
      2. A databases searches fields within a collection of records. These fields include the information commonly found in a citation plus an abstract (if available) and subject headings.  Search engines search web content which is typically the full text of sources.
    1. The bottom line: you get better results in a database by using effective keyword search strategies.
    2. To develop an effective search strategy, you need to:
      1. determine the key concepts in your topic and
      2. develop a good list of keyword synonyms.
    1. Why use synonyms?
      Because there is more than one way to express a concept or idea.  You don’t know if the article you’re looking for uses the same expression for a key concept that you are using.
    2. Consider: Will an author use:
      1. Hypertension or High Blood Pressure?
      2. Teach or Instruct?
      3. Therapy or Treatment?

Don’t get “keyword lock!”  Be willing to try a different term as a keyword. If you are having trouble thinking of synonyms, check a thesaurus, dictionary, or reference book for ideas.

Keyword worksheet

  1. Library Resources

chem 151 results libsearch
How to find the SCSU Library Website
SCSU online databases

    1. SCSU Library Web page

lib web page

  1. Basic Research Skills

Locating and Defining a Database
Database Searching Overview:
You can search using the SCSU library online dbases by choosing:
Simple search
Advanced search

Simple vs Advanced Search

  1. Identifying a Scholarly Source

scholarly sources

  1. Boolean operators

  1. Databases:
    CINAHL, MEDLINE, PubMed, Health Source: Consumer Edition, Health Source: Nursing/Academic Edition

Psychology:
PsychINFO

General Science
ScienceDirect
Arts & Humanities Citation Index

  1. How do you evaluate a source of information to determine if it is appropriate for academic/scholarly use.  There is no set “checklist” to complete but below are some criteria to consider when you are evaluating a source.
    1. ACCURACY
      1. Does the author cite reliable sources?
      2. How does the information compare with that in other works on the topic?
      3. Can you determine if the information has gone through peer-review?
      4. Are there factual, spelling, typographical, or grammatical errors?
    2.  AUDIENCE
      1. Who do you think the authors are trying to reach?
      2. Is the language, vocabulary, style and tone appropriate for intended audience?
      3. What are the audience demographics? (age, educational level, etc.)
      4. Are the authors targeting a particular group or segment of society?
    3.  AUTHORITY
      1. Who wrote the information found in the article or on the site?
      2. What are the author’s credentials/qualifications for this particular topic?
      3. Is the author affiliated with a particular organization or institution?
      4. What does that affiliation suggest about the author?
    1. CURRENCY
      1. Is the content current?
      2. Does the date of the information directly affect the accuracy or usefulness of the information?
    1. OBJECTIVITY/BIAS
      1. What is the author’s or website’s point of view?
      2. Is the point of view subtle or explicit?
      3. Is the information presented as fact or opinion?
      4. If opinion, is the opinion supported by credible data or informed argument?
      5. Is the information one-sided?
      6. Are alternate views represented?
      7. Does the point of view affect how you view the information?
    1. PURPOSE
      1. What is the author’s purpose or objective, to explain, provide new information or news, entertain, persuade or sell?
      2. Does the purpose affect how you view the information presented?
  1. InterLibrary Loan

  1. Copyright and Fair Use
    Author Rights and Publishing & Finding Author Instructions for Publishing in Scholarly Journals

    1. Plagiarism, academic honesty
  2. Writing Tips
  3. Dissemination of Research

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Plamen Miltenoff, Ph.D., MLIS
Professor
320-308-3072
pmiltenoff@stcloudstate.edu
http://web.stcloudstate.edu/pmiltenoff/faculty/
schedule a meeting: https://doodle.com/digitalliteracy
find my office: https://youtu.be/QAng6b_FJqs

 

2019 Study of Faculty and Information Technology

EDUCAUSE Center for Analysis and Research (ECAR)

https://library.educause.edu/resources/2019/12/2019-study-of-faculty-and-information-technology

bar chart illustrating faculty teaching environment preferences for specific course-related activities and assignments

Faculty satisfaction declines, but IT support is valued.

bar chart illustrating faculty ratings of connection and communications resources

Faculty continue to ban student-owned devices, but is there a middle ground for effective learning?

