Archive of ‘Digital literacy’ category

altmetrics in education

Altmetrics: A Practical Guide for Librarians, Researchers and Academics

http://www.alastore.ala.org/detail.aspx?ID=11531&zbrandid=4634&zidType=CH&zid=38109786&zsubscriberId=1026665847&zbdom=http://ala-publishing.informz.net

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http://altmetrics.org/tools/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Altmetrics

In scholarly and scientific publishing, altmetrics are non-traditional metrics[2] proposed as an alternative[3] to more traditional citation impact metrics, such as impact factor and h-index.[4] The term altmetrics was proposed in 2010,[1] as a generalization of article level metrics,[5] and has its roots in the #altmetrics hashtag. Although altmetrics are often thought of as metrics about articles, they can be applied to people, journals, books, data sets, presentations, videos, source code repositories, web pages, etc. They are related to Webometrics, which had similar goals but evolved before the social web. Altmetrics did not originally cover citation counts.[6] It also covers other aspects of the impact of a work, such as how many data and knowledge bases refer to it, article views, downloads, or mentions in social media and news media.[7][8]

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more on analytics and metrics in education in this IMS blog

https://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=analytics

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=metrics

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bid data and school abscence

Data Can Help Schools Confront ‘Chronic Absence’

By Dian Schaffhauser 09/22/16

https://thejournal.com/articles/2016/09/22/data-can-help-schools-confront-chronic-absence.aspx

The data shared in June by the Office for Civil Rights, which compiled it from a 2013-2014 survey completed by nearly every school district and school in the United States. new is a report from Attendance Works and the Everyone Graduates Center that encourages schools and districts to use their own data to pinpoint ways to take on the challenge of chronic absenteeism.

The first is research that shows that missing that much school is correlated with “lower academic performance and dropping out.” Second, it also helps in identifying students earlier in the semester in order to get a jump on possible interventions.

The report offers a six-step process for using data tied to chronic absence in order to reduce the problem.

The first step is investing in “consistent and accurate data.” That’s where the definition comes in — to make sure people have a “clear understanding” and so that it can be used “across states and districts” with school years that vary in length. The same step also requires “clarifying what counts as a day of attendance or absence.”

The second step is to use the data to understand what the need is and who needs support in getting to school. This phase could involve defining multiple tiers of chronic absenteeism (at-risk, moderate or severe), and then analyzing the data to see if there are differences by student sub-population — grade, ethnicity, special education, gender, free and reduced price lunch, neighborhood or other criteria that require special kinds of intervention.

Step three asks schools and districts to use the data to identify places getting good results. By comparing chronic absence rates across the district or against schools with similar demographics, the “positive outliers” may surface, showing people that the problem isn’t unstoppable but something that can be addressed for the better.

Steps five and six call on schools and districts to help people understand why the absences are happening, develop ways to address the problem.

The report links to free data tools on the Attendance Works website, including a calculator for tallying chronic absences and guidance on how to protect student privacy when sharing data.

The full report is freely available on the Attendance Works website.

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more on big data in education in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=data

Stacks CMS for libraries

EBSCO Launches Content Management System for Libraries

By Leila Meyer 09/26/16

https://thejournal.com/articles/2016/09/26/ebsco-debuts-content-management-system-for-libraries.aspx

EBSCO Information Services has debuted Stacks, a hosted content management system for libraries, and Stacks Mobile, a native app for iOS and Android devices.

Social media integration, including Goodreads, Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn;

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more on technology in libraries in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=library

American Internet slow

Why Is American Internet So Slow?

Antiquated phone networks and corporate monopolies do not produce fast Internet.

By Rick Paulas
https://psmag.com/why-is-american-internet-so-slow-98f4eeadb371#.q9v3rd42k

AT&T, Comcast, Verizon, and Time Warner have a “natural monopoly” since they’ve simply been at it the longest. While the Telecommunications Act of 1996 attempted to incentivize competition to upset these established businesses, it didn’t take into account the near impossibility of doing so. As Howard Zinn wrote in A People’s History of the United States, the Telecommunications Act of 1996 simply “enabled the handful of corporations dominating the airwaves to expand their power further.”

Chattanooga has somewhat famously installed its own. Santa Monica also has its own fiber network. The reason these communities have been successful is because they don’t look at these networks as a luxury, but as a mode of self sustainability.

The 19th century’s ghost towns exist because the gold ran out. The 21st century’s ghost towns might materialize because the Internet never showed up.