Bar graph illustrating faculty classroom policies on mobile devices

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more on educause and faculty in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=educause+faculty

Digital Literacy EDAD 828

EDAD 828 – digital literacy instructions

Saturday, Jan 25, 2020, Dr. John Eller

    1. How (where from) do you receive your news? Do you think you are able to distinguish real news from fake news?
      1. Last year, researchers at Oxford Universityfound that 70 countries had political disinformation campaigns over two years.
        http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2020/01/20/bots-and-disinformation/
      2. according to Pew Research Center, 68 percent of American adults get their news from social media—platforms where opinion is often presented as fact.
        results of the international test revealed that only 14 percent of U.S. students were able to reliably distinguish between fact and opinion.

    http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2020/01/16/fake-news-prevention/

    News and Media Literacy (and the lack of) is not very different from Information Literacy

An “information literate” student is able to “locate, evaluate, and effectively use information from diverse sources.” See more About Information Literacy

    1. Developing Your Research Topic/Question

    Research always starts with a question.  But the success of your research also depends on how you formulate that question.  If your topic is too broad or too narrow, you may have trouble finding information when you search. When developing your question/topic, consider the following:

    • Is my question one that is likely to have been researched and for which data have been published?  Believe it or not, not every topic has been researched and/or published in the literature.
    • Be flexible.  Consider broadening or narrowing the topic if you are getting a limited number or an overwhelming number of results when you search. In nursing it can be helpful to narrow by thinking about a specific population (gender, age, disease or condition, etc.), intervention, or outcome.
    • Discuss your topic with your professor and be willing to alter your topic according to the guidance you receive.

    1. Getting Ready for Research
      Library Resources vs. the Internet
      How (where from) do you receive information about your professional interests?
      Advantages/disadvantages of using Web Resources

    Evaluating Web Resources

    1. Google or similar; Yahoo, Bing
    2. Google Scholar
    3. Reddit, Digg, Quora
    4. Wikipedia
    5. Become a member of professional organizations and use their online information
    6. Use the SCSU library page to online databases

    1. Building Your List of Keywords
      1. Why Keyword Searching?
        Why not just type in a phrase or sentence like you do in Google or Yahoo!?

        1. Because most electronic databases store and retrieve information differently than Internet search engines.
        2. A databases searches fields within a collection of records. These fields include the information commonly found in a citation plus an abstract (if available) and subject headings.  Search engines search web content which is typically the full text of sources.
      1. The bottom line: you get better results in a database by using effective keyword search strategies.
      2. To develop an effective search strategy, you need to:
    1. determine the key concepts in your topic and
    2. develop a good list of keyword synonyms.
      1. Why use synonyms?
        Because there is more than one way to express a concept or idea.  You don’t know if the article you’re looking for uses the same expression for a key concept that you are using.
      2. Consider: Will an author use:
    1. Hypertension or High Blood Pressure?
    2. Teach or Instruct?
    • Therapy or Treatment?

    Don’t get “keyword lock!”  Be willing to try a different term as a keyword. If you are having trouble thinking of synonyms, check a thesaurus, dictionary, or reference book for ideas.

    Keyword worksheet

  1. Library Resources
    How to find the SCSU Library Website
    SCSU online databases

    1. SCSU Library Web page

library

 

 

+++++!!!!!++++++++++

Test your knowledge:

******* !! *************

  1. Basic Research Skills

  1. Identifying a Scholarly Source

 

 

 

  1. Boolean Operators

  1. Databases

  1. How do you evaluate a source of information to determine if it is appropriate for academic/scholarly use.  There is no set “checklist” to complete but below are some criteria to consider when you are evaluating a source.
    1. ACCURACY
      1. Does the author cite reliable sources?
      2. How does the information compare with that in other works on the topic?
      3. Can you determine if the information has gone through peer-review?
      4. Are there factual, spelling, typographical, or grammatical errors?
    1. AUDIENCE
      1. Who do you think the authors are trying to reach?
      2. Is the language, vocabulary, style and tone appropriate for intended audience?
      3. What are the audience demographics? (age, educational level, etc.)
      4. Are the authors targeting a particular group or segment of society?
    1. AUTHORITY
      1. Who wrote the information found in the article or on the site?
      2. What are the author’s credentials/qualifications for this particular topic?
      3. Is the author affiliated with a particular organization or institution?
      4. What does that affiliation suggest about the author?
    1. CURRENCY
      1. Is the content current?
      2. Does the date of the information directly affect the accuracy or usefulness of the information?
    1. OBJECTIVITY/BIAS
      1. What is the author’s or website’s point of view?
      2. Is the point of view subtle or explicit?
      3. Is the information presented as fact or opinion?
      4. If opinion, is the opinion supported by credible data or informed argument?
      5. Is the information one-sided?
      6. Are alternate views represented?
      7. Does the point of view affect how you view the information?
    1. PURPOSE
      1. What is the author’s purpose or objective, to explain, provide new information or news, entertain, persuade or sell?
      2. Does the purpose affect how you view the information presented?
  1. External resources for research
    1. Academia.edu: https://www.academia.edu/
    2. ResearchGate: https://www.researchgate.net/
    3. Web of Science: https://publons.com/
    4. Web of Science:
    5. ProQuest Dissertations and Theses:
  2. Exporting bibliography records

Zotero. Zotero AddOn for Chrome and Firefox. Zotero for Microsoft Word. Zotero AddOn for Edublog.
Collecting references

  • through the Zotero AddOn for browsers
  • through “export RIS” file

RIS zotero

 

  1. InterLibrary Loan

  1. Copyright and Fair Use
    Author Rights and Publishing & Finding Author Instructions for Publishing in Scholarly Journals

    1. Plagiarism, academic honesty
  2. Writing Tips
  3. Dissemination of Research

Plamen Miltenoff, Ph.D., MLIS, Professor
320-308-3072
pmiltenoff@stcloudstate.edu
schedule a meeting: https://doodle.com/digitalliteracy
find my office: https://youtu.be/QAng6b_FJqs
http://web.stcloudstate.edu/pmiltenoff/faculty/

role of the 21st-century librarians

LACUNY Institute 2020
Friday., May 8, 2020, Bronx Community College, City University of New York (CUNY)

Call for Proposals

Ending the Library Stereotype: Non-Traditional Practices for the 21st-century 
(deadline: February 25, 2020)

 *****Submit your proposal now *****

Librarianship and libraries, through the eyes of the public, have consistently been viewed as a house of books and documents where librarians help their patrons with readers’ advisory and directions. Though these elements of being a librarian exist, the stereotype of this is far from accurate. Today in 2020, Librarians perform a myriad of tasks in order to provide fluid functionality to academic, public and special collections libraries. These tasks create a multifaceted librarian where multi-departmental duties fall squarely on the shoulders of one librarian. This year’s LACUNY Institute will illustrate this multifaceted librarian to gain understanding and perspective of the reality of librarianship as we enter a new era of technology and digital scholarship.

The underlying question LACUNY Institute 2020 aims to address is what role do 21st-century librarians and library support staff play in our society? Although perceptions about librarians have changed over time, librarian stereotypes still persist. This is the case even in popular culture. For instance, Barbara Gordon, Batgirl’s alter-ego, is a librarian with a doctoral degree, yet it is often speculated that the character’s role as an information professional is part of the character’s effort to conceal her identity by working in a safe, slow-paced environment.

Librarianship is a multifaceted and creative profession. This year’s conference will highlight the different roles that librarians play in our society as librarians wear different hats. We are mentors, supervisors, activists, instructors, unofficial guidance counselors, gamers, artistsand so forth. In some instances, we may even be the “cool” professor on campus.

Paper and Panel Proposals

We are collecting individual papers and panel topic proposals pertinent to the personal and professional experience of information professionals and staff that address but are not limited to the following areas:

  • ​Activism within and outside the library
  • The roles of non-librarians or non-information professionals within the profession   
  • Partnerships between libraries and communities
  • (In)Visibility of non-librarian and part-time workers
  • How our unique experiences and/or biases influence cataloging, collection development, the hiring process, etc.
  • How information professionals bring creativity into the profession including classrooms, reference consultations, etc.
  • Multiple identities within the workplace
  • The changing role of the library and what library workers are doing to adapt
  • Interdisciplinary nature of librarianship
  • Library as a place of refuge
  • Information professionals as artists

 *****Submit your proposal now *****

Please Note: Conference registration begins Monday, December 2, 2019.

Feel free to contact us should any questions or concerns arise.

Contact Info: Nelson Santana nelson.santana02@bcc.cuny.edu ​​​​

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more on academic library in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=academic+library

information gerrymandering

Information gerrymandering in social networks skews collective decision-making

https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-019-02562-z

https://www.facebook.com/mariana.damova/posts/10221298893368558

An analysis shows that information flow between individuals in a social network can be ‘gerrymandered’ to skew perceptions of how others in the community will vote — which can alter the outcomes of elections.