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more on Internet access in this IMS blog

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=internet+access

ALA resources for social media in libraries

Social media basics: Engaging your library users

http://www.ala.org/news/press-releases/2014/10/social-media-basics-engaging-your-library-users

Managing Traditional & Social Media for Libraries

http://www.ala.org/pla/onlinelearning/webinars/archive/media

Use of Social Media in the Library

http://www.ala.org/alcts/confevents/upcoming/webinar/121014

Social media has the potential to facilitate much closer relationships between libraries and their patrons. Current usage of social media by the library community generally remains ad hoc and somewhat experimental, but the uptake of these tools is accelerating, and they will likely play an increasingly important role in library service provision and outreach in the future. Taylor & Francis has produced a white paper that analyzes current practices relating social media’s use in the library and how this differs by librarian job role. The sample was taken from academic librarians around the world, which also allows us to examine differences by geographic location. The goal: to establish how librarians are currently using social media in their roles, the most useful social media tools and best applications for these tools in a library setting.

bit.ly/LibrarySM
http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/access/white-paper-social-media.pdf
http://downloads.alcts.ala.org/ce/141012socialmedialibrary_Slides.pdf

Academic Libraries

http://www.ala.org/news/state-americas-libraries-report-2014/academic-libraries

Learn to plan and strategize for ‘A More Effective Social Media Presence’ in new workshop

http://www.ala.org/news/press-releases/2012/08/learn-plan-and-strategize-more-effective-social-media-presence-new-workshop

Using social media to find collaboration, coordination and focus

http://www.ala.org/news/press-releases/2012/11/using-social-media-find-collaboration-coordination-and-focus promotes http://store.elsevier.com/Managing-Social-Media-in-Libraries/Troy-Swanson/isbn-9781780633770/

Rethinking social media to organize information and communities, popular eCourse returns!

http://www.ala.org/news/member-news/2016/02/rethinking-social-media-organize-information-and-communities-popular-ecourse

explores a variety of social media tools in terms of how they can be used to organize information and communities. Together, you will survey and use a variety of social media tools, such as Delicious, Diigo, Facebook, Goodreads, Google Hangouts, LibraryThing, Pinterest, Storify, Twitter, and more! You will also explore how social media tools can be used to organize and disseminate information and how they can be used to foster and sustain communities of learning.

Web_Analytics_Part1–Turning_Numbers_Into_Action–1-20-2011 from Paul Signorelli

In age of Social Media U.S. libraries encourage users to choose privacy

http://www.ala.org/news/news/pressreleases2010/april2010/privacy_pio

User-Generated Content in Library Discovery Systems

http://www.ala.org/advocacy/user-generated-content-library-discovery-systems

With the widespread use of library technology that incorporates social media components, intelligent objects, and knowledge-sharing tools comes the ability of libraries to provide greater opportunities for patron engagement in those discovery systems through user-generated content.  These features may include the ability of users to contribute commentary such as reviews, simple point-and-click rating systems (e.g. one star to five stars), or to engage in extensive discussions or other social interactions. This kind of content could transform authoritative files, alter information architecture, and change the flow of information within the library discovery system.

Privacy Shifting

http://www.ala.org/transforminglibraries/future/trends/privacy

Across generations, concerns for privacy may dissipate with time as specific technologies take hold or as people become aware of a technology’s benefits and value those over their value for privacy.

Library Privacy Guidelines for Students in K-12 Schools

http://www.ala.org/advocacy/library-privacy-guidelines-students-k-12-schools

my note: excellent blueprint for similar activities / policies at higher ed.

Twitter Social Media Analytics

#1: Adjust Your Content Mix

On Facebook, go to Insights > Posts > Post Types to review the engagement by the type of content you posted (post, link, image, video). On Twitter, you can see a snapshot of each post you’ve made by going to Settings > Analytics > Tweets.

#2: Fine-tune Your Posting Schedule

On Facebook, go to Insights > Posts > When Your Fans Are Online. For Twitter, you can use a tool such a Tweriod to find out when the bulk of your followers are online.

#3: Inform Your Messaging

On Facebook, open the Ads Manager and go to Audience Insights. On Twitter, you can check your audience data by going to Settings > Twitter Ads > Analytics > Audience Insights.

#4: Boost Your Engagement

On Twitter, go to Settings > Analytics > Tweets and take a look at which post topics get the most engagement. On Facebook, go to Insights > Posts > Post Types and then switch the engagement metrics in Facebook to show reactions, comments, and shares for each post rather than post clicks or general engagement.

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more on social media analytics in this blog

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=social+media+analytics

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