The Internet has erased geographical barriers and allowed people across the globe to interact in real time around their common interests. But social media is starting to compete with, or even replace, nationally visible conversations in print and on broadcast media with ad libitum, personalized discourse on virtual social networks3. Instead of broadening their spheres of association, people gravitate towards interactions with ideologically aligned content and similarly minded individuals.

n information gerrymandering, the way in which voters are concentrated into districts is not what matters; rather, it is the way in which the connections between them are arranged (Fig. 1). Nevertheless, like geographical gerrymandering, information gerrymandering threatens ideas about proportional representation in a democracy.

Figure 1 | Social-network structure affects voters’ perceptions. In these social networks, ten individuals favour orange and eight favour blue. Each individual has four reciprocal social connections. a, In this random network, eight individuals correctly infer from their contacts’ preferences that orange is more popular, eight infer a draw and only two incorrectly infer that blue is more popular. b, When individuals largely interact with like-minded individuals, filter bubbles arise in which all individuals believe that their party is the most popular. Voting gridlock is more likely in such situations, because no one recognizes a need to compromise. c, Stewart et al.1 describe ‘information gerrymandering’, in which the network structure skews voters’ perceptions about others’ preferences. Here, two-thirds of voters mistakenly infer that blue is more popular. This is because blue proponents strategically influence a small number of orange-preferring individuals, whereas orange proponents squander their influence on like-minded individuals who have exclusively orane-preferring contacts, or on blue-preferring individuals who have enough blue-preferring contacts to remain unswayed.

Digital fluency for new international graduate students

SHORT LINK TO THIS INFORMATION: http://bit.ly/scsugradstudies

with Melanie Guentzel, Director of Graduate Student Services, mjguentzel@stcloudstate.edu

when: Tue, Jan. 22, 2 PM
where: Plymouth campus on Zoom: https://minnstate.zoom.us/j/438287799
who: new international graduate students at SCSU

students in Engineering Management, Regulatory Affairs, and Applied Clinical Research.

Access the library from a distance: https://www.stcloudstate.edu/library/

Research and Writing Tips

Digital fluency

 

 

embedded librarian

Bedi, S., & Walde, C. (2017). Transforming Roles: Canadian Academic Librarians Embedded in Faculty Research Projects. College & Research Libraries, 78(3), undefined-undefined. https://doi.org/10.5860/crl.78.3.314
As collections become increasingly patron-driven, and libraries share evolving service models, traditional duties such as cataloguing, reference, and collection development are not necessarily core duties of all academic librarians.1
Unlike our American colleagues, many Canadian academic librarians are not required to do research for tenure and promotion; however, there is an expectation among many that they do research, not only for professional development, but to contribute to the profession.
using qualitative inquiry methods to capture the experiences and learning of Canadian academic librarians embedded in collaborative research projects with faculty members.
The term or label “embedded librarian” has been around for some time now and is often used to define librarians who work “outside” the traditional walls of the library. Shumaker,14 who dates the use of the term to the 1970s, defines embedded librarianship as “a distinctive innovation that moves the librarians out of libraries [and] emphasizes the importance of forming a strong working relationship between the librarian and a group or team of people who need the librarian’s information expertise.”15
This model of embedded librarianship has been active on campuses and is most prevalent within professional disciplines like medicine and law. In these models, the embedded librarian facilitates student learning, extending the traditional librarian role of information-literacy instruction to becoming an active participant in the planning, development, and delivery of course-specific or discipline-specific curriculum. The key feature of embedded librarianship is the collaboration that exists between the librarian and the faculty member(s).17
However, with the emergence of the librarian as researcher… More often than not, librarians have had more of a role in the literature-search process with faculty research projects as well as advising on appropriate places for publication.
guiding research question became “In what ways have Canadian academic librarians become embedded in faculty research projects, and how have their roles been transformed by their experience as researchers?”
Rubin and Rubin20 support this claim, noting that qualitative inquiry is a way to learn about the thoughts and feelings of others. Creswell confirms this, stating:
Qualitative research is best suited to address a research problem in which you do not know the variable and need to explore. The literature might yield little information about the phenomenon of study, and you need to learn more from participants through exploration. [Thus] a central phenomenon is the key concept, idea, or process studied in qualitative research.21
eight participants
As Janke and Rush point out, librarians are no longer peripheral in academic research but are now full members of investigative teams.30 But, as our research findings have highlighted, they are making this transition as a result of prior relationships with faculty brought about through traditional liaison work involving collection development, acquisitions, and information-literacy instruction. As our data demonstrates, the extent to which our participants were engaged within all aspects of the research process supports our starting belief that librarians have a vital and important contribution to make in redefining the role of the librarian in higher education.
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Carlson, J., & Kneale, R. (2017). Embedded librarianship in the research context: Navigating new waters. College & Research Libraries News, 72(3), 167–170. https://doi.org/10.5860/crln.72.3.8530
Embedded librarianship takes a librarian out of the context of the traditional
library and places him or her in an “on-site” setting or situation that enables close coordination and collaboration with researchers or teaching faculty
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Summey, T. P., & Kane, C. A. (2017). Going Where They Are: Intentionally Embedding Librarians in Courses and Measuring the Impact on Student Learning. Journal of Library and Information Services in Distance Learning, 11(1–2), 158–174.
Wu, L., & Thornton, J. (2017). Experience, Challenges, and Opportunities of Being Fully Embedded in a User Group. Medical Reference Services Quarterly, 36(2), 138–149.

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more on embedded librarian in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=embedded

education algorithms

https://www.edsurge.com/news/2016-06-10-humanizing-education-s-algorithms

predictive algorithms to better target students’ individual learning needs.

Personalized learning is a lofty aim, however you define it. To truly meet each student where they are, we would have to know their most intimate details, or discover it through their interactions with our digital tools. We would need to track their moods and preferences, their fears and beliefs…perhaps even their memories.

There’s something unsettling about capturing users’ most intimate details. Any prediction model based off historical records risks typecasting the very people it is intended to serve. Even if models can overcome the threat of discrimination, there is still an ethical question to confront – just how much are we entitled to know about students?

We can accept that tutoring algorithms, for all their processing power, are inherently limited in what they can account for. This means steering clear of mythical representations of what such algorithms can achieve. It may even mean giving up on personalization altogether. The alternative is to pack our algorithms to suffocation at the expense of users’ privacy. This approach does not end well.

There is only one way to resolve this trade-off: loop in the educators.

Algorithms and data must exist to serve educators

 

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more on algorithms in this IMS blog
blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=algor

Digital Literacy Initiatives

When Bringing Your Own Device Isn’t Enough: Identifying What Digital Literacy Initiatives Really Need

Authors: Published:  Columns:

https://er.educause.edu/blogs/2019/4/when-bringing-your-own-device-isnt-enough-identifying-what-digital-literacy-initiatives-really-need

Device ownership alone doesn’t make people digitally literate; rather, digital literacy is about how and why they use devices to achieve particular goals and outcomes.

According to the 2018 EDUCAUSE Center for Analysis and Research (ECAR) Study of Undergraduate Students and Information Technology, 95% of undergraduate students own a smartphone and 91% own a laptop. This near-ubiquitous ownership of these devices might suggest that digital literacy is mainstream, but just because students own digital devices does not mean that they’ve developed digital literacy.

Definitions of digital literacy can include the ability to use and access digital devices, but studies from the past decade tend to deepen this definition. A commonly cited definition from Colin Lankshear and Michele Knobel asserts that digital literacy is “shorthand for the myriad social practices and conceptions of engaging in meaning making mediated by texts that are produced, received, distributed, exchanged etc., via digital codification.”

More recently, scholars including Jennifer Sparrow have suggested even adopting the term digital fluency instead of literacy in order to capture how students may need the “ability to leverage technology to create new knowledge, new challenges, and new problems and to complement these with critical thinking, complex problem solving, and social intelligence to solve the new challenges.”

Digital Familiarity Implies Intrinsic Knowledge

two-thirds of faculty think that students are prepared to use software applications, but students themselves express discomfort with applying these tools for learning.

instructional designers are key players who could take a more visible role in higher education to support educators in bringing explicit instruction on digital literacy engagement into their classes. University staff in instructional design and educational/faculty development spaces consult with instructors, lead workshops, and develop support documentation on a regular basis. People in these roles could be more empowered to have conversations with the instructors they support around building in particular lessons

Douglas Belshaw can be a source of inspiration for understanding how his essential elements of digital literacy may contribute to the development of students’ digital fluencies. In particular, some practices may include:

  1. Integrating the use of different applications and platforms so that students obtain practice in navigating these spaces, learning how to locate relevant and reliable information. For example, guiding students to specific databases that provide articles, books, etc., for your discipline may improve information and digital literacy. This is critical because most students default to Google search and Wikipedia, which may not be where you want them to explore topics.
  2. Developing student’s ability to curate content and how to follow academic integrity guidelines for citations and references.
  3. Establishing the norms and purpose for effective communication in a digital academic space.

 

 

 

